Objectivity

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Overview

Objectivity has a history, and it is full of surprises. In Objectivity, LorraineDaston and Peter Galison chart the emergence of objectivity in the mid-nineteenth-century sciences—and show how the concept differs from its alternatives, truth-to-nature and trained judgment. This is a story of lofty epistemic ideals fused with workaday practices in the making of scientific images. From the eighteenth through the early twenty-first centuries, the images that reveal the deepest commitments of the empirical sciences—from anatomy to crystallography—are those featured in scientific atlases, the compendia that teach practitioners what is worth looking at and how to look at it. Galison and Daston use atlas images to uncover a hidden history of scientific objectivity and its rivals. Whether an atlas maker idealizes an image to capture the essentials in the name of truth-to-nature or refuses to erase even the most incidental detail in the name of objectivity or highlights patterns in the name of trained judgment is a decision enforced by an ethos as well as by an epistemology. As Daston and Galison argue, atlases shape the subjects as well as the objects of science. To pursue objectivity—or truth-to-nature or trained judgment—is simultaneously to cultivate a distinctive scientific self wherein knowing and knower converge.

Moreover, the very point at which they visibly converge is in the very act of seeing not as a separate individual but as a member of a particular scientific community. Embedded in the atlas image, therefore, are the traces of consequential choices about knowledge, persona, and collective sight. Objectivity is a book addressed to anyone interested in the elusive and crucial notion of objectivity— and in what it means to peer into the world scientifically. Lorraine Daston isDirector at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin, Germany. She is the coauthor of Wonders and the Order of Nature, 1150-1750 and the editor of Things That Talk: ObjectLessons from Art and Science (both Zone Books). Peter Galison is Pellegrino University Professor of the History of Science and of Physics at Harvard University. He is the author of Einstein's Clocks,Poincaré's Maps: Empires of Time, How Experiments End, and Image and Logic: A Material Culture ofMicrophysics, and other books, and coeditor (with Emily Thompson) of The Architecture of Science (MIT Press, 1999).

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"As Lorraine Daston and Peter Galison point out in their capacious and engaging study of the concept of scientific objectivity from the 17th century to the present day, the universal form is key to understanding how modern science moved from the study of curiosities, through the representations of perfect, notional specimens, to a concept of objectivity as responsibility for science." Brian Dillon Modern Painters

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"The author's argument here is complicated but fascinating (and, because the argument is about images, the book is beautiful)." Science

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"This is a surprising, engrossing book that treats humanity's struggle to unsnarl the world and itself as a field of endless turmoil and fascination." RainTaxi

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"We need history of science in the style of Daston and Galison: a history of science that commands the details but at the same time discerns the shape of larger developmentsand that makes us realize just how many meanings have been packed into the little word 'objectivity,' which rolls so trippingly off the tongue." Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781890951795
  • Publisher: Zone Books
  • Publication date: 12/10/2010
  • Pages: 501
  • Sales rank: 946,658
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 1.70 (d)

Meet the Author

Lorraine Daston is Director at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin,Germany. She is the coauthor of Wonders and the Order of Nature, 1150-1750 and the editor of Things That Talk: Object Lessons from Art and Science (both ZoneBooks).

Peter Galison is Pellegrino University Professor of the History of Science and of Physics atHarvard University. He is the author of Einstein's Clocks, Poincaré's Maps: Empires ofTime, How Experiments End, and Image and Logic: A Material Culture ofMicrophysics, among other books, and coeditor (with Emily Thompson) of TheArchitecture of Science (MIT Press, 1999).

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