Oh, Grow Up!: Poems to Help You Survive Parents, Chores, School, and Other Afflictions

Oh, Grow Up!: Poems to Help You Survive Parents, Chores, School, and Other Afflictions

by Florence Parry Heide, Roxanne H. Pierce, Nadine Bernard Westcott
     
 

Anyone who is (or who has ever been) a child knows all too well that growing up can be a challenge. Here is everything kids have always wanted to know (but adults may not have told them!) about how to cope with parents, chores, older sisters and younger brothers, the school cafeteria, the class bully, and more. Whether one is faced with wearing braces or wearing… See more details below

Overview

Anyone who is (or who has ever been) a child knows all too well that growing up can be a challenge. Here is everything kids have always wanted to know (but adults may not have told them!) about how to cope with parents, chores, older sisters and younger brothers, the school cafeteria, the class bully, and more. Whether one is faced with wearing braces or wearing hand-me-downs, these witty, tongue-in-cheek poems point the way to survival with glee and gusto. Full color.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Dealing with annoying circumstances can try the patience of even a saintly child, but this droll collection from Heide (Tales for the Perfect Child) and her daughter is bound to fortify young readers suffering the slings and arrows of outrageous childhood. "I only have one life to live," laments the narrator of a poem titled "Advice," but "my parents want to live it." Another says, "I used to hate sharing./ Now it seems good./ I share my chores-/ I think everyone should." Westcott's (Never Take a Pig to Lunch and Other Poems About the Fun of Eating) waggish, detailed watercolors provide more than half the book's amusement. As fit punishment for a sister who hogs the bathroom plucking her eyebrows, Westcott depicts the younger brother camping out in the bathtub in full snorkeling regalia. Although the poems' rhythms and rhymes are sometimes uneven, both text and art focus on children of good humor and high energy who cleverly cope with familiar ordeals. Whether these narrators are being grounded or outnumbered, their complaints are earnest rather than churlish, heartfelt rather than whiny, and always full of fun. Ages 4-8. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Leslie Verzi Julian
The essence of childhood drudgery has been captured in these delightful, rhythmic lines. Whether you are a child or not, you will laugh at the truth behind these words. The poetry will help you cope with being a middle child, doing chores, baby-sitting, wearing hand-me-downs, and listening to teachers and parents. The illustrations will help you to laugh at yourself and the world that surrounds you.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 2-5A lighthearted look at everyday family life from a child's point of view. Calamities such as sibling rivalry, class bullies, hand-me-downs, school cafeteria food, and a host of other trials and tribulations are captured in the jaunty rhyming verses. First-person narrations bring immediacy to the poems and lets readers identify with the typical situations. Zany, candy-bright pen-and-ink and watercolor cartoons amplify the absurdities. Right on target for school-aged youngsters.Sally R. Dow, Ossining Public Library, NY
Carolyn Phelan
Brothers, sisters, braces, hand-me-downs, fancy restaurants, parental advice, school cafeteria food, and other facets of growing up are viewed from a child's perspective. Most of these humorous rhymes end with a clever twist, or a bit of irony. After a boy details all the faults his little sister finds with her lunch, the poem ends with this stanza: "The Popsicle is too ice-cold, she whined and sulked and cried. I put it in the microwave/ she's "still" not satisfied." Fresh, lively, and wildly colorful, Westcott's line-and-watercolor artwork illustrates the book with pictures as bright and buoyant as the verse.
Kirkus Reviews
Twenty-nine funny poems about the everyday indignities of childhood, from braces and hand-me-downs to the rigors of family and school life: "Could anything be drearier/than the food in the school cafeteria?" Westcott's bright, zany ink-and-watercolor illustrations and hand-lettered titles get right into the poems, sometimes encasing lines in dialogue balloons, sometimes adding an extra element to the drama, as in "Danger: Overload," in which a busy mother fires a list of chores at her daughter, who then gets them hopelessly mixed up. The illustration of this debacle shows that the daughter has been wearing headphones and listening to music the whole time: "No wonder that I got confused—/my mother, though, is not amused."

Fans of Shel Silverstein and Jack Prelutsky will find plenty to like in these mother/daughter collaborations.

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780531087718
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
03/28/1996
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.06(w) x 11.32(h) x 0.37(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >