Object Relations in Psychoanalytic Theory / Edition 1

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Editorial Reviews

International Journal of Psycho-Analysis

A most valuable contribution to the psychoanalytic literature. The authors have undertaken to review all of the psychoanalytic theories concerning object relationships, comparing and contrasting the 'classical' theory with derivatives of it and the important theories which have arisen in opposition to it...It increases the value of the book to readers at all levels that they have elected to make their reviews of the various theories quite full, so that it is possible really to learn something about each theory in some depth...The authors have considered each position from the point of view of its internal logic, correspondence to the clinical data, and how well it seems to answer the problems which it set out to solve...This is a splendid book.
— Adrienne Applegarth

Contemporary Psychiatry

We are...fortunate that we have the likes of Greenberg and Mitchell to provide us with a first-class study in comparative psychoanalysis to help us keep our minds open. The authors summarize the contributions of Sigmund Freud, H. S. Sullivan, Erich Fromm, Melanie Klein, W. R. D. Fairbairn, D. W. Winnicott, Harry Guntrip, Heinz Hartmann, Margaret Mahler, Edith Jacobson, Otto Kernberg, Heinz Kohut, and Joseph Sandler, organizing these presentations around the particular visions of object relations each has offered...This is a splendid book for several reasons. Its intent embodies the best attitudes in psychoanalysis, and its execution is very sophisticated and instructive. It certainly deserves your study.
— Jeffrey J. Andresen, M.D.

Contemporary Psychology

That the neo-Freudians and the British object-relations theorists emphasize relationships is well known. What is not well known, and what constitutes Greenberg and Mitchell's special contribution, is the idea that accounting for relationships may be a defining task of all psychoanalytic theorizing and that the various theories can usefully be categorized, contrasted, and understood in terms of their particular strategies for doing so...Greenberg and Mitchell's book provides access to this difficult literature. Their discussions of the various psychoanalytic theories are scholarly, convincing, and packed with clever connections and intriguing observations...[The book] provides a long-sought path through the thicket of psychoanalytic writing.
— Daniel B. Wile

International Journal of Psycho-Analysis - Adrienne Applegarth
A most valuable contribution to the psychoanalytic literature. The authors have undertaken to review all of the psychoanalytic theories concerning object relationships, comparing and contrasting the 'classical' theory with derivatives of it and the important theories which have arisen in opposition to it...It increases the value of the book to readers at all levels that they have elected to make their reviews of the various theories quite full, so that it is possible really to learn something about each theory in some depth...The authors have considered each position from the point of view of its internal logic, correspondence to the clinical data, and how well it seems to answer the problems which it set out to solve...This is a splendid book.
Contemporary Psychiatry - Jeffrey J. Andresen
We are...fortunate that we have the likes of Greenberg and Mitchell to provide us with a first-class study in comparative psychoanalysis to help us keep our minds open. The authors summarize the contributions of Sigmund Freud, H. S. Sullivan, Erich Fromm, Melanie Klein, W. R. D. Fairbairn, D. W. Winnicott, Harry Guntrip, Heinz Hartmann, Margaret Mahler, Edith Jacobson, Otto Kernberg, Heinz Kohut, and Joseph Sandler, organizing these presentations around the particular visions of object relations each has offered...This is a splendid book for several reasons. Its intent embodies the best attitudes in psychoanalysis, and its execution is very sophisticated and instructive. It certainly deserves your study.
Contemporary Psychology - Daniel B. Wile
That the neo-Freudians and the British object-relations theorists emphasize relationships is well known. What is not well known, and what constitutes Greenberg and Mitchell's special contribution, is the idea that accounting for relationships may be a defining task of all psychoanalytic theorizing and that the various theories can usefully be categorized, contrasted, and understood in terms of their particular strategies for doing so...Greenberg and Mitchell's book provides access to this difficult literature. Their discussions of the various psychoanalytic theories are scholarly, convincing, and packed with clever connections and intriguing observations...[The book] provides a long-sought path through the thicket of psychoanalytic writing.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674629752
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 11/28/1983
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 456
  • Sales rank: 1,348,068
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 0.12 (d)

Table of Contents

Object Relations in Psychoanalytic Theory offers a conceptual map of the most difficult terrain in psychoanalysis as well as a history of its most complex disputes. In exploring the counterpoint between different psychoanalytic traditions, it provides a synthetic perspective that is a major contribution to psychoanalytic thought.

The focal point of clinical psychoanalysis has always been the patient's relationships with others. How do these relationships come about? How do they operate? How are they transformed? How are relationships with others to be understood within the framework of psychoanalytic theory?

Greenberg and Mitchell argue that there have been two basic solutions to the problem of locating relationships within psychoanalytic theory: the drive model, in which relations with others are generated and shaped by the need for drive gratification; and various relational models, in which relationships themselves are taken as primary and irreducible. The authors provide a masterful overview of the history of psychoanalytic ideas, in which they trace the divergences and the interplay between the two models and the intricate strategies adopted by the major theorists in their efforts to position themselves with respect to these models. They demonstrate further that many of the controversies and fashions in diagnosis and psychoanalytic technique can be fully understood only in the context of the dialectic between the drive model and the relational models.

The authors are both psychoanalysts in private practice in New York. Jay Greenberg is a training and supervising analyst at the William Alanson White Institute of Psychiatry Psychoanalysis, and Psychology, and a clinical associate professor of psychology at New York University. Stephen A. Mitchell is a supervising analyst and on the faculty of the William Alanson White Institute, and a member of the faculty of the New York University Post-Doctoral Program in Psychoanalysis.

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