Overview

INTRODUCTION

Scepticism is as much the result of knowledge, as knowledge is of
scepticism. To be content with what we at present ...
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The Odyssey of Homer

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Overview

INTRODUCTION

Scepticism is as much the result of knowledge, as knowledge is of
scepticism. To be content with what we at present know, is, for the
most part, to shut our ears against conviction; since, from the very
gradual character of our education, we must continually forget, and
emancipate ourselves from, knowledge previously acquired; we must set
aside old notions and embrace fresh ones; and, as we learn, we must
be daily unlearning something which it has cost us no small labour
and anxiety to acquire.

And this difficulty attaches itself more closely to an age in which
progress has gained a strong ascendency over prejudice, and in which
persons and things are, day by day, finding their real level, in lieu
of their conventional value. The same principles which have swept
away traditional abuses, and which are making rapid havoc among the
revenues of sinecurists, and stripping the thin, tawdry veil from
attractive superstitions, are working as actively in literature as in
society. The credulity of one writer, or the partiality of another,
finds as powerful a touchstone and as wholesome a chastisement in the
healthy scepticism of a temperate class of antagonists, as the dreams
of conservatism, or the impostures of pluralist sinecures in the
Church. History and tradition, whether of ancient or comparatively
recent times, are subjected to very different handling from that
which the indulgence or credulity of former ages could allow. Mere
statements are jealously watched, and the motives of the writer form
as important an ingredient in the analysis or his history, as the
facts he records. Probability is a powerful and troublesome test; and
it is by this troublesome standard that a large portion of historical
evidence is sifted. Consistency is no less pertinacious and exacting
in its demands. In brief, to write a history, we must know more than
mere facts. Human nature, viewed under an introduction of extended
experience, is the best help to the criticism of human history.
Historical characters can only be estimated by the standard which
human experience, whether actual or traditionary, has furnished. To
form correct views of individuals we must regard them as forming
parts of a great whole--we must measure them by their relation to the
mass of beings by whom they are surrounded; and, in contemplating the
incidents in their lives or condition which tradition has handed down
to us, we must rather consider the general bearing of the whole
narrative, than the respective probability of its details.

It is unfortunate for us, that, of some of the greatest men, we know
least, and talk most. Homer, Socrates, and Shakespere have, perhaps,
contributed more to the intellectual enlightenment of mankind than
any other three writers who could be named, and yet the history of
all three has given rise to a boundless ocean of discussion, which
has left us little save the option of choosing which theory or
theories we will follow. The personality of Shakespere is, perhaps,
the only thing in which critics will allow us to believe without
controversy; but upon everything else, even down to the authorship of
plays, there is more or less of doubt and uncertainty. Of Socrates we
know as little as the contradictions of Plato and Xenophon will allow
us to know. He was one of the dramatis personae in two dramas as
unlike in principles as in style. He appears as the enunciator of
opinions as different in their tone as those of the writers who have
handed them down. When we have read Plato or Xenophon, we think we
know something of Socrates; when we have fairly read and examined
both, we feel convinced that we are something worse than ignorant.

It has been an easy, and a popular expedient of late years, to deny
the personal or real existence of men and things whose life and
condition were too much for our belief. This system--which has often
comforted the religious sceptic, and substituted the consolations of
Strauss for those of the New Testament--has been of incalculable
value to the historical theorists of the last and present centuries.
To question the existence of Alexander the Great, would be a more
excusable act, than to believe in that of Romulus. To deny a fact
related in Herodotus, because it is inconsistent with a theory
developed from an Assyrian inscription which no two scholars read in
the same way, is more pardonable, than to believe in the good-natured
old king whom the elegant pen of Florian has idealized--Numa
Pompilius.

Scepticism has attained its culminating point with respect to Homer,
and the state of our Homeric knowledge may be described as a free
permission to believe any theory, provided we throw overboard
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940012054692
  • Publisher: New Century Books
  • Publication date: 12/15/2010
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 1,362,080
  • File size: 292 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 48 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(19)

4 Star

(7)

3 Star

(6)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(11)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 47 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2005

    Great Translation

    Lattimore is the best tranlator of Ancient Greek I've seen. As a classics major I have translated numberous tragedies as well as both the Iliad and the Odyssey and Lattimore's translations have often helped me through some rough spots. If you want to get a true idea of the way the Greek was meant to be understood, your best bet is to read translations done by Lattimore.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 1, 2012

    An excellent use of his spare time

    Apparently aircraftsman Shaw (T.E. Lawrence; 'Lawrence of Arabia') occupied his spare time while hiding himself in the ranks of the RAF, translating Homer's Odyssey from the original Greek into accessible English. He therefore broke with the strictures of its verse and moved the epic poem into what is essentially, a great adventure story. It is also reported that he took, by some standards, excessive time in crafting the translation; working on particular sections time and again, until his skills as a wordsmith, brought him perfection in phrasing. It is hard work when you start reading but once you become accustomed to the flow of the text, it eases the effort. Some of the wording is, to me sublime. Two examples illustrate: ‘As he was running on, the Goddess broke into a smile and petted him with her hand. She waxed tall: she turned womanly: she was beauty’s mistress, dowered with every accomplishment of taste. Then she spoke to him in words which thrilled.’(p.189). ‘...for there is nothing so good and lovely as when man and wife in their home dwell together in unity of mind and disposition.’(p.89). Need I say more?

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 25, 2012

    ...

    What is up with the summary? Anyway, I loved this book!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2011

    It is free!

    This is a translation by George Herbert Palmer.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 14, 2000

    The Odyssey of Homer Review

    This book was vey invigorating and interesting, Richard Lattimore was (in my opinion) the best translators of his time.The Odyssey takes you on the voyage of Odyseus and makes it feel like you are right there beside the characters.This is a very good book to enjoy by the fire or anywhere one has room to read and keep thoughts clear.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2014

    This camp disgusts me

    The gods/goddesses list has errors (many) and a real leader of Camp Jupiter would be called a praetor.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2014

    Set t alera

    Again?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2014

    Seth to scythen

    Hey!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2014

    Seth toscythen

    Im back

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2014

    Seth t slash

    Fine. But i thought i was helping!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2014

    Scythen

    "Hey! Good to see ya!"

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2014

    Bios at result one

    Yep.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2014

    Ansley

    Brb I want it named Snow

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2014

    Wats a cohort and a centrum

    Wat is it

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2014

    Ansley

    Lol

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2014

    Slash to seth

    "You should go check out -borgias- all results. Cale fox is helping me fight"

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2014

    Alera

    O.o)) sits in a tree

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2014

    Scythen

    He bows. "Thanks! It's more of a nickname, really..."

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 14, 2014

    Seth t below

    Two things wrong wit that. One, l &#10003ed te gods and goddesses and no errors. And two, this isn't even camp Jupiter idiot. Its my camp.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2014

    Yolo

    Hi

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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