Offshoring IT: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Overview

Reverend Bill Blunden tells all: who’s going offshore, who’s helping them do it, and why. In addition to presenting the pro-globalization stance of corporate America, Reverend Blunden gives voice to dissenting opinions that have largely been ignored by the media. This book offers an enlightening, detailed analysis of the offshore outsourcing phenomenon, and exposes the underlying core values of America’s economic and political system.

Blunden has been directly affected by ...

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Overview

Reverend Bill Blunden tells all: who’s going offshore, who’s helping them do it, and why. In addition to presenting the pro-globalization stance of corporate America, Reverend Blunden gives voice to dissenting opinions that have largely been ignored by the media. This book offers an enlightening, detailed analysis of the offshore outsourcing phenomenon, and exposes the underlying core values of America’s economic and political system.

Blunden has been directly affected by offshoring, and writes from the programmer's point of view—for the programmer. While Blunden is passionate about the topic, he and the editor ensure that this book presents both sides of the issue, and appeals to all readers.

Table of Contents

  1. Setting the Stage
  2. Measuring the Trend
  3. The Offshoring Obstacle Course
  4. Arguments in Favor of Offshoring
  5. Arguments Against Offshoring
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590593967
  • Publisher: Apress
  • Publication date: 7/30/2004
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 152
  • Product dimensions: 0.33 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 6.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Reverend Bill Blunden is an alumnus of Cornell University, where he earned a bachelor of arts degree in physics. He also holds a master of science degree in operations research from Case Western Reserve University in Ohio. Reverend Blunden is an ordained SubGenius minister, and is currently at large in California's Bay Area.
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Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Setting the stage 1
Ch. 2 Measuring the trend 21
Ch. 3 The offshoring obstacle course 53
Ch. 4 Arguments in favor of offshoring 81
Ch. 5 Arguments against offshoring 97
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2004

    A common attitude but misguided

    In general, do you think cheaper prices are good or bad? That is a basic counterpoint to this book. Offshoring is happening because those companies practising it can often charge lower prices for their goods or services. To the benefit of their customers. If you are in IT, which is a reasonable guess, because you are considering this book, then you certainly have heard of Moore's Law. Plus there has been an accompanying vast fall in the cost of bandwidth, during the last 20 years. You have probably benefited from both trends. If you've bought any computer equipment, then you have certainly done so. Yes, it has been rough on some hardware vendors, who have gone out of business. But overall, it has greatly expanded the market for both computer hardware and software, and thusly the market for your services. If you have no complaints about benefiting from cheaper hardware, why should you complain if your software position is under threat from cheaper programmers offshore? Blunden supplies many tables and numbers in his book, to buttress his viewpoints. He talks about the greed of corporations who do offshoring. But he never posits why offshoring is happening now? Why not 10 or 20 years ago? It's certainly not because CEOs then were less greedy. But it's because the underlying hardware and bandwidth improvements have reached a tipping point, whereby it is now economically advantageous for offshoring of services. He does point out that some manufacturing has moved overseas. But in IT, this offshoring has been happening since the early 90s. When fabrication of commodity chips and motherboards started migrating. Yes, some US hardware engineers then lost their jobs. Do you lament for them? That migration helped Dell and others offer ever-cheaper computers. Blunden is a smart bloke, and he is surely well aware of all this. But even if you agree with his book, you should note that it ends weakly, with very tepid suggestions on how to reverse offshoring. The fundamental reason is that Moore's Law and the falling of bandwidth costs are still proceeding unabated. Technological innovations are still happening. In other words, services offshoring has barely begun. Don't fall into the trap of thinking that offshoring is going away. That would be like an accountant circa 1980, when the first spreadsheets appeared on PCs, dismissing it as a fad. Whereas he would compute his spreadsheets manually, using only a calculator. In such a situation, it was the marginal cost of his labour, against the marginal cost of running a software spreadsheet, which even then was close to zero. (Once you bought the PC and software.) This book is instructive. Ten or 20 years from now, it will capture perfectly a common if misguided attitude of our time. It will be worth studying then, in a course on history or economics. You don't think so? Then try searching for books on the awesome Japanese juggernaut, and how their economic model was going to overtake the inferior American economy. There were a spate of such books in the late 80s. You can't find these in bookstores now. Out of print and discredited. So too will be the fate of this book.

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