Of Duty Well and Faithfully Done: A History of the Regular Army in the Civil War

Overview


On the eve of the Civil War, the Regular Army of the United States was small, dispersed, untrained for large-scale operations, and woefully unprepared to suppress the rebellion of the secessionist states. Although the Regular Army expanded significantly during the war, reaching nearly sixty-seven thousand men, it was necessary to form an enormous army of state volunteers that overshadowed the Regulars and bore most of the combat burden. Nevertheless, the Regular Army played several critically important roles, ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (9) from $55.79   
  • New (6) from $55.79   
  • Used (3) from $56.05   
Of Duty Well and Faithfully Done: A History of the Regular Army in the Civil War

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$45.49
BN.com price
(Save 39%)$75.00 List Price

Overview


On the eve of the Civil War, the Regular Army of the United States was small, dispersed, untrained for large-scale operations, and woefully unprepared to suppress the rebellion of the secessionist states. Although the Regular Army expanded significantly during the war, reaching nearly sixty-seven thousand men, it was necessary to form an enormous army of state volunteers that overshadowed the Regulars and bore most of the combat burden. Nevertheless, the Regular Army played several critically important roles, notably providing leaders and exemplars for the Volunteers and managing the administration and logistics of the entire Union Army. In this first comprehensive study of the Regular Army in the Civil War, Clayton R. Newell and Charles R. Shrader focus primarily on the organizational history of the Regular Army and how it changed as an institution during the war, to emerge afterward as a reorganized and permanently expanded force. The eminent, award-winning military historian Edward M. Coffman provides a foreword.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Army History - Steven C Haack

[Of Duty Well and Faithfully Done] is a significant and useful work that should have a place in the library of every Civil war researcher."—Steven C Haack, Army History
Civil War Books and Authors

"Clayton Newell and Charles Shrader have created the literature's best one stop resource for the Regular Army in the Civil War."—Andrew Waggenhoffer, Civil War Books and Authors

— Andrew Waggenhoffer

Civil War Times

"If numbers, organization charts and statistical tables get your pulse racing, this history of the growth and development of the Regular Army during the war is for you. It will become the definitive study of an important, but too often overlooked, subject."—Gordon Berg, Civil War Times

— Gordon Berg

TOCWOC

"This is a careful examination and explanation of the army's departments, their functions, success and failures during the war. . . . The authors have a very sure hand, presenting information in a combination of text and tables each complementing the other. The book is full of nuggets of information that are both fun and informative. . . . If you wish to understand how the army worked, this is the book for you."—Brett Schulte, TOCWOC

— Brett Schulte

Strategy Page

'This is an absolutely essential work for any serious student of the military aspects of the Civil war or the history of the U.S. Army and of American warmaking."—A. A. Nofi, Strategy Page

— A. A. Nofi

Journal of America's Military Past

"Authors Newell and Shrader, both retired from the Army Center of Military History, have produced an important and useful work. The research is extensive, and their interpretations are well supported by relevant facts."—Roger D. Cunningham, Journal of America's Military Past

— Roger D. Cunningham

Civil War Times - Gordon Berg

"If numbers, organization charts and statistical tables get your pulse racing, this history of the growth and development of the Regular Army during the war is for you. It will become the definitive study of an important, but too often overlooked, subject."—Gordon Berg, Civil War Times
Civil War Books and Authors - Andrew Waggenhoffer

"Clayton Newell and Charles Shrader have created the literature's best one stop resource for the Regular Army in the Civil War."—Andrew Waggenhoffer, Civil War Books and Authors
TOCWOC - Brett Schulte

"This is a careful examination and explanation of the army's departments, their functions, success and failures during the war. . . . The authors have a very sure hand, presenting information in a combination of text and tables each complementing the other. The book is full of nuggets of information that are both fun and informative. . . . If you wish to understand how the army worked, this is the book for you."—Brett Schulte, TOCWOC
Strategy Page - A. A. Nofi

'This is an absolutely essential work for any serious student of the military aspects of the Civil war or the history of the U.S. Army and of American warmaking."—A. A. Nofi, Strategy Page
Journal of America's Military Past - Roger D. Cunningham

"Authors Newell and Shrader, both retired from the Army Center of Military History, have produced an important and useful work. The research is extensive, and their interpretations are well supported by relevant facts."—Roger D. Cunningham, Journal of America's Military Past
Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author


Both Clayton R. Newell and Charles R. Shrader finished their military careers as the chief of the historical services division at the U.S. Army Center of Military History and are now independent scholars and historical consultants. Newell is the author or editor of several books, including Lee vs. McClellan: The First Campaign; Shrader has also written or edited a number of books, including The Muslim-Croat Civil War in Central Bosnia: A Military History, 1991–1994. Edward M. Coffman, a professor emeritus of history at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, is the author of many works, including The Hilt of the Sword: The Career of Peyton C. March and The War to End All Wars: The American Military Experience in World War I.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 22, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A unique and valuable book!

    Prior to 1861, the United States Army is well under 20,000 soldiers most assigned to post in "Indian Territory". Promotion occurs when someone who outranks you dies. Food is bad; isolation breeds drinking, petty feuds and gossip is the major sports. With no retirement, Captains are in their 40s, Majors in their 50s, Colonels and Generals in their 60s or 70s. Many Field Grade Officers are to infirmed to go into the field. The General in Chief cannot ride a horse. Many officers have resigned their commission. Enlisted men desert at every opportunity.
    In 1864, the United States has an army of about one million soldiers concentrated in two major armies and several smaller ones. Food has improved. Pay is much better. There is a retirement system in place. Most Generals are the age of Captains in the old army. The officers that resigned their commissions are back in the ranks. While Bounty Jumpers are a major problem, desertion is down.
    This book looks at the role of the professional army during the Civil War. Along the way, we learn about army management and logistics. We come to understand the legal inconsistencies and political in fighting between the War Department, General-in-Chief, the Washington Staff and the armies in the field. It makes sense that in 1862 a Captain can tell General Grant "No" and get away with it. He is staff, Grant is field and Washington backs the staff officer right or wrong.
    This is not an easy read. It is not an exciting read full of battles, bugle calls and bullets. This is a careful examination and explanation of the army's departments, their functions, success and failures during the war. Tables abound, they are very well done and very necessary. The authors have a very sure hand, presenting information in a combination of text and tables each complementing the other. The book is full of nuggets of information that are both fun and informative. Even in the driest department discussion, I always found a nugget of information that linked to other reading. That is the real value of this book. It is the best explanation of how the army worked that I have seen. The information here will go into my papers and talks. If you wish to understand how the army worked, this is the book for you.
    After reading 192 pages on administration, you reach "The Army in the Field". This looks at the fighting these men did during the war. The chapter "Transition to War" covers the years leading up to the war. We see an army of professionals fighting Indians, Northern and Southern bound by shared experiences. We see the breaking of that bound and understand the emotions. The Infantry, The Cavalry, The Artillery and The Fight Bureaus cover the war. This is a regiment-by-regiment, battle by battle history. The regular army fought beside the volunteers in every theater and most of the major battles, at times playing a crucial role.
    Reflections on the Regular Army in the Civil War covers changing from an invading army to an army of occupation. The Civil War forever changed the army, this book is a look at what and who they were.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)