Occupation- Based Practice: Fostering Performance & Participation / Edition 1

Paperback (Print)
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 96%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (10) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $125.00   
  • Used (9) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$125.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(178)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by

Overview

Occupation-Based Practice: Fostering Performance and Participation is a joint project of the occupational therapy faculties of McMaster Univ ersity and Washington University. This exceptional new book is designe d to offer the student, instructor, and practitioner opportunities to integrate occupation into the client-centered treatment plan. With rea l-life clinical scenarios and active learning principles, students are able to experience and learn up-to-date and emerging practice in occu pational therapy. The workbook format will support occupational thera pists as they seek to implement a person, environment, and occupation framework in planning client-centered care. It can be used in the clas sroom and also offers practicing occupational therapists a self-study format for learning.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From The Critics
Reviewer: Meryl M Picard, MSW, OTR (Seton Hall University School of Graduate Medical Education)
Description: "The continued drive toward occupation-based client-centered practice has been noted in the majority of practice-related textbooks published over the past several years. The three primary authors, known for their combined and individual abilities to articulate and communicate the need for this type of practice in occupational therapy, have produced a user-friendly workbook to enable students and therapists to negotiate their way through the critical thinking and learning process to enhance occupation-based practice. This book is the outcome of a self-study with contributing authors representing a diverse group of faculty and clinical instructors from McMaster University and Washington University. "
Purpose: "This workbook promotes the development of a thoughtful, person-environment-occupation and systems-based model of practice for current practitioners and students, with acknowledgement of changes in global healthcare practice. This conceptual task housed within a workbook format is unique in its ability to provide therapists with a systematic method for assessing and developing ways to incorporate these models into practice. There is a strong need for this type of format as continuing competency guidelines develop for self-assessment and documentation of learning for practicing therapists. The authors also describe the erosion of the traditional medical model of practice in healthcare and the monumental shifts in occupational therapy practice over the past several decades. A focus on occupational performance is not new, but the value of function is now recognized by most health professions and payers as the benchmark for outcomes, therefore there is a compelling need for occupational therapists to clearly define the uniqueness of our professional practice. "
Audience: "The suggested audience is practitioners, students, and educators, although I believe that practitioners will benefit the most from the use of this text. AOTA and NBCOT have or are in the process of developing documents to facilitate self-assessment of continuing competence. The practical nature of this workbook, with numerous case studies representing a diverse mix of traditional and non-traditional 'clients', targets this self-assessment process in a sequential, systematic format and should facilitate the process of setting personal learning objectives. The workbook also offers occupational therapy departments in all practice arenas an alternative quality assurance project by using the workbook to critically examine their current models and methods of practice. "
Features: The book guides the reader from the theoretical to performance-based practice through carefully constructed cases designed to examine the process of client engagement, assessment, intervention, outcomes, and a final incorporation of all the elements into a more cohesive whole. The clients described in the case studies are diverse, complex, and incorporate all areas of occupational therapy from individual to consultative arenas. The first chapter provides an overview and guideposts for the rest of the workbook. The authors frame occupation-based practice in light of the ICF (International Classification of Functioning, WHO, 2001), occupational therapy models and paradigms of practice that are consistent with occupation-based practice, and provide the initial steps to begin to organize a self-learning plan. The workbook does not provide an in-depth examination of the practice models since those are amply available in other texts. This is not a book that is likely to sit on the bookshelf as a reference. This workbook is designed to demand active participation in the process and provides adequate space in the workbook to answer the questions posed. What distinguishes this from other workbooks sharing equally interesting case studies is the provision of both blank spaces designed to elicit personal responses and teaching areas where examples of each desired skill are articulated for the reader. Textbooks, unfortunately, cannot provide direct feedback to the learner, but the design of the teaching-learning segments in the workbook are woven effectively into each case in order to facilitate the critical reasoning process desired by the chapter. There is little waste of space in this book; the entire workbook is printed in black and white and without photographs. What the workbook offers are targeted series of diagrams to aid in the organization of the case material and facilitate the occupational performance objectives.
Assessment: The authors continue to take the pulse of the profession and have produced a concise, well-framed workbook to enable a large audience to learn practical strategies for incorporating the best of what we do into practice. There are textbooks on the market that incorporate many of the same concepts, but none that will be as useful for guided learning of occupation-based practice. Since the cost of the paperback should be appreciably less than a hardcover, practicing therapists should take advantage of the self-study opportunity offered to enhance their learning to provide state-of-the-art practice to their clients and to also enhance their professional identity.
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Meryl M Picard, MSW, OTR (Seton Hall University School of Graduate Medical Education)
Description: The continued drive toward occupation-based client-centered practice has been noted in the majority of practice-related textbooks published over the past several years. The three primary authors, known for their combined and individual abilities to articulate and communicate the need for this type of practice in occupational therapy, have produced a user-friendly workbook to enable students and therapists to negotiate their way through the critical thinking and learning process to enhance occupation-based practice. This book is the outcome of a self-study with contributing authors representing a diverse group of faculty and clinical instructors from McMaster University and Washington University.
Purpose: This workbook promotes the development of a thoughtful, person-environment-occupation and systems-based model of practice for current practitioners and students, with acknowledgement of changes in global healthcare practice. This conceptual task housed within a workbook format is unique in its ability to provide therapists with a systematic method for assessing and developing ways to incorporate these models into practice. There is a strong need for this type of format as continuing competency guidelines develop for self-assessment and documentation of learning for practicing therapists. The authors also describe the erosion of the traditional medical model of practice in healthcare and the monumental shifts in occupational therapy practice over the past several decades. A focus on occupational performance is not new, but the value of function is now recognized by most health professions and payers as the benchmark for outcomes, therefore there is a compelling need for occupational therapists to clearly define the uniqueness of our professional practice.
Audience: The suggested audience is practitioners, students, and educators, although I believe that practitioners will benefit the most from the use of this text. AOTA and NBCOT have or are in the process of developing documents to facilitate self-assessment of continuing competence. The practical nature of this workbook, with numerous case studies representing a diverse mix of traditional and non-traditional 'clients', targets this self-assessment process in a sequential, systematic format and should facilitate the process of setting personal learning objectives. The workbook also offers occupational therapy departments in all practice arenas an alternative quality assurance project by using the workbook to critically examine their current models and methods of practice.
Features: The book guides the reader from the theoretical to performance-based practice through carefully constructed cases designed to examine the process of client engagement, assessment, intervention, outcomes, and a final incorporation of all the elements into a more cohesive whole. The clients described in the case studies are diverse, complex, and incorporate all areas of occupational therapy from individual to consultative arenas. The first chapter provides an overview and guideposts for the rest of the workbook. The authors frame occupation-based practice in light of the ICF (International Classification of Functioning, WHO, 2001), occupational therapy models and paradigms of practice that are consistent with occupation-based practice, and provide the initial steps to begin to organize a self-learning plan. The workbook does not provide an in-depth examination of the practice models since those are amply available in other texts. This is not a book that is likely to sit on the bookshelf as a reference. This workbook is designed to demand active participation in the process and provides adequate space in the workbook to answer the questions posed. What distinguishes this from other workbooks sharing equally interesting case studies is the provision of both blank spaces designed to elicit personal responses and teaching areas where examples of each desired skill are articulated for the reader. Textbooks, unfortunately, cannot provide direct feedback to the learner, but the design of the teaching-learning segments in the workbook are woven effectively into each case in order to facilitate the critical reasoning process desired by the chapter. There is little waste of space in this book; the entire workbook is printed in black and white and without photographs. What the workbook offers are targeted series of diagrams to aid in the organization of the case material and facilitate the occupational performance objectives.
Assessment: The authors continue to take the pulse of the profession and have produced a concise, well-framed workbook to enable a large audience to learn practical strategies for incorporating the best of what we do into practice. There are textbooks on the market that incorporate many of the same concepts, but none that will be as useful for guided learning of occupation-based practice. Since the cost of the paperback should be appreciably less than a hardcover, practicing therapists should take advantage of the self-study opportunity offered to enhance their learning to provide state-of-the-art practice to their clients and to also enhance their professional identity.
From The Critics
Real-life clinical scenarios and learning principles presented in this user-friendly workbook offer students and practicing occupational therapists opportunities to integrate occupation into the client- centered treatment plan. Coverage includes working in partnership with clients, defining occupational therapy intervention, and doing occupation-based practice. Editor Law is affiliated with McMaster University. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

4 Stars! from Doody
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781556425646
  • Publisher: SLACK, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/1/2002
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 160
  • Product dimensions: 8.40 (w) x 10.80 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments vii
About the Editors ix
Contributing Authors xi
Section 1 Shifting Our Perspective
Chapter 1 Reframing Occupational Therapy Practice 3
Chapter 2 Working in Partnership with Our Clients 17
Chapter 3 Fostering Occupational Performance and Participation 27
Section 2 Reconfiguring Our Practice
Chapter 4 From Diagnosis to Occupational Performance 41
Chapter 5 Doing Client-Centered Practice 51
Section 3 Focusing Our Practice
Chapter 6 Defining Occupational Therapy Intervention 63
Chapter 7 Defining the Outcomes of Occupational Therapy Intervention 79
Chapter 8 Doing Occupation-Based Practice 93
Section 4 Making Occupation-Based Practice Happen
Chapter 9 Occupation-Based Practice: Putting It All Together (Part One) 107
Chapter 10 Occupation-Based Practice: Putting It All Together (Part Two) 115
Section 5 Evaluating
Chapter 11 A Self-Assessment of Your Learning 135
Index 143
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)