Office 2003 for Dummies

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Overview

If you have Microsoft Office 2003 For Dummies and just use it to create documents and for e-mail, that’s like having the ultimate gourmet kitchen and only cooking frozen dinners or having a 42” plasma high-definition, sound surround TV and only watching old reruns. This book will help you take control of Office 2003 and use it to take control of your life—at work or at home. It covers Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access. (Note that not all versions of Office 2003 have Access.) You’ll learn how to create ...

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Overview

If you have Microsoft Office 2003 For Dummies and just use it to create documents and for e-mail, that’s like having the ultimate gourmet kitchen and only cooking frozen dinners or having a 42” plasma high-definition, sound surround TV and only watching old reruns. This book will help you take control of Office 2003 and use it to take control of your life—at work or at home. It covers Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access. (Note that not all versions of Office 2003 have Access.) You’ll learn how to create all kinds of documents, set up and use databases, create spreadsheets and do all kinds of numerical calculations and computations, and present your creations in style. With detailed explanations and screen shots, this guide covers:

  • Creating, saving, opening, and printing any Office 2003 file
  • Getting comfortable with common Office 2003 commands, including using the menus and toolbars, working with the task pane, using multiple windows, and copying and pasting with Office Clipboard
  • The basics for working in Word, plus info on formatting your text or document, aligning text, adding headers, footers, or page numbers, adding and editing pictures, and more
  • Playing the numbers with Excel, with info on the basics of spreadsheets (numbers, labels, and formatting) and creating and editing formulas
  • Creating and manipulating charts—line, area, column, bar, and pie varieties
  • Creating PowerPoint presentations using AutoContent Wizard, a template, or from an existing presentation
  • Adding color, pictures, and transitions to jazz up your PowerPoint presentation
  • Getting organized with Outlook, including handling e-mail, organizing contact information, managing tasks with a to-do list, and scheduling appointments
  • Storing stuff in Access, with the basics on using a database, searching, sorting, and making queries, and creating reports

Microsoft Office 2003 For Dummies was written by Wallace Wang, the popular, bestselling author of more than 20 For Dummies computer books. It gives you a great overview and step-by-step how-to for the most common and most helpful functions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and Access. It’s a great guide to exploring the incredible powers at your fingertips with Microsoft Office 2003 and enhancing your productivity.  It’s also a great reference to keep handy so you can get a quick review of tasks you don’t often do or figure out more ways to use Office 2003 to make quick work of your work.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764538605
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 7/11/2003
  • Series: For Dummies Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 408
  • Sales rank: 1,394,153
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.18 (h) x 0.94 (d)

Meet the Author

Wallace Wang is the bestselling author of over 20 For Dummies computer books. He moonlights as a stand-up comic, and has appeared on A&E’s Evening At the Improv.

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Table of Contents

Introduction.

Part I: Getting to Know Microsoft Office.

Chapter 1: Playing with Office 2003 Files.

Chapter 2: Common Office 2003 Commands.

Chapter 3: Getting Help from Microsoft Office.

Chapter 4: Sharing Data.

Part II: Working with Word.

Chapter 5: Manipulating Your Words.

Chapter 6: Making Your Words Look Pretty.

Chapter 7: Creating Fancy Pages.

Part III: Playing the Numbers Game with Excel.

Chapter 8: The Basics of Spreadsheets: Numbers, Labels, and Formatting.

Chapter 9: Having Fun with Formulas and Functions.

Chapter 10: Charting Your Numbers.

Part IV: Making Presentations with PowerPoint.

Chapter 11: Creating a PowerPoint Presentation.

Chapter 12: Adding Color and Pictures to PowerPoint.

Chapter 13: Showing Off Your PowerPoint Presentations.

Part V: Getting Organized with Outlook.

Chapter 14: Organizing Your E-Mail.

Chapter 15: Setting Tasks and Making Contacts.

Chapter 16: Scheduling Your Time.

Part VI: Storing Stuff in Access.

Chapter 17: Using a Database.

Chapter 18: Searching, Sorting, and Making Queries.

Chapter 19: Making Reports.

Part VII: The Part of Tens.

Chapter 20: Ten Tips for Using Office 2003.

Chapter 21: Ten Common Microsoft Office 2003 Shortcuts.

Index.

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First Chapter

Office 2003 For Dummies

By Wallace Wang John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 0-7645-3860-8

Chapter One Playing with Office 2003 Files

In This Chapter

* Creating a new Office 2003 file

* Opening an Office 2003 file

* Creating a shortcut to a program or file

* Saving a file

* Closing a file

Microsoft Office consists of several programs, each designed to create and manipulate different types of data, such as words (Word), numbers (Excel), presentations (PowerPoint), and structured information (Access). Although the type of data each program uses may differ, the general procedure for creating and opening a file remains the same.

So this chapter teaches you how to create, save, open, and print any Office 2003 file, no matter which Office program you may be using. After you figure out the standard ways to create and use different Office 2003 files, you can focus on doing something useful with your data, rather than tearing your hair out, trying to figure out how to do something as seemingly simple as printing a file.

Creating a New Office 2003 File

When you want to create a new Office 2003 file, you have two choices:

  •   Create a completely empty file.
  •   Create a file (such as a résumé or a sales invoice) from a template, which provides a basic design that you can use to format and arrange your data automatically.

Creating a blank file

A blank file can be useful if youneed to customize the formatting yourself, but it may take time to do so. A file created from a template can help you format your data quickly,but may not always be formatted in the way you really want it. The more you use Office 2003, the more you'll find that you probably need to create both blank files and files from a template at one time or another.

Loading a program to create a blank file

Every time you start Word, Excel, or PowerPoint, that program automatically creates a blank file for you. To load one of these programs and create a blank file, follow these steps:

1. Click the Start button on the taskbar.

The Start menu appears.

2. Click All Programs.

The Programs menu appears.

3. Click the program that you want to use, such as Microsoft Word or Microsoft PowerPoint.

The program you choose appears with a blank file ready for you to use.

Creating a blank file within a program

If you have already loaded Word, Excel, or PowerPoint and want to create a blank file, choose one of these two methods:

  •   Click the New icon on the Standard toolbar
  •   Press Ctrl+N

The result is shown in Figure 1-1.

After you choose either of these options, your Office 2003 program creates a blank file for you to use.

If you choose File[right arrow]New from any Office program, the Office task pane appears, which lets you create either a blank file or a file based on a template. (See the section below, "Using a template stored on your computer.")

Creating a file from a template

After you have loaded Word, Excel, PowerPoint, or Access, you can create a new file based on a template. Templates act like cookie cutters for your data. The template provides predefined formatting for your data in the shape of résumés, business letters, invoice reports, or business plans so that you just have to type in data and print out your file.

You can find templates in two locations: on your computer and on Microsoft's template Web page.

Using a template stored on your computer

When you install Office 2003, the program stores a bunch of templates on your computer for you automatically. The problem is finding them again. If you have already loaded an Office 2003 program, such as Access or PowerPoint, you can load a template by following these steps:

1. Click File]right arrow]New.

The New task pane appears on the right side of the window as shown in Figure 1-2.

2. Click the On my computer link under the Templates category.

A Templates dialog box appears as shown in Figure 1-3.

3. Click a template to use and then click OK.

Office 2003 loads your chosen template. Now all you have to do is add your own data to create an instant document.

Downloading a template from the Internet

In case you can't find what you're looking for among the limited number of templates stored on your computer, you can also download templates from the Internet.

To download templates from the Microsoft template Web site, you need an Internet connection.

To download a template, follow these steps:

1. Click File]right arrow]New.

The task pane appears on the right side of the window (see Figure 1-2).

2. Click the Templates on Office Online link.

The Microsoft Templates Web page appears as shown in Figure 1-4, listing different categories to choose from, such as Calendars and Planners or Meetings and Projects.

3. Click a template name under a specific category, such as the Calendars and Planning category.

The Templates Web page lists all the available templates you can choose.

4. Click a template that you want to use.

The Templates Web page displays the format for your chosen template, so that you can see how the template formats data, as shown in Figure 1-5.

5. Click the Download Now button.

Office 2003 downloads your chosen template and displays it in the appropriate program, such as Word or Excel. At this point you can start typing in your own data and save your file.

Opening an Existing File

You'll probably spend more time opening and editing existing files than creating brand-new files from scratch. The most common way to open a file is to load the program you want to run (such as Excel or Access) and then open the file you want to use. A second, faster way involves opening the file you want to use, which automatically loads the program needed to edit that file.

You can open multiple files within each Office 2003 program (with the exception of Outlook and Access). So if you load Microsoft Word, you can open your résumé file, your letter of resignation file, your business report file, and your love letter file all at the same time. In general, it's a good idea to only open those files you need to use at the time and then close those files you don't need right now, because the more files you have open, the less memory your computer has for working with any other programs that you may have running at the moment.

Opening an Office file right away

If you want to open a specific Office file, you must first find that particular file and then double-click on it to open both the file and the Office program that created it. To do this, follow these steps:

1. Click the Start button on the taskbar.

The Start menu appears.

2. Click All Programs]right arrow]Accessories]right arrow]Windows Explorer.

The Windows Explorer window appears.

3. Double-click the file that you want to open.

If the file you want to open is buried in another folder or even on another drive, you may have to dig through the different folders stored on your computer. For more information about using the Windows Explorer, pick up a copy of Windows XP For Dummies by Andy Rathbone.

To help you find a file quickly, click the Search button in the Windows Explorer window.

Once Office loads your file and the program that created it, such as Excel or PowerPoint, you can start editing the information.

Opening an Office file within a program

If you are already running a particular Office program, such as Word or Excel, you can open an existing file by following these steps:

1. Choose one of the following:

Click File[right arrow]Open Press Ctrl+O

Click the Open icon on the Standard toolbar

Whichever method you chose, an Open dialog box appears.

2. Click the file that you want to open.

If the file you want to open is buried in another folder or even on another drive, click in the Look In list box and choose a different drive or folder, such as Local Disk (C:) or the My Documents folder.

3. Click Open.

Office loads your file into your currently running program.

Office allows you to open multiple files so that you can quickly switch back and forth between the files you need at the moment.

Taking a Shortcut

Rather than wade through multiple menus or the less than intuitive Windows Explorer, you can create shortcuts to your favorite Office programs or files. You can put these shortcuts directly on your Windows desktop or on the Start menu. That way, you can just double-click the shortcut and go to the program or file you want right away.

A shortcut is nothing more than an icon that represents a specific file. This file can be an actual program (such as Microsoft Word) or a file created by another program (such as your résumé written in Word).

Putting a shortcut on the desktop

To place a shortcut of a program or file on the Windows desktop, follow these steps:

1. Close or minimize any programs you have running so that you can see the Windows desktop.

You can see the Windows desktop quickly if you right-click on the Windows Start bar at the bottom of the screen and when a pop-up menu appears, click Show the Desktop.

2. Right-click the mouse on the Windows desktop.

A pop-up menu appears, as shown in Figure 1-6.

3. Choose New]right arrow]Shortcut.

4. Click the Browse button.

A Browse For Folder dialog box appears.

5. Locate the Microsoft Office program or file that you want to place on your Windows desktop.

For example, if you want to put a shortcut to Excel on the Windows desktop, look for the Excel icon. By default, Microsoft Office XP stores its program files in the C:\\Program Files\\Microsoft Office\\ Office11 folder.

To help you decipher the cryptic names Microsoft gives its programs, here's a table you can refer to:

Program Icon Name Displayed in the Browse Dialog Box

Access Msaccess

Excel Excel

Outlook Outlook

PowerPoint Powerpnt

Word Winword

6. Click a program icon, such as Mspub or Powerpnt, or a file and click Open.

The Create Shortcut dialog box appears again.

7. Click Next.

The Create Shortcut dialog box asks you for a descriptive name for your desktop icon. If you don't type a name, Windows uses the program icon name by default, such as Msaccess or Winword.

8. Type a descriptive name for your program or file, such as Microsoft Word or Letter of Resignation, and click Finish.

The Windows desktop appears with your chosen shortcut on the desktop. Shortcuts are easy to spot because they have a little black-and-white arrow in the lower-left corner.

9. Double-click your shortcut to run the program or load your file.

If you want to delete a shortcut icon from your desktop, right-click it and choose Delete from the pop-up menu.

Putting a program shortcut on the Start menu

The Start menu lists your most recently used programs for easy access. However, you might want to store shortcuts to your favorite programs on the Start menu yourself. To do this, follow these steps:

1. Click the Start button.

The Start menu appears.

2. Click All Programs.

A pop-up menu appears.

3. Click Microsoft Office.

A pop-up menu appears that lists all the Microsoft Office programs available.

4. Right-click the program you want to store on the Start menu.

A pop-up menu appears, as shown in Figure 1-7.

5. Click the Pin to Start menu command.

Your chosen program appears as a shortcut icon on the Start menu.

If you ever want to delete a shortcut icon from the Start menu, right-click that icon and then click the Remove from This List command from the pop-up menu.

Saving a File

Unless you want to keep typing the same data into your computer over and over again, you should save your files. If you create a new file and then save it, you need to specify a name for your file and a location where you want to store it, such as on your hard drive or in a specific folder, such as the My Documents folder. When you edit an existing file, Office 2003 simply saves your data in the current file.

To save a file, just choose one of the following:

  •   Click File[right arrow]Save.
  •   Click the Save icon on the Standard toolbar, as shown in Figure 1-8.
  •   Press Ctrl+S.

You should save your data periodically while you're working, such as every ten minutes or whenever you take a break and walk away from your computer. That way, if the power suddenly goes out, your hard disk crashes, or something else goes horribly wrong with your computer, you lose only a little bit of the data you typed in since the last time you saved your file.

For extra security, save a copy of your file on removable media such as a floppy disk or a rewritable CD, then store that removable media in a separate location away from your computer. That way if a fire, flood, or other type of disaster wipes out your computer, you'll (hopefully) be able to recover your data on your removable media later.

Closing a File

After you open a file to edit or add new data, you eventually have to close that file again so that you can do something else with your life besides use Microsoft Office 2003. There are two ways to close a file:

  •   Click File[right arrow]Close in case you want to stop editing a specific file but still want to keep using Office 2003.

If you have multiple files open in the same program, such as multiple Word documents, you can close them all at the same time if you hold down the Shift key and then click File[right arrow]Close All. The Close All command only appears when you hold down the Shift key.

  •   Click File[right arrow]Exit

For a fast way to close a file and the program that created it, click the Close box of the program window. (The Close box is a little box with an X in it, which appears in the upper-right corner of a program window.)

Continues...

Excerpted from Office 2003 For Dummies by Wallace Wang Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2014

    Highly recommend.

    Just what I wanted to be able to check an older version of Office.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 11, 2006

    Too many useless comments

    I was never that fond of 'dummy' books, but this is one of the worst. There are too many time wasting jokes and interruptions when you are just trying to learn the processes. I would recommend a more serious and adult exploration of technical subjects.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2009

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    Posted February 18, 2009

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