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Ojibwa: Wild Rice Gatherers
     

Ojibwa: Wild Rice Gatherers

by Therese DeAngelis
 

Through beautiful paintings and photography, the America's First Peoples series brings young readers into the unique cultures of American Indian tribes and nations. These books take a close look at rich traditions that helped shape the lives of American Indians in the past and into the present.

When the Ojibwa people reached the Great Lakes after a long journey,

Overview

Through beautiful paintings and photography, the America's First Peoples series brings young readers into the unique cultures of American Indian tribes and nations. These books take a close look at rich traditions that helped shape the lives of American Indians in the past and into the present.

When the Ojibwa people reached the Great Lakes after a long journey, they found a plant they had never before seen. Its tall stalks floated on top of the water. The plant was wild rice, and the Ojibwa soon learned that the rice was delicious to eat. They decided to make this place "where food grows on water" their new home. In time, wild rice became an important part of the Ojibwa way of life.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Although the Ojibwa people, also called the Chippewa, once lived along the Atlantic coast, they moved to the Great Lakes area in search of the megis shell, a small white shell that the people used, among other things, for trade. Along the Great Lakes they found wild rice growing, which became a staple for the Ojibwa. Beginning in late summer, the Ojibwa began harvesting wild rice from the lakes. They carefully dried the rice, then parched it to loosen the outer shell. Next they sifted the rice to separate the chaff. They stored rice, along with dried berries and other fruits and vegetables, for the winter, supplementing their diet with animals and fish. Today the Ojibwa still gather wild rice, make maple syrup and preserve their traditions. Part of the "America's First Peoples" series, this book includes enrichment activities, such as making a wild rice breakfast and crafting a dream catcher, that expose the reader to everyday life of the Ojibwa in tangible ways. Additional references, including places to write and visit both in person and on the Internet, are included. Through is emphasis on crafts and social life, this book will supplement and complement history texts on Native American history. 2003, Blue Earth Books/Capstone Press, Patterson

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780736815376
Publisher:
Capstone Press
Publication date:
01/01/2003
Series:
America's First Peoples Series
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.94(w) x 9.80(h) x 0.33(d)
Age Range:
6 - 9 Years

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