Old Turtle and the Broken Truth

( 7 )

Overview


Powerhouse team Douglas Wood and Jon J Muth present a sequel to Old Turtle, the award-winning wisdom tale of peace and love for the earth.

In this profoundly moving fable, the earth & all its creatures are suffering, for the people will not share their Truth, which gives them happiness & power, with those who are different from them. Then one brave Little Girl seeks the wisdom of the ancient Old Turtle, who sees that the people's Truth is not a whole truth, but broken. ...

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Overview


Powerhouse team Douglas Wood and Jon J Muth present a sequel to Old Turtle, the award-winning wisdom tale of peace and love for the earth.

In this profoundly moving fable, the earth & all its creatures are suffering, for the people will not share their Truth, which gives them happiness & power, with those who are different from them. Then one brave Little Girl seeks the wisdom of the ancient Old Turtle, who sees that the people's Truth is not a whole truth, but broken. Old Turtle shows the girl the missing part of the Truth, & the Little Girl returns with it to her people. Then the pieces are brought together, and the broken Truth is made whole at last: YOU ARE LOVED...AND SO ARE THEY. Then the people & the earth are healed.

Earth is full of suffering and war until one little girl seeks Old Turtle, who tells her about a "broken truth" and how mending it will help her community to understand the common bond of all humanity.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Sage Old Turtle gives his wisdom about Broken Truth and mending suffering in this stunning, deep, and thought-provoking picture book by Douglas Wood, illustrated by Jon J. Muth. Drenched in Muth's pale watercolors that glow with ancient knowledge and Asian inspiration, this gentle tale tells the story of a Broken Truth that falls to earth and eventually creates trouble for humanity. After a man finds the Broken Truth laying on the ground, he takes it to his people, who start "to feel fear or even anger toward those who were not like themselves and did not share their truth." They begin waging battles with others who want the truth as well, and soon, a confused girl decides to ask Old Turtle how to solve the problem. The old fellow gives her a mysterious stone, along with advice about "seeking out those small and simple truths" and "listening once more to the language of breezes, by learning lessons from stones and animals and trees and stars." When she returns to her people, the girl passes along these words and combines the stone with the Broken Truth, creating a heartfelt message that puts humanity back at ease. Both sophisticated and magnificently rendered, this touch-of-Buddhism book will have children and adults realizing that beauty lies in the simple things around us and in our hearts. Matt Warner
From the Publisher

School Library Journal
(December 1, 2003; 0-439-32109School Library Journal
(December 1, 2003; 0-439-32109-3)

Gr 4 Up-A truth falls from the sky and breaks in half. "One of the pieces blazed off through the night sky,/and the other fell to earth in the beautiful land." Several animals discard the broken piece because they feel that "there is something missing." When a human finds it, he is delighted, for it says, "You are loved." He reveals this truth to others "whose faces look like his." They begin to ignore the earth's beauty, to fear those who do not "share their truth," and to fight continually with those "others" who wish to possess it. Finally, a girl who embarks on a difficult journey to seek the advice of Old Turtle helps the people see that there is not just one truth, but "truths all around us, and within us" and that the second half of the broken truth is "And so are they." Muth's watercolor-and-ink illustrations powerfully reflect the moods evoked by the lyrical text. The humans are depicted as black, Giacometti-like silhouettes surrounded by darkness above and below. These same people form a rainbow-hued chain as they begin to see themselves in one another. The beautiful text and illustrations printed on wonderfully thick paper make a lovely package, and while the message, similar to Mem Fox's Feathers and Fools (Harcourt, 1996), is a difficult one for young children to grasp, it is sure to spark discussion among older students.-Marianne Saccardi, Norwalk Community College, CT Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.

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Booklist
(November 15, 2003; 0-439-32109-3)

K-Gr. 2. Old Turtle was a phenomenon, and many found its message inspirational. This sequel features the same gorgeous, shimmering watercolors as the earlier book, and, unfortunately, the same pretentious pieties. In a land where every stone was a teacher . . and every tree a ladder to the stars, a truth falls, and breaks into parts. Various creatures find the broken truth, and one, a man, takes its message, You Are Loved, to heart. So do other people, who fear and fight those who are not like themselves and do not share their truth. A little girl comes to Old Turtle to ask how to stop the suffering in the world, and he tells her how to make the truth whole. Next to the broken half, You Are Loved, the child places the rest of the shining truth, which reads And So Are They. Turtle has many fans, so expect an audience for this easy lesson in solving the world's problems. --GraceAnne DeCandido Copyright 2003 Booklist

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Publishers Weekly
(October 27, 2003; 0-439-32109-3)

In this handsome but overwrought sequel to Wood's Old Turtle (illus. by Cheng-Khee Chee), "a truth" falls from the sky and breaks in two. One half vanishes; the other (bearing the words "You Are Loved") is rejected by the animal kingdom because a part of it is missing." A human snaps it up and shares it with those "who spoke as he spoke and dressed as he dressed and whose faces looked like his." Eventually, the humans' faulty "Truth" inspires "anger toward those who were not like themselves," and war breaks out. Finally, a girl asks Old Turtle for help and returns to her people both with wisdom ("Every person, every being, is important, and... the world was made for each of us") and a special stone-the missing half of the broken truth. Repaired, the whole truth forms a golden heart, which reads, "You Are Loved and So Are They." Wood's fulsome prose ("She had... crossed the Mountains of Imagining and the River of Wondering Why, had found her way through the Forest of Finding Out") and heavy-handed message stand out in sharp contrast to the simplicity and subtle lyricism of Muth's (The Three Questions) semi-abstract watercolors. From his exquisite animal portraits to the saturated colors, striking

Publishers Weekly
In this handsome but overwrought sequel to Wood's Old Turtle (illus. by Cheng-Khee Chee), "a truth" falls from the sky and breaks in two. One half vanishes; the other (bearing the words "You Are Loved") is rejected by the animal kingdom because a part of it is missing." A human snaps it up and shares it with those "who spoke as he spoke and dressed as he dressed and whose faces looked like his." Eventually, the humans' faulty "Truth" inspires "anger toward those who were not like themselves," and war breaks out. Finally, a girl asks Old Turtle for help and returns to her people both with wisdom ("Every person, every being, is important, and... the world was made for each of us") and a special stone-the missing half of the broken truth. Repaired, the whole truth forms a golden heart, which reads, "You Are Loved and So Are They." Wood's fulsome prose ("She had... crossed the Mountains of Imagining and the River of Wondering Why, had found her way through the Forest of Finding Out") and heavy-handed message stand out in sharp contrast to the simplicity and subtle lyricism of Muth's (The Three Questions) semi-abstract watercolors. From his exquisite animal portraits to the saturated colors, striking interplay of light and shadow and dreamy, memorable images, the artist's work reflects a depth of emotion absent from the text. Ages 5-up. (Oct.) FYI: For each copy sold through the U.S. trade market, the publisher will donate $1 to First Book, a national organization that provides books to needy children. Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
In this pretentious but well-meaning sequel of sorts to Wood's Old Turtle (Scholastic, 2001), a truth splits as it falls to the beautiful earth, in a time when "every stone was a teacher and every breeze a language/where every lake was a mirror and every tree a ladder to the stars." The half truth is picked up by a succession of animals. But each finds the broken or partial truth unpalatable, difficult to carry, and unsparkling, until a human picks it up and reads, "You Are Loved." The man cherishes this thought and gradually his descendents cease to hear the language of the breezes and stones, but only pay attention to their partial truth as The Truth. Battles ensue as humans struggle to possess this Truth. Elsewhere, a little girl, who has traveled far crossing the Mountains of Imagining and the River of Wondering Why into the Forest of Finding Out, asks Old Turtle to explain it all and through her (page after page of) explanations, the little girl comes to see that what has been missing is the Truth's other half: "And So Are They." It's unlikely that elementary age children will have the patience to sit through all of this. Yet, if they do, the extended metaphor of "Do onto others..." or "Love thy neighbor as thyself" is not beyond their grasp. While several of Muth's watercolors are breathtaking, others seem hastily or unevenly executed at best, and their narrative quality is slight. Readers who enjoy extended metaphor and message embedded in fable and those who found Wood's first book compellingly spiritual will respond favorably to this empurpled prose, but those who expect a crisp story will be disappointed. A portion of the proceeds from this book will benefit First Book, anational nonprofit organization dedicated to providing books to children in need. 2003, Scholastic, Ages 7 to 10.
—Susan Hepler, Ph.D.
School Library Journal
Gr 4 Up-A truth falls from the sky and breaks in half. "One of the pieces blazed off through the night sky,/and the other fell to earth in the beautiful land." Several animals discard the broken piece because they feel that "there is something missing." When a human finds it, he is delighted, for it says, "You are loved." He reveals this truth to others "whose faces look like his." They begin to ignore the earth's beauty, to fear those who do not "share their truth," and to fight continually with those "others" who wish to possess it. Finally, a girl who embarks on a difficult journey to seek the advice of Old Turtle helps the people see that there is not just one truth, but "truths all around us, and within us" and that the second half of the broken truth is "And so are they." Muth's watercolor-and-ink illustrations powerfully reflect the moods evoked by the lyrical text. The humans are depicted as black, Giacometti-like silhouettes surrounded by darkness above and below. These same people form a rainbow-hued chain as they begin to see themselves in one another. The beautiful text and illustrations printed on wonderfully thick paper make a lovely package, and while the message, similar to Mem Fox's Feathers and Fools (Harcourt, 1996), is a difficult one for young children to grasp, it is sure to spark discussion among older students.-Marianne Saccardi, Norwalk Community College, CT Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780439321099
  • Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
  • Publication date: 10/1/2003
  • Pages: 64
  • Sales rank: 103,147
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: 620L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 9.28 (w) x 10.36 (h) x 0.43 (d)

Meet the Author


Music, books, and nature are three prominent themes in Wood’s life. Though he started as a poor reader in elementary school, his second grade teacher, Miss Little, instilled in him a life-long love of books and reading. Raised in a family of musicians, Doug grew up playing violin and piano. In teaching himself to play guitar and banjo, and write songs, he found his own personal form of musical expression.
One of the North Country’s most experienced wilderness experts, Douglas Wood makes his home by the Mississippi River in rural Minnesota.

Jon J Muth has written and illustrated many enchanting picture books, including his Caldecott Honor Book ZEN SHORTS and its sequel, the NEW YORK TIMES bestselling picture book ZEN TIES. Other beloved titles from Jon include THE THREE QUESTIONS, GERSHON'S MONSTER by Eric Kimmel, and THE CHRISTMAS MAGIC by Lauren Thompson. Muth lives in upstate New York with his wife and five children.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 7 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2005

    Beautiful Story!

    This is a beautiful story! It's very philosophical, but told in a way that children can understand. The illustrations are gorgeous as well. I look forward to using this book as a read-aloud in my sixth grade classroom!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2003

    Great Message - beautifully written and illustrated!

    This book offers a beautiful, much needed message of peace and understanding, at a time when our world needs it the most. I am a teacher and use it at every level. It leads to some very interesting classroom discussions. This book is worth it's price just in the beautiful watercolor illustrations alone.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 20, 2005

    The Purpose of Life

    ...that's what is inside this amazing book. If you have ever wondered 'What is life all about?' 'What is our purpose on earth?' you will find a compelling answer in this book. Need I say more? Both the illustrator (Jon J. Muth) and the author are inspired. The writing is poetic and the illustrations shed extra light on this illuminating fable.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2011

    My favorite book.

    This is, by far, my most favorite picture book ever written.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2008

    I Love This Book

    Wow. I am a turtle fanatic and Old Turtle is one of my favorite books. I was thrilled when I learned about the sequel. I was even more exited when I finally got a chance to read it. This book is amazing.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2009

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