Old Woman and Her Pig: An Appalachian Folktale

Overview

"Goin' to town,
gonna buy a little pig.
Jig jog jig jog jiggety-jig!"

But when the old woman tries to take that little pig home to her little boy, the pig won't cross the bridge—this little piggy is afraid of the water! The old woman pushes and pulls, cries and cajoles, with no luck. Until she sees a dog, a rat, and a cat—can the old woman...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (6) from $1.99   
  • New (1) from $77.49   
  • Used (5) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$77.49
Seller since 2015

Feedback rating:

(356)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Brand New Item.

Ships from: Chatham, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

"Goin' to town,
gonna buy a little pig.
Jig jog jig jog jiggety-jig!"

But when the old woman tries to take that little pig home to her little boy, the pig won't cross the bridge—this little piggy is afraid of the water! The old woman pushes and pulls, cries and cajoles, with no luck. Until she sees a dog, a rat, and a cat—can the old woman convince them to help her get the piggy back home?

Acclaimed storyteller Margaret Read MacDonald and illustrator John Kanzler bring new life to this classic tale.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Claudia Mills
An old woman finds a penny and heads off to town to buy herself a fat little pig: "Goin' to town, gonna buy a little pig. Jig jog jig jog jiggety-jig!" But on the way home, with night falling, the little pig refuses to cross the necessary bridge: "I can't get to my little boy tonight. It's almost dark, but the moon does shine." Luckily, cat worries rat, who nips dog, who barks at pig, and pig crosses the bridge in time for all the barnyard animals, and the old woman and her little boy, to have a musical reunion. In an author's note, MacDonald explains that the crying song—"but the moon does shine"—appeared in early print versions of the story, while the jogging song is her own invention. This does feel a bit like two different stories melded uneasily together: one expects to find one unifying refrain for a retold folktale, not two. Kanzler's illustrations depict the "little pig" as enormous, with the other assisting animals also grotesquely and almost menacingly oversized. But the closing spread where the pig fiddles while the others jig makes for a satisfying ending.
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2
This adaptation lacks the cleverness of the traditional British tale, the humor of Paul Galdone's 1960 version, and the fun of Eric Kimmel's 1992 offering. Old Woman goes "Jig jog jig jog jiggety-jig!" to town to buy a fat pig after Little Boy finds a penny. (Will anyone believe that she can buy a pig for a penny?) On the way back, the creature won't cross the bridge, so the old woman asks a dog to bark at the pig, a rat to nip the dog, and, finally, a cat to worry the rat. When the cat agrees to help, the other animals do their thing, and they all end up across the bridge and home with the little boy in time to dance a jig by nightfall. MacDonald has cut out some of the action of the original and watered down the story so that the tale seems rather pointless. There is a faint attempt to add some rhythm through the repetition of several lines, but the pace is uneven and sounds forced. Kanzler's animals are so friendly looking that one wonders why they refused to do the old woman's bidding in the first place.
—Martha SimpsonCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
When the old woman who lives in a little house on the hill finds a copper penny, she goes to town to buy a fat pig. "Goin' to town, gonna buy a little pig. Jig jog jig jog Jiggety-jig!" MacDonald's retelling of the classic story stirs in mountain flavor to the folksy fun of the cumulative tale. Kanzler's textured paintings play up the expressions and sauciness of the old woman, her little boy and the animals (cat, rat, dog, pig) as the page composition cunningly stages each refusal to cross the bridge and bold type emphasizes sounds and phrases. Few versions of the story have matched the mettle of Paul Galdone's since 1960; Rosanne Litzinger's (1993) borders on sweetness and Eric Kimmel's (1992), in which ten things buck the bridge, lacks charm. In contrast, this rendition is in fine fettle with its down-home cadence, rustic setting and spunky characterizations that resemble Marcia Sewell's style. (author's note, music for two songs) (Picture book/folktale. 3-6)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060280895
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 1/2/2007
  • Pages: 32
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.60 (w) x 11.20 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Margaret Read MacDonald is a storyteller, author, folklorist, and children's librarian, whom School Library Journal has called "a grand dame of storytelling." Ms. MacDonald is the author of numerous books, including pickin' peas, illustrated by Pat Cummings, and the award-winning book The Parents' Guide to Storytelling. She lives in Kirkland, Washington.

John Kanzler is the illustrator of several books for children, including Whose Feet? by Nina Hess, and The Big Rock Candy Mountain. He lives with his wife, Diane, on a farm in Greenfield, Massachusetts, along with several sheep, llamas, and cats—but no pigs.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)