The Object Primer: Agile Model-Driven Development with UML 2.0 / Edition 3

The Object Primer: Agile Model-Driven Development with UML 2.0 / Edition 3

5.0 1
by Scott W. Ambler
     
 

ISBN-10: 0521540186

ISBN-13: 9780521540186

Pub. Date: 03/22/2004

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Scott Ambler, award-winning author of Building Object Applications that Work, Process Patterns, and More Process Patterns, has revised his acclaimed first book, The Object Primer. Long prized by both students and professionals as the best introduction to object-oriented technology, this book is now completely up-to-date, with all modeling notation rewritten in the

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Overview

Scott Ambler, award-winning author of Building Object Applications that Work, Process Patterns, and More Process Patterns, has revised his acclaimed first book, The Object Primer. Long prized by both students and professionals as the best introduction to object-oriented technology, this book is now completely up-to-date, with all modeling notation rewritten in the just-released UML 2.0. All chapters have been revised to take advantage of Agile Modeling (AM), which is presented in the new chapter 2 along with other important new modeling techniques. Review questions at the end of each chapter allow readers to test their newly acquired knowledge. In addition, Ambler takes time to reflect on the lessons learned over the past few years by discussing the proven benefits and drawbacks of the technology. This is the perfect book for any software development professional or student seeking an introduction to the concepts and terminology of object technology. Previous Edition Pb (2001): 0-521-78519-7 Scott W. Ambler is a senior object consultant with Ronin International, Inc. and a popular speaker at conferences worldwide. He has worked with OO technology since 1990 as a business architect, system analyst, system designer, mentor, Smalltalk/C++/Java developer, and OO software process manager. He is a member of the IEEE Computer Society, the ACM, and Mensa.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521540186
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
03/22/2004
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
572
Sales rank:
483,929
Product dimensions:
6.97(w) x 9.21(h) x 1.06(d)

Table of Contents

1. Introduction; 2. Full lifecycle object-oriented testing (FLOOT); 3. Agile modeling driven development (AMDD); 4. Agile requirements; 5. Object-oriented concepts; 6. Agile object analysis; 7. Agile object architecture; 8. Agile object design; 9. Agile object programming techniques; 10. Agile database development techniques; 11. Where to go from here.

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The Object Primer: Agile Model-Driven Development with UML 2.0 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've been looking at the online text of Scott's Object Primer 3/e and just ordered my own copy, because he's the first person I've seen other than Ivar Jacobsen to get Use Cases completely right. I have been using Use Cases since before UML 1.0 and I have always been disappointed by the general inability of practitioners to understand and apply the extend and include dependencies (and their predecessors.) Many practitioners advise against the use of these dependencies (which is better than using them incorrectly or inconsistently.) I have found no tool that implements them completely and correctly. I was pleasantly surprised to find that Scott Ambler's treatment of these dependencies in the Object Primer 3/e matched my own experience applying them in many environments. First, he states they should be used sparingly. (Overly complex collections of use cases and diagrams are not helpful to anyone.) Second, he has a consistent notation for the point at which each extend or include dependency is invoked. (Some practitioners state that the base use case should not have a reference to the extension, others leave off references to included use cases - neither of these practices is consistent with UML 2.0.) These are simple principles, but not following them has caused many people to get far less out of their use cases than they could have.