The Old Woman and the Eagle

The Old Woman and the Eagle

by Idries Shah
     
 

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In this amusing story, an old woman encounters an eagle for the first time. Perplexed by its unfamiliar appearance, she decides to change it to suit her own ideas of what a bird should look like. Her efforts mirror a common pattern of human thought: altering the unfamiliar to make it acceptable. This tale is specially presented for children by Afghan author

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Overview

In this amusing story, an old woman encounters an eagle for the first time. Perplexed by its unfamiliar appearance, she decides to change it to suit her own ideas of what a bird should look like. Her efforts mirror a common pattern of human thought: altering the unfamiliar to make it acceptable. This tale is specially presented for children by Afghan author Idries Shah, who, for more than 30 years, collected stories from the Sufi tradition and adapted them to contemporary Western culture. Told since ancient times throughout Central Asia and the Middle East, such tales are used to help foster greater mental flexibility and insight in people of all ages.

En esta divertida historia, una señora ve un águila por primera vez. Perpleja por su apariencia, que le parece extraña, decide cambiarla para que se ajuste a sus propias ideas de cómo debería ser un pájaro. Sus esfuerzos representan un padrón común de la psicología humana: alterar lo desconocido para hacerlo aceptable. Este cuento es reelaborado especialmente para niños por el autor afgano Idries Shah, quien, por más de 30 años, recogió historias de la tradición Sufi y las adaptó a la cultura occidental contemporánea. Narrados desde tiempos remotos a través de Afganistán, Asia Central y el Medio Oriente, estos cuentos son usados por los Sufis para omentar una mayor flexibilidad mental y comprensión entre gente de todas las edades.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Out of Afghanistan comes this simple Sufi folk story collected by the late, noted Afghan author. In this gloriously illustrated tale, an old woman grooms an eagle to represent what she thinks is a pigeon-the only type of bird with which she is familiar. ... Delmar's paintings are beautiful and realistic. The side panels with detailed borders reflect elements of the tale and foreshadow events or reflect the elegant setting. ... the classic story, packaged in an elegant design, will be a good addition to every collection."
-Kirkus Reviews

"Natasha Delmar's eye-catching color illustrations add a special touch to this wonderful story about learning to be open to new sights and things."
-Midwest Book Review

"A fine story of how not to change others ... very highly recommended picturebook story."
-Children's Bookwatch The Picturebook Shelf

Publishers Weekly
Hoopoe Books spans the globe to offer four picture-book-and-CD packages featuring stories from the Sufi tradition adapted to Western culture by Afghani author Indries Shah. A roster of talented narrators serves up vibrant, often buttery-toned readings of these entertaining fables. Titles contain an educational introduction, narration with page-turn signals (and without signals), and all are available in Spanish and English, as well as hardcover and paperback. Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-This Middle-Eastern folktale told by Afghan writer Indries Shah tells the story of an old woman who can't accept that things can be different when she meets an eagle and insists that he must be a pigeon because she has never before seen an eagle. The woman then changes the eagle's claws, beak, and tuft so that he will resemble the pigeon. In the end, the bird flies away and returns to looking like an eagle. Beautiful illustrations by Natasha Delmar enhance this interesting tale. The CD consists of three parts: an introduction, the story with and without page-turn signals. The introduction, performed by Richard Fartherly, is a nice tool for parents and teachers as it provides brief background information on teaching stories, the Middle East, and the story of the eagle. There are also tips for parents on sharing this story with their children. Narrator Deb Bluford creates individual personas for each of the characters. The story is read at a nice pace that allows for time to follow along with the words as well as look at the detailed pictures. The addition of traditional music in the background adds authenticity to the tale.-Veronica Schwartz, Des Plaines Public Library, IL Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Out of Afghanistan comes this simple Sufi folk story collected by the late, noted Afghan author. In this gloriously illustrated tale, an old woman grooms an eagle to represent what she thinks is a pigeon--the only type of bird with which she is familiar. Its beak is bent, not straight like it should be, his claws are too long and its feathers are ruffled. The old woman straightens the eagle’s beak, clips his claws, combs his feathers smooth, and then releases him back outside. When the eagle meets another, the second eagle helps brush up the first eagle’s feathers and bends the eagle’s beak to its rounded form. His claws will grow in time. Meanwhile, the two of them will stay away from silly people who think pigeons are eagles and eagles pigeons. Delmar’s paintings are beautiful and realistic. The side panels with detailed borders reflect elements of the tale and foreshadow events or reflect the elegant setting. Given that there is so little available for children from this region, the classic story, packaged in an elegant design, will be a good addition to every collection. (Picture book/folktale. 5-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781942698180
Publisher:
Institute for Study of Human Knowledge
Publication date:
09/01/2006
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.11(d)
Age Range:
4 - 12 Years

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