Ocean of Dharma: The Everyday Wisdom of Chogyam Trungpa

Ocean of Dharma: The Everyday Wisdom of Chogyam Trungpa

by Chogyam Trungpa
     
 

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Here is an inspiring collection of short teachings from the writings of the renowned Tibetan meditation master Chögyam Trungpa. Pithy and immediate, these teachings can be contemplated and practiced every day—or any day—of the year. Drawn from a wide variety of sources—including never-before-published writings—Ocean of Dharma

Overview


Here is an inspiring collection of short teachings from the writings of the renowned Tibetan meditation master Chögyam Trungpa. Pithy and immediate, these teachings can be contemplated and practiced every day—or any day—of the year. Drawn from a wide variety of sources—including never-before-published writings—Ocean of Dharma addresses a range of topics, including fear and fearlessness, accepting our imperfections, developing confidence, helping others, appreciating our basic goodness, and everyday life as a spiritual path.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780834821422
Publisher:
Shambhala Publications, Inc.
Publication date:
09/28/2010
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
569,082
File size:
660 KB

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Read an Excerpt


1. The Challenge of Warriorship

The challenge of warriorship is to live fully in the world as it is and to find within this world, with all its paradoxes, the essence of nowness. If we open our eyes, if we open our minds, if we open our hearts, we will find that this world is a magical place. It is not magical because it tricks us or changes unexpectedly into something else, but it is magical because it can be so vividly, so brilliantly. However, the discovery of that magic can happen only when we transcend our embarrassment about being alive, when we have the bravery to proclaim the goodness and dignity of human life, without either hesitation or arrogance.

2. A Good Journey

Our life is an endless journey. It is like a broad highway that extends infinitely into the distance. The practice of meditation provides a vehicle to travel on that road. Our journey consists of constant ups and downs, hope and fear, but it is a good journey. The practice of meditation allows us to experience all the textures of the roadway, which is what the journey is all about. Through the practice of meditation, we begin to find that within ourselves there is no fundamental complaint about anything or anyone at all.

3. Unlearning

Meditation is the only way to relate with neurosis and self-deception. In this case, meditation does not mean concentrating on objects or trying to intensify certain psychic faculties or anything of that nature. It is simply creating a space, a space in which we can unlearn and undo our subconscious gossip, our hidden fears and hidden hopes, and begin to bring them out. Meditation is simply providing space through the discipline of sitting down and doing nothing. Doing nothing is extremely difficult. At the beginning we can only try to do nothing by imitating doing nothing. And then hopefully we can develop gradually from there.

4. What Is a Warrior?

Anyone who is interested in hearing the dharma, anyone who is interested in finding out about oneself, and anyone who is interested in practicing meditation is basically a warrior. The approach of cowardice is looking for some tremendous external help, whether it comes from the sky or from the earth. You are afraid of actually seeing yourself; therefore you use spirituality or religion as a seeming way of seeing yourself without looking directly at yourself at all. Basically, when people are embarrassed about themselves, there’s no fearlessness involved. Therefore, anybody who is interested in looking at oneself, finding out about oneself, and practicing on the spot could be regarded as a warrior.

5. Facing Ourselves

We have a fear of facing ourselves. That is the obstacle. Experiencing the innermost core of our existence is very embarrassing to a lot of people. A lot of people turn to something that they hope will liberate them without their having to face themselves. That is impossible. We can’t do that. We have to be honest with ourselves. We have to see our gut, our excrement, our most undesirable parts. We have to see them. That is the foundation of warriorship, basically speaking. Whatever is there, we have to face it, we have to look at it, study it, work with it, and practice meditation with it.

Meet the Author

Chögyam Trungpa (1940–1987)—meditation master, teacher, and artist—founded Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado, the first Buddhist-inspired university in North America; the Shambhala Training program; and an international association of meditation centers known as Shambhala International. He is the author of numerous books including Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior, Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism, and The Myth of Freedom.

The compiler and editor of The Collected Works of Chögyam Trungpa, Carolyn Rose Gimian has been editing the works of Chögyam Trungpa for more than twenty-five years. She is the founding director of the Shambhala Archives, the archival repository for Chögyam Trungpa's work in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

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