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Older Cat: Recognizing Decline and Extending Life
     

Older Cat: Recognizing Decline and Extending Life

5.0 1
by Dan Poynter, Stephen G. Lewis (Foreword by)
 
The purpose of this book is to educate and console the cat owner. It covers the aging process and signs of decline, medical disorders, nutrition, medical care, and choices before and after death or euthanasia. Interspersed are brief stories and anecdotes.

Overview

The purpose of this book is to educate and console the cat owner. It covers the aging process and signs of decline, medical disorders, nutrition, medical care, and choices before and after death or euthanasia. Interspersed are brief stories and anecdotes.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
While several books address the care of aging dogs, this is the first to consider aging cats. Its stated purpose is to educate and console the cat owner. It is estimated that there are more than 75 million cats in households across the United States and that 40 percent are "seniors" (over age seven). Industry surveys demonstrate that pets, particularly dogs and cats, are considered family by many and that people will go to great lengths and spend huge sums ($28.5 billion annually) on the care and treatment of their pets. Geared toward that vast group of concerned pet owners, this book is organized into chapters that cover the aging process and signs of decline, medical disorders, nutrition, medical care, and choices before and after death or euthanasia. Interspersed are brief, accessibly written stories and anecdotes. While the author is not a veterinarian, he did consult with vets, one of whom provides a foreword. This book fills a niche in pet literature, and most public libraries will find useful. Edell Marie Schaefer, Brookfield P.L., WI Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781568600765
Publisher:
Para Publishing
Publication date:
01/28/2002
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
139
Sales rank:
921,343
Product dimensions:
5.60(w) x 8.60(h) x 0.45(d)

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Older Cat: Recognizing Decline and Extending Life 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Ohstacy More than 1 year ago
By page 14 of "The Older Cat: Recognizing Decline & Extending Life" by Dan Poynter, I was hooked, and I knew I would love the entire book when I read that cats do not see us as "little people." Instead, we are "big cats" in their eyes. In fact, when we provide food, they see us as "great hunters." What a wonderful image. I now relate and feel so much more appreciated (care giving can be such a thankless job!) by my three cats after reading this excellent perspective. As a regular e-newsletter subscriber to his self-publishing "manifesto," I have been a fan of Dan Poynter's for many years. In fact, when I teach writing/publishing, I never fail to introduce him to my students as the guru of the self-publishing universe. There is nothing more refreshing then to admire an author/entrepreneur who actually practices what he preaches. One of the biggest motivators in writing and, in this case, self-publishing, a book is to fulfill a need. When Dan sought advice to aid his aging cat, Cricket, whose health suddenly declined, Dan could not find adequate information to assist him. Alas, Dan took the initiative and wrote "The Older Cat." At first, I was reluctant to read about the topic of aging cats and their chances of declining health, but I was immediately relieved to read that the book's intent was meant to shed a positive light on the grim topic. Indeed, there is a positive side to this theme. Although my cats are, relatively speaking (by today's standards), young, I felt empowered with the knowledge that I obtained from Dan's book. I know it will provide me with a sort of armor when I must deal with the inevitable circumstances that arise with pets. The author's accomplishment is a five-paw, comprehensive handbook that delves into a panoply of statistics as well as medical, nutritional and practical advice. Interesting, too, is a pet owner's range of choices before and after death and a good insight (from the pet owner's as well as the pet's perspective) into euthanasia. Dan illustrates plenty of anecdotes, including Dan's own, in an easy-to-digest 144 pages! Cricket, Dan's cat, lived more than 20 years! Sans medical background, I don't think too many people can compete with the author's personal expertise on the subject of aging cats. Whether readers own a kitten, teen, adult or aging cat, this book is an indispensible, simply purr-fect addition to any pet owner's library.