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Occupational Therapy in Community-Based Practice Settings / Edition 1

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Overview

This classroom text and reference provides an overview of community-based practice for the student and novice clinician. It reviews basic principles, legislation, and policy issues relevant to all community-based practice.

"This book is highly recommended not only to occupational therapy students and educators but to occupational therapy practitioners as well. For those employed in traditional hospital settings, the abundance of information may certainly help them expand their thinking about the scope of occupatonal therapy practice." -- Karen Butler, Volume 69, Number 5, Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, December 2002

"The text is easily readable and contains chapter key terms and learning objectives which help accentuate information. This text provides a much needed resource for occupational therapists who currently are, or plan to in the future, practice in the community." -- Peggy Wittman, EdD, OTR/L, FAOTA, Occupational Therapy in Health Care Journal, Volume 16, Number 4, 2003

"Very comprehensive. Reviews a variety of possible settings for community practice and appears to cover the process from the beginning on through." -- Anne Marie Knecht, MA, OTR/L, Florida International University, Miami, FL

"...discusses issues related to returning to the community after hospitalization, including accessibility concerns, alternative living arrangements, and community re-entry programs...evaluates future directions."

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Editorial Reviews

Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Louise Thibodaux, MA, OTR/L,FAOTA(University of Alabama)
Description: This book offers a comprehensive overview of the theoretical foundations of community health practice and explores nine model programs in community-based practice settings. Increasingly, therapists are challenged to provide population-based interventions in settings as diverse as work programs, independent living programs, adult day centers, and hospice. This is a welcome resource, bridging the gap between interventions centered on individuals and communities.
Purpose: The purpose is to facilitate a shift of paradigm from direct service provision to community consultation. The book summarizes trends that have led to this shift, applies theoretical models from public health and health education to evolving areas of occupational therapy practice, and provides a roadmap for creating opportunities to work with persons in communities. The topic and format is well suited to the author's primary objective of introducing new information to occupational therapy practitioners.
Audience: Although this book is designed for entry-level students, it will appeal to a much broader audience. Thought-provoking study questions accompany each chapter. The topical presentation makes it a useful resource to faculty. At the same time, its lifespan perspective allows it to be used across many specialty practice areas. Its organization and content arises from the editor's own professional discontent with the paucity of resources linking health education to occupational therapy.
Features: The book is divided into three sections. The first reviews basic principles that shape community practice. The inclusion of numerous figures in this section simplifies the presentation of theoretical material. The second, and longest, section applies these principles to diverse practice areas: work programs, adult day care, independent living, home health, hospice, early intervention, community mental health, and substance abuse. Exploration of each area includes the importance of thorough needs assessment and program planning. The final section draws implications for future practice, education, and research. The appendix lists assessment tools for early intervention, but not for other practice areas. This omission limits the book's appeal in some respects.
Assessment: The editor is to be commended for her careful insights into the changing markets for occupational therapy practice. It is easy to predict that this book will soon come to be regarded as a classic in the field.
Doody's Review Service
Reviewer: Louise Thibodaux, MA, OTR/L,FAOTA(University of Alabama)
Description: This book offers a comprehensive overview of the theoretical foundations of community health practice and explores nine model programs in community-based practice settings. Increasingly, therapists are challenged to provide population-based interventions in settings as diverse as work programs, independent living programs, adult day centers, and hospice. This is a welcome resource, bridging the gap between interventions centered on individuals and communities.
Purpose: The purpose is to facilitate a shift of paradigm from direct service provision to community consultation. The book summarizes trends that have led to this shift, applies theoretical models from public health and health education to evolving areas of occupational therapy practice, and provides a roadmap for creating opportunities to work with persons in communities. The topic and format is well suited to the author's primary objective of introducing new information to occupational therapy practitioners.
Audience: Although this book is designed for entry-level students, it will appeal to a much broader audience. Thought-provoking study questions accompany each chapter. The topical presentation makes it a useful resource to faculty. At the same time, its lifespan perspective allows it to be used across many specialty practice areas. Its organization and content arises from the editor's own professional discontent with the paucity of resources linking health education to occupational therapy.
Features: The book is divided into three sections. The first reviews basic principles that shape community practice. The inclusion of numerous figures in this section simplifies the presentation of theoretical material. The second, and longest, section applies these principles to diverse practice areas: work programs, adult day care, independent living, home health, hospice, early intervention, community mental health, and substance abuse. Exploration of each area includes the importance of thorough needs assessment and program planning. The final section draws implications for future practice, education, and research. The appendix lists assessment tools for early intervention, but not for other practice areas. This omission limits the book's appeal in some respects.
Assessment: The editor is to be commended for her careful insights into the changing markets for occupational therapy practice. It is easy to predict that this book will soon come to be regarded as a classic in the field.
Booknews
This text describes a contemporary way to practice occupational therapy in community and population-based settings. It reviews basic principles, legislation, and policy issues relevant to community-based practice, and discusses issues related to returning to the community after hospitalization. A variety of populations and practice settings are described, including community-based work programs, adult day care, independent living programs, and home health care, with information provided on the role of personnel, referrals, evaluation, treatment, and reimbursement in these settings. Scaffa chairs the Department of Occupational Therapy at the University of South Alabama. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

4 Stars! from Doody
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780803605596
  • Publisher: F. A. Davis Company
  • Publication date: 3/28/2001
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 440
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Table of Contents

Part 1: Basic Principles and Relevant Issues

1. Community-Based Practice: Occupation in Context

2. Paradigm Shift: From the Medical Model to the Community Model

3. Public Health, Community Health, and Occupational Therapy

4. Theoretical Frameworks for Community-Based Practice

5. Legislation and Policy Issues

6. Program Development for Community Health: Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation Strategies

7. Accessibility Issues

Part 2: A Variety of Community-Based Practice Settings

8. Community-Based Work Programs

9. Adult Day-Care Programs

10. Independent Living Programs

11. Home Health

12. Specialized Practice in Home Health

13. Hospice

14. Early Intervention Programs

15. Community-Based Mental Health Services

16. Community-Based Approaches for Substance Use Disorders

Part 3: Looking Ahead

17. Future Directions in Community-Based Practice

18. Implications for Professional Education and Research

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