BN.com Gift Guide

Occasions for Writing (with 2009 MLA Update Card) / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $104.76
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 13%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $104.76   
  • New (8) from $104.76   
  • Used (2) from $139.94   

Overview

Is it possible that a book of readings can help you develop your writing skills and guide you to success in your composition course? It can when the book is OCCASIONS FOR WRITING, an exciting new collection of readings that helps you discover how everything you encounter in life is an occasion or reason to write! In addition to its large selection of untraditional, fascinating readings, this reader contains effective "Occasions for Writing" activities that help you to look closely at written text, photographs, other media-and literally everything in your life-guiding you in developing the fresh ideas that lead to strong, original essays. Students receive the most up-to-date information on MLA documentation with the enclosed tri-fold card providing NEW 2009 MLA Handbook formats.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780495899945
  • Publisher: Cengage Learning
  • Publication date: 5/20/2009
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 864
  • Sales rank: 881,319
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Robert DiYanni, who has taught English and Humanities at Harvard, Pace, and the City University of New York, is Director of International Services at the College Board. He received his B.A. from Rutgers University and his Ph.D. from the City University of New York. A professor of English and Humanities at New York University, Dr. DiYanni has lectured and conducted workshops in the United States and abroad, especially in Europe and Asia. He has written and edited numerous textbooks, including OCCASIONS FOR WRITING (with Pat C. Hoy, II), THE MCGRAW-HILL BOOK OF POETRY, THE MCGRAW-HILL BOOK OF FICTION, THE SCRIBNER HANDBOOK FOR WRITERS (with Pat C. Hoy, II), WRITING ABOUT THE HUMANITIES, LITERATURE: AN INTRODUCTION, MODERN AMERICAN PROSE, and, among others MODERN AMERICAN POETS: THEIR VOICES AND VISIONS (a text to accompany the PBS television series). He updated the fourth edition of Strunk and White's classic ELEMENTS OF STYLE, and he has co-authored ARTS AND CULTURE: AN INTRODUCTION TO THE HUMANITIES (Prentice Hall), the basis for their lecture series on art and literature given at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Pat C. Hoy, II, director of the Expository Writing Program and professor of English at New York University, has held appointments at the U.S. Military Academy and Harvard. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Hoy regularly teaches freshman composition and is the author of numerous textbooks and articles, including THE SCRIBNER HANDBOOK FOR WRITERS, Fourth Edition (with Robert DiYanni). His essays have appeared in SEWANEE REVIEW, VIRGINIA QUARTERLY REVIEW, AGNI, TWENTIETH CENTURY LITERATURE, SOUTH ATLANTIC REVIEW, and THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. Eight of his essays have been selected as "Notables" in Best American Essays. INSTINCT FOR SURVIVAL: ESSAYS BY PAT C. HOY II was selected as a "Notable" collection in Best American Essays of the Century. He was awarded the 2003 Cecil Woods, Jr., Prize for Nonfiction from the Fellowship of Southern Writers.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Part I: A BRIEF GUIDE TO WRITING. 1. The Practice of Writing. Why Am I Writing Essays? An Occasion for Writing. Using Your Voice and Finding Your Character. Moving from Evidence to Idea to Essay. Evidence. Idea. Essay. How to Reveal the Discoveries? Analysis. Interpretation. Reflection and Meaning. Making Evidence and Discovery Work Together. 2. An Exploratory Essay: A Student's Progress. Using Images and Experience as Evidence. 3. The Persuasive Essay: A Student's Progress. Using Text and Experience as Evidence. 4. An Introduction to Visual Understanding. Keeping Your Eyes Open and Learning to See. A Strategy for Visual Understanding. Looking and Responding. Analyzing Images: Categorizing to Make Sense of What You See. Focal Point and Emphasis. Figure-Ground Contrast. Grouping: Proximity & Similarity. Color. Continuation. Line. Closure. Narration or Story. Context. The Whole Composition. Communicating What You See. A Sample Student Paper, Ryan Pollack, Visible Feelings. Part II: THEMES FOR WRITING. 5. Stories. Cluster 1: Mark Doty, Souls on Ice. Samuel Scudder, Look at Your Fish. John Berger, Steps Towards a Small Theory of the Visible. Cluster 2: Virginia Woolf, Portrait of a Londoner. Richard Rodriguez, Late Victorians. Jim Corder, Aching for a Self. Anthology Readings: Diane Ackerman, In the Memory Mines. Brian Doyle, Yes. Malcolm Gladwell, The Tipping Point. Michael Paterniti, The Most Dangerous Beauty. 6. Identity. Cluster 1: Brent Staples, Just Walk on By. Zora Neale Hurston, How It Feels to Be Colored Me. Judith Ortiz Cofer, The Myth of the Latin Woman. Cluster 2: Eva Hoffman, Lost in Translation. N. Scott Momaday, The Way to Rainy Mountain. James Baldwin, Stranger in the Village. Anthology Readings: Jamaica Kincaid, On Seeing England for the First Time. Sojourner Truth, Ain't I a Woman. Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Women. 7. Gender. Cluster1: Susan Brownmiller, Femininity. Deborah Tannen, Men and Women Talking. Judy Ruiz, Oranges and Sweet Sister Boy. Cluster 2: Paul Fussell, Uniforms. Susan Sontag, A Woman's Beauty: Put-Down or Power Source? Alice Walker, Beauty: When the Other Dancer is the Self. Anthology Readings: Bernard Cooper, Burl's. Gretel Ehrlich, About Men. Paul Theroux, Being a Man. Sojourner Truth, Ain't I a Woman. Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Women. 8. Families. Cluster 1: Chang Rae Lee, Coming Home Again. Barbara Kingsolver, Stone Soup. Barbara Ehrenreich, Family Values. Cluster 2: David Sedaris, Cyclops. bell hooks, Inspired Eccentricity. Maxine Hong Kingston, No-Name Woman. Anthology Readings: Diane Ackerman, In the Memory Mines. Bernard Cooper, Burl's. Brian Doyle, Yes. 9. Education. Cluster 1: Frederick Douglass: Learning to Read and Write. Maya Angelou, Graduation. Bernard Cooper, Labyrinthine. Cluster 2: Eudora Welty, Clamorous to Learn. Adrienne Rich, Claiming an Education. Paolo Freire, The Banking Concept of Education. Anthology Readings: Roland Barthes, Toys. E. M. Forster, On Not Looking at Pictures. Michael Lewis, The Curse of Talent. Plato, The Allegory of the Cave. Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Women. 10. Nature and the Environment. Cluster 1: Virginia Woolf, The Death of the Moth. Roy Reed, Spring Comes to Hogeye. Annie Dillard, Transfiguration. Cluster 2: William Cronon, The Trouble with Wilderness. Ann Zwinger, The Desert World. Barry Lopez, The Stone Horse. Anthology Readings: Malcolm Gladwell, The Tipping Point. Jamaica Kincaid, On Seeing England for the First Time. Michael Paterniti, The Most Dangerous Beauty. Walker Percy, The Loss of the Creature. 11. Science and Technology. Cluster 1: Jacob Bronowski, The Nature of Scientific Reasoning. Alan Lightman, The Art of Science. E.O. Wilson, The Bird of Paradise. Cluster 2: Sven Birkerts, Into the Electronic Millennium. Terry Tempest Williams, A Shark in the Mind of One Contemplating Wilderness. Lewis Thomas, Crickets, Bats, Cats, and Chaos. Anthology Readings: Diane Ackerman, In the Memory Mines. Roland Barthes, Toys. Malcolm Gladwell, The Tipping Point. Michael Paterniti, The Most Dangerous Beauty. 12. Language and Thought. Cluster 1: Richard Rodriguez, Aria: A Memoir of a Bilingual Childhood. George Orwell, Politics and the English Language. Suzanne K. Langer, Signs and Symbols. Cluster 2: Ursula LeGuin: Where Do You Get Your Ideas? Edward de Bono, Logical and Lateral Thinking. Matthew Goulish, Criticism. Anthology Readings: Diane Ackerman, In the Memory Mines. Brian Doyle, Yes. E. M. Forster, On Not Looking at Pictures. Thomas Jefferson et al., The Declaration of Independence. Walker Percy, The Loss of the Creature. 13. Ethics and Values. Cluster 1: Joan Didion, On Self Respect. Henry David Thoreau, Why I Went Into the Woods. Sissela Bok, On Lying. Cluster 2: Langston Hughes, Salvation. Nancy Wilson Ross, An Introduction to Zen. Martin Luther King, Jr., Letter from Birmingham Jail. Anthology Readings: Thomas Jefferson et al., The Declaration of Independence. Plato, The Allegory of the Cave. Jonathan Swift, A Modest Proposal. Lawrence Weschler, Vermeer in Bosnia. Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Women. 14. Work and Working. Cluster 1: Ellen Goodman, The Company Man. George Orwell, Hotel Kitchens. Donald Hall, Lifework. Cluster 2: Ellen Gilchrist, The Middle Way. Tom Friedman, The World Is Flat. Christopher Clausen, Against Work. Anthology Readings: Gretel Ehrlich, About Men. Michael Lewis, The Curse of Talent. Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Women. Part III: ANTHOLOGY FOR FURTHER READING. Diane Ackerman, In the Memory Mines. Roland Barthes, Toys. Bernard Cooper, Burl's. Brian Doyle, Yes. Gretel Ehrlich, About Men. E. M. Forster, On Not Looking at Pictures. Malcolm Gladwell, The Tipping Point. Thomas Jefferson et al., The Declaration of Independence. Jamaica Kincaid, On Seeing England for the First Time. Michael Lewis, The Curse of Talent. Michael Paterniti, The Most Dangerous Beauty. Walker Percy, The Loss of the Creature. Plato, The Allegory of the Cave. Jonathan Swift, A Modest Proposal. Paul Theroux, Being a Man. Sojourner Truth, Ain't I a Woman. Lawrence Weschler, Vermeer in Bosnia. Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Women.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)