Of Temptation

Of Temptation

by John Owen
     
 

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John Owen was an English Nonconformist church leader and theologian in the 17th century. Owen also served as an administrator at the University of Oxford and today he is best known for his many Christian books that are still very popular today.

In Owen's book on temptation he describes the sources of sin and how to avoid them. This is considered a must read for all

Overview

John Owen was an English Nonconformist church leader and theologian in the 17th century. Owen also served as an administrator at the University of Oxford and today he is best known for his many Christian books that are still very popular today.

In Owen's book on temptation he describes the sources of sin and how to avoid them. This is considered a must read for all Christians in their struggle to fight the temptation of sin.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781500151416
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
06/10/2014
Pages:
122
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.26(d)

Meet the Author

John Owen (1616-1683) was an English Nonconformist church leader, theologian, and academic administrator at the University of Oxford. On 29 April he preached before the Long Parliament. In this sermon, and in his Country Essay for the Practice of Church Government, which he appended to it, his tendency to break away from Presbyterianism to the Independent or Congregational system is seen. Like John Milton, he saw little to choose between "new presbyter" and "old priest." He became pastor at Coggeshall in Essex, with a large influx of Flemish tradesmen. His adoption of Congregational principles did not affect his theological position, and in 1647 he again argued against Arminianism in The Death of Death in the Death of Christ, which drew him into long debate with Richard Baxter. He made the friendship of Fairfax while the latter was besieging Colchester, and addressed the army there against religious persecution. He was chosen to preach to parliament on the day after the execution of King Charles I, and succeeded in fulfilling his task without directly mentioning that event. Another sermon preached on 29 April, a plea for sincerity of religion in high places, won not only the thanks of parliament but the friendship of Oliver Cromwell, who took Owen to Ireland as his chaplain, that he might regulate the affairs of Trinity College, Dublin. He pleaded with the House of Commons for the religious needs of Ireland as some years earlier he had pleaded for those of Wales. In 1650 he accompanied Cromwell on his Scottish campaign. In March 1651, Cromwell, as Chancellor of Oxford University, gave him the deanery of Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford, and made him Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University in September 1652; in both offices he succeeded the Presbyterian, Edward Reynolds. During his eight years of official Oxford life Owen showed himself a firm disciplinarian, thorough in his methods, though, as John Locke testifies, the Aristotelian traditions in education underwent no change. With Philip Nye he unmasked the popular astrologer, William Lilly, and in spite of his share in condemning two Quakeresses to be whipped for disturbing the peace, his rule was not intolerant.

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