Occupational Ghettos: The Worldwide Segregation of Women and Men

Overview

"The last half-century has witnessed dramatic declines in gender inequality, evidenced by the rise of egalitarian views on gender roles and the narrowing of long-standing gender gaps in university attendance and labor force participation. These developments, while spectacular, have been coupled with similarly impressive forms of resistance to equalization, most notably the continuing tendency for women to crowd into female "occupational ghettos." Why has such extreme segregation persisted even as other types of gender inequality have lessened? ...
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Stanford, CA 2005 Hard cover New ed. New. Sewn binding. Cloth over boards. 381 p. Contains: Illustrations. Studies in Social Inequality (Hardcover). Audience: General/trade. NEW ... BOOK, SHIPS NEXT DAY! ! Read more Show Less

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Overview

"The last half-century has witnessed dramatic declines in gender inequality, evidenced by the rise of egalitarian views on gender roles and the narrowing of long-standing gender gaps in university attendance and labor force participation. These developments, while spectacular, have been coupled with similarly impressive forms of resistance to equalization, most notably the continuing tendency for women to crowd into female "occupational ghettos." Why has such extreme segregation persisted even as other types of gender inequality have lessened? Why is segregation especially extreme in precisely those countries that appear most committed to egalitarian reform and family-friendly policies?" The authors address these questions by developing a new archive of cross-national data and applying new models and methods of analysis to this archive. The results indicate that two deep structures underlie occupational segregation: a horizontal dynamic that allocates men into the manual sector and women into the nonmanual sector, and a vertical dynamic that allocates men to the most desirable occupations within each sector. Although egalitarian principles and policies are gradually delegitimating vertical forms of segregation, horizontal forms of segregation continue to be supported by persistent ideologies of gender difference that are easily reconciled with liberal egalitarian ideology. Far from being an "ascriptive residue" that steadily withers away, occupational segregation is an organic feature of postindustrial labor markets.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The authors lay the groundwork for revisiting the basics of our field, and lead readers on an intellectual journal through occupational ghettos... Its highly innovative as well as academically rigorous analysis make Occupational Ghettos a must-read for all scholars interested in workplace gender relations."—Anthropology of Work Review

"The book is essential reading for people interested in gender inequality in labor markets, and its importance has been recognized with the Max Weber Award from the Organizations, Occupations and Work section of the ASA."—Contemporary Sociology

"Twenty-first century women work in offices, shops, and even factories at rates almost as high as men's. Yet most women are still under men when it comes to pay, authority, and autonomy. Charles and Grusky document the tenacity of gender inequality and the crucial role that occupational segregation plays in perpetuating it".—Michael Hout, Professor of Sociology, University of California, Berkeley

"With great technical proficiency, Charles and Grusky lay bare the patterns of occupational segregation shared by all affluent economies: women are over-represented in nonmanual (and men in manual) jobs but in both sectors men still hold better jobs. Everyone who theorizes about gender and class should study these authors' insights."—Paula England, Stanford University

"Occupational Ghettos: The World Wide Segregation of Women and Men addresses a fundamental paradox for gender and work: Women are increasingly present in high-status occupations, but the decline in sex segregation has stalled. In a provocative thesis Maria Charles and David Grusky identify two dimensions of segregation: a hierarchical dimension that egalitarian ideals have weakened and a horizontal dimension that an essentialist view of the sexes has preserved. In developing and painstakingly testing a new theoretical model, Occupational Ghettos is reminiscent of Blau and Duncan's pathbreaking book on the American occupational structure. No one interested in gender in contemporary societies can dare to ignore it."—Barbara Reskin, University of Washington

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780804736343
  • Publisher: Stanford University Press
  • Publication date: 10/28/2003
  • Series: Studies in Social Inequality
  • Pages: 400
  • Product dimensions: 6.58 (w) x 9.48 (h) x 1.05 (d)

Meet the Author

Maria Charles is Professor of Sociology at the University of California, San Diego. David B. Grusky is Professor of Sociology at Stanford University.

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Table of Contents

Ch. 1 The four puzzles of sex segregation 3
Ch. 2 Toward linking theory and method : a new approach to understanding variability in sex segregation 38
Ch. 3 The underlying structure of sex segregation in industrial market economies 61
Ch. 4 Revisiting parsimony : new models of vertical and horizontal segregation 94
Ch. 5 Profiles of change : sex segregation in the United States, 1910-2000 131
Ch. 6 Gender and age in the Japanese labor market, 1950-1995 179
Ch. 7 Gender, nativity, and occupational segregation in Switzerland, 1970-2000 213
Ch. 8 A framework for analyzing industrial and occupational sex segregation in the United States 245
Ch. 9 The past, present, and future of occupational ghettos 297
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Recipe

The last half-century has witnessed dramatic declines in gender inequality, evidenced by the rise of egalitarian views on gender roles and the narrowing of long-standing gender gaps in university attendance and labor force participation. This development, while spectacular, has been coupled with similarly impressive forms of resistance to equalization, most notably the continuing tendency for women to crowd into female “occupational ghettos.” This book answers the important questions: Why has such extreme segregation persisted even as other types of gender inequality have lessened? Why is segregation especially extreme in precisely those countries that appear most committed to egalitarian reform and family-friendly policies?

Read More Show Less

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