Olga Neuwirth: Lost Highway

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Eddins
"Lost Highway" 2002-2003, by composer Olga Neuwirth and librettist Elfriede Jelinek, is based on David Lynch's 1992 cult classic and was one of the first operas derived from a film with an original screenplay excluding films derived from preexisting works. It's also been the most successful, with multiple acclaimed international productions and now a splendid recording from Kairos, which won a Diapason d'Or Award in 2007. While there are few moments where Neuwirth's score resembles Angelo Badalamenti's brilliantly evocative original, her basic approach to musical dramaturgy is not far from his. Both use sounds, often low-pitched and ominous, intended to trigger anxiety ...
See more details below
CD
$30.39
BN.com price
(Save 5%)$31.99 List Price
Other sellers (CD)
  • All (4) from $22.28   
  • New (4) from $22.28   

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Eddins
"Lost Highway" 2002-2003, by composer Olga Neuwirth and librettist Elfriede Jelinek, is based on David Lynch's 1992 cult classic and was one of the first operas derived from a film with an original screenplay excluding films derived from preexisting works. It's also been the most successful, with multiple acclaimed international productions and now a splendid recording from Kairos, which won a Diapason d'Or Award in 2007. While there are few moments where Neuwirth's score resembles Angelo Badalamenti's brilliantly evocative original, her basic approach to musical dramaturgy is not far from his. Both use sounds, often low-pitched and ominous, intended to trigger anxiety in the listener, in response to, or foreshadowing, a viscerally disturbing image or action. Huge expanses of the film are silent which creates its own sense of terror, and Badalamenti's underscoring is so subtle that its effect is virtually subliminal. In opera, the music is the primary focus, and Neuwirth manages to sustain an aural equivalent to Lynch's mysterious and terrifying visual imagery. If anything, the opera is darker than the film; Lynch sets some of his scenes in daylight and allows in moments of warped humor, but Neuwirth's score, while richly varied in textures and colors, could never be characterized as light. It's a testimony to her inventiveness and inspiration that her depiction of grimness is never monotonous; she finds an infinitely diverse number of ways to express psychological and physical hysteria. The recording features performers from the original 2003 production in Graz, including Klangforum Wien, conducted by Johannes Kalitzke. Neuwirth's exquisitely complex score includes the extensive use of both pre-recorded sound and live electronics, and Kalitzke and his ensemble with the assistance of a crew of very capable audio engineers pull off a performance that's searing in its intensity and impact. Against the backdrop of the nightmarish orchestral and electronic landscape, the singers and actors develop the freakishly twisted story through Sprechstimme, bel canto singing, speaking, and extended vocal techniques. Constance Hauman is totally gripping both in her spoken dramatic sections as Renée and in her virtuosic coloratura turn as Alice. In the speaking role of Fred, Vincent Crowly seems to be eerily channeling the timing and intensity of Bill Pullman's performance in the film. Neuwirth creates a powerhouse of a role for David Moss as Mr. Eddy/Dick Laurent, one of the most freakish in any opera, and Moss does it full justice. In the score's cast list, Neuwirth describes the part this way: for "Singer/Actor/Improvising musician native language English; ideally David Moss." It's a harrowing performance; there's nothing in any opera comparable to his death scene, a two-minute aria in which he chokes on his own blood. Andrew Watts' Mystery Man is also memorable; his falsetto Sprechstimme, full of slithering portamenti, is chillingly threatening. There are a few weak links; several of the performers aren't native English speakers and their mannered, heavily accented delivery is distracting. The sound of the SACD is superb and was created to be experienced in 5.1 surround sound. Fans of contemporary opera who aren't squeamish owe it to themselves to explore the new terrain that Neuwirth opens up in "Lost Highway."
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • Release Date: 11/1/2008
  • Label: Kairos
  • EAN: 9120010281044
  • Catalog Number: 1254
  • Sales rank: 135,659

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1–34 Lost Highway, opera - Olga Neuwirth & Johannes Kalitzke (92:57)
Read More Show Less

Album Credits

Performance Credits
Johannes Kalitzke Primary Artist
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously