Oil Addiction

Overview

Totally addicted to oil, Man in his industrial adventure has transformed nearly all the Earth's ecosystems into "egosystems" designed to serve only his own needs and desires, at the expense of all other species. He persists despite the irreversible damage he is causing to the environment. He has already disrupted the Earth's thermostats.

Western society has reached the "Age of Excess," which will last only as long as there is still fossil energy to fuel it. The Earth cannot keep...

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Overview

Totally addicted to oil, Man in his industrial adventure has transformed nearly all the Earth's ecosystems into "egosystems" designed to serve only his own needs and desires, at the expense of all other species. He persists despite the irreversible damage he is causing to the environment. He has already disrupted the Earth's thermostats.

Western society has reached the "Age of Excess," which will last only as long as there is still fossil energy to fuel it. The Earth cannot keep up with Man's demand for natural resources. Her hydrocarbon reserves are shrinking rapidly and by 2010, global production will begin to decrease, setting off a period of unprecedented planetary disorder and turmoil.

Today the United States must import most of the oil it needs from faraway countries. Therein lies a terrible paradox: the power of America is rooted in dependency! The free enterprise system that it is imposing on the rest of the world cannot solve this paradoxical situation; it will only amplify it and hasten destabilization.

It is high time to wonder whether we in the West, in our suicidal quest for energy, are not running the risk of losing control of the course of our history. The invasion of Iraq by the United States military, in lockstep with American corporations, is a distressing and reprehensible step in this direction.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781581124941
  • Publisher: Universal-Publishers.com
  • Publication date: 10/15/2004
  • Pages: 252
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.50 (h) x 0.57 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 9, 2005

    An informative and important book, well written

    The author tells how our addiction to oil evolved, like the beginning of any bad habit, with a small appetite for oil ¿ there was less than one car per household - and a large supply of oil in the U.S. As more was found throughout the world, we perceived an inexhaustible supply of oil and used it accordingly, developing an addiction to this black fluid. As we used up our domestic supply, we naturally looked to the region of great potential: the Middle East. He describes our forays to mine and distribute those untapped oil supplies and the power struggle for the rights to this oil. He quotes Henry Kissinger, ¿Oil is too important a commodity to be left to the Arabs.¿ One of the nice features of this well written book is the author¿s frequent use of visual illustrations. For example, he describes how many barrels of oil are needed to fly a person across the Atlantic, and what the world¿s daily oil production would look like if it were a river: like the Seine flowing through Paris. He compares the future global outlook for oil with the history of the rise and demise of the sardine industry in Monterey. The supply of sardines was once viewed as inexhaustible. There is much more in this very readable book, bringing the reader up to the U.S. invasion of Iraq in 2001 and its oil implications.

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