×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

The Old Dog
     

The Old Dog

by Charlotte Zolotow, James Ransome (Illustrator)
 

See All Formats & Editions

Once there was a dog who loved to run and jump and play. She was the best friend Ben — or any little boy — could have. But as Ben got older, so did his dog. One morning, Ben's old dog didn't open her eyes or wag her tail. She didn't even move.

Charlotte Zolotow's remarkable insight into a universal experience — the hurt and confusion a child feels

Overview

Once there was a dog who loved to run and jump and play. She was the best friend Ben — or any little boy — could have. But as Ben got older, so did his dog. One morning, Ben's old dog didn't open her eyes or wag her tail. She didn't even move.

Charlotte Zolotow's remarkable insight into a universal experience — the hurt and confusion a child feels after his first encounter with death — is poignantly echoed by James Ransome's striking oil paintings.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
K-Gr 2In this newly illustrated edition of a 1972 title (Coward, o.p.), a young boy's old dog dies one morning. The day passes slowly and sadly as the child comes to understand the loneliness created by such a loss. At the height of his grief, the mood quickly changes to joy as his father brings home a new puppy to love. The large, bold type and simple vocabulary and sentence structure make the book ideal for beginning readers. The text captures the boy's pain, despite the flaw of an easy (albeit happy) final solution. Dense oil paintings rendered in fall colors of orange, brown, and green use many closeups to keep the book's focus on emotions. Ransome is masterful at showing the African American child's feelings, and his richly hued illustrations capture the intensity of his grief. The borders of fall leaves are lovely, if a bit cliched, but all in all, this is a worthy purchase.Martha Topol, Northwestern Michigan College, Traverse City, MI
Hazel Rochman
First published in 1972, Zolotow's elemental story about a boy whose dog dies is newly illustrated here with rich oil paintings. The words are simple, quietly describing the fact of death and Ben's grief: "Ben looked at his dog, but she didn't look back. She just lay still." At first Ben is numb; then he cries, but there's no old dog to comfort him. Ransome's pictures in glowing fall colors show close-up portraits of a loving African American family in their home and tree-lined neighborhood. The dog's absence is an overwhelming physical reality; she's there in a full-page close-up, as Ben remembers her. Then Ben's father brings home a new white-and-black puppy to love. Each left-hand page has a panel with a changing pattern of sunlit autumn leaves, an expressive image for an unsentimental story about connection and loss and renewal.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060244095
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
07/28/1995
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 8.75(h) x 0.32(d)
Lexile:
250L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Charlotte Zolotow—author, editor, publisher, and educator—has one of the most distinguished reputations in the field of children's literature. She has written more than seventy books, many of which are picture-book classics, such as Mr. Rabbit and the Lovely Present and William's Doll. She lives in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York.

James Ransome's work has appeared in nearly fifty books for children, including Uncle Jed's Barbershop, a Coretta Scott King Honor Book, and This Is the Dream. His highly acclaimed illustrations for Let My People Go: Bible Stories Told by a Freeman of Color won the NAACP Image Award. He teaches illustration at Syracuse University and lives in Rhinebeck, New York, with his family.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews