Oliver Button Is a Sissy

Oliver Button Is a Sissy

4.0 5
by Tomie dePaola, Tomie de Paola
     
 

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A little boy must come to terms with being teased and ostracized because he’d rather read books, paint pictures, and tap-dance than participate in sports. “There is a good balance between the simple text . . . and the expressive pictures . . . an attractive little book.”--School Library Journal
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Overview


A little boy must come to terms with being teased and ostracized because he’d rather read books, paint pictures, and tap-dance than participate in sports. “There is a good balance between the simple text . . . and the expressive pictures . . . an attractive little book.”--School Library Journal

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780156681407
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
05/28/1979
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
48
Sales rank:
141,234
Product dimensions:
6.50(w) x 8.12(h) x 0.18(d)
Lexile:
480L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

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Oliver Button Is a Sissy 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am a student teacher that loves the author, but was disappointed with the book. I have boys in my class that love to read, draw and do many of the things that the main character does -- for which he is called a 'sissy'. It would not occur to my boys that these activities were 'Sissy-like' or unboyish. My cooperating teacher agreed that the story was problematic. We chose not to read it to the class because we didn't want to put the notion in any child's head that these activities were questionable for boys. The book comes out of the 1970s and is based on true 1970s/1980s gender issues and stereotypes --I was born in 1965 and I lived through this era. When the book was written, it was certainly cutting edge and made a statement. It is far less relevent today and not a great pick for 21st Century children.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Lizita More than 1 year ago
I must disagree with Anonymous. When you take into account the fact that Oliver dislikes sports and loves to don a top hat and dance around the house, this is more significant than just his penchant for art, books, etc. as you pointed out. This concept, to be learned at such a young age (this book can be used even for Kindergarten), is very impactful. And it is handled gracefully and sensitively by Tomie De Paola. I especially appreciate now that the term "Sissy" does sound so harsh. In these times in which we live, it is a useful lesson for children to see. That those who used such harsh words can have a change of heart in the end (like these mean boys, who ultimately say that "Oliver Button is a Star.") I absolutely LOVE this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was thoroughly delighted that there are books like this available for kids. This book contains a wonderful lesson and example for children to use in life. There should be more great stories like this one!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent book that confronts gender stereotypes and the importance of accepting people for who they are. Oliver Button does not engage in the traditional activities that boys do, and thus, he is faced with repercussions and consequences (based on how others feel Oliver should behave/act). I teach fourth grade and - though a picture book - it is the ideal book to discuss self-confidence and diversity and the significance of accepting individuals while recognizing their accomplishments and contributions.