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Of Communion with God the Father, Son and Holy Ghost
     

Of Communion with God the Father, Son and Holy Ghost

by John Owen
 

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In 1657, John Owen produced one of his finest devotional treatises, probably the substance of a series of sermons. He examines the Christian's communion with God as it relates to all three members of the Holy Trinity. Owen directs Christians towards green pastures and still waters, and lays open the exhaustless springs of the Christian's hidden life with God. Yet,

Overview

In 1657, John Owen produced one of his finest devotional treatises, probably the substance of a series of sermons. He examines the Christian's communion with God as it relates to all three members of the Holy Trinity. Owen directs Christians towards green pastures and still waters, and lays open the exhaustless springs of the Christian's hidden life with God. Yet, twenty years after its publication, Of Communion with God provoked the heavy criticism from another theologian. This work brings together not only Owen's original work, but also his response to this heavy criticism. In his reply, Owen vindicates himself from the various mystical sentiments that were ascribed to him. This wonderful book illustrates health Christian dialogue, and is a wonder to read.

Tim Perrine
CCEL Staff Wrtier

This edition features an artistic cover, a new promotional introduction, an index of scripture references, links for scripture references to the appropriate passages, and a hierarchical table of contents which makes it possible to navigate to any part of the book with a minimum of page turns.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940013068407
Publisher:
Christian Classics Ethereal Library
Publication date:
08/26/2011
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
3 MB

Meet the Author

John Owen - (1616-1683), Congregational theologian
Born at Stadhampton, Oxfordshire, Owen was educated at Queen's College, Oxford, where he studied classics and theology and was ordained. Because of the "high-church" innovations introduced by Archbishop William Laud, he left the university to be a chaplain to the family of a noble lord. His first parish was at Fordham in Essex, to which he went while the nation was involved in civil war. Here he became convinced that the Congregational way was the scriptural form of church government. In his next charge, the parish of Coggeshall. in Essex, he acted both as the pastor of a gathered church and as the minister of the parish. This was possible because the parliament, at war with the king, had removed bishops. In practice, this meant that the parishes could go their own way in worship and organization.

Oliver Cromwell liked Owen and took him as his chaplain on his expeditions both to Ireland and Scotland (1649-1651). Owen's fame was at its height from 1651 to 1660 when he played a prominent part in the religious, political, and academic life of the nation. Appointed dean of Christ Church, Oxford, in 1651, he became also vice-chancellor of the university in 1652, a post he held for five years with great distinction and with a marked impartiality not often found in Puritan divines. This led him also to disagreement, even with Cromwell, over the latter's assumption of the protectorship. Owen retained his deanery until 1659. Shortly after the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, he moved to London, where he was active in preaching and writing until his death. He declined invitations to the ministry in Boston (1663) and the presidency of Harvard (1670) and chided New England Congregationalists for intolerance. He turned aside also from high preferment when his influence was acknowledged by governmental attempts to persuade him to relinquish Nonconformity in favor of the established church.

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