Olu's Dream

Olu's Dream

5.0 1
by Shane W. Evans
     
 

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It's time for Olu to lie down in bed, for the little one to sleep, his dad just said. Though Olu would rather play and race, Not end the fun, or slow the pace.But as soon as Olu shuts those eyes, catch this—imagination flies!

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Overview

It's time for Olu to lie down in bed, for the little one to sleep, his dad just said. Though Olu would rather play and race, Not end the fun, or slow the pace.But as soon as Olu shuts those eyes, catch this—imagination flies!

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
PreS-K—Little Olu has set up some of his toys in readiness for "the big race," but his father ends the child's fun by announcing that it's time for bed. Evading monsters, eating all the pizza he can hold, riding on a big blue whale, and traveling in a rocket ship through outer space reveal that the child's imagination runs wild even in sleep. The story is told in forced rhyming couplets: "It's a whale! What a ride. Feel that cool breeze./Away we go, unless there's a sneeeeze…." The numerous, brightly colored, frenetic, manga-style illustrations may appeal to children but are not enough to make this even an additional purchase.—Maryann H. Owen, Racine Public Library, WI
Kirkus Reviews
Curly-haired Olu would rather play than sleep, but when Dad and Mom turn off the lights, the vivacious tyke embarks on a series of fantastical dreams. With teddy-bear sidekick in tow, Olu's imagination pours forth in stream-of-consciousness style as he encounters monsters, rides a whale and races through space. In one hilarious spread, the two buddies gorge on pizza and honey, eyes closed in a delicious delirium. Lying on the ground, their muffin-top bellies cause fissures in the floor with their heaving weight. Upon waking, Olu recounts his adventures to his father, who explains that the imagination "never stops" and that one can "dream during the day / and use that imagination whenever you play." The anime-influenced illustrations depict the spunky protagonist as a wide-eyed, cute-as-a-button child of mixed-race descent. Evans uses collage with multiple textured layers, the graphic shapes reinforced with thick pencil work. While the simple rhyming text of successive couplets is regrettably inelegant, this is a pleasant story that encourages readers to use their creative capacities. (Picture book. 3-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060726720
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
08/25/2009
Pages:
40
Sales rank:
1,251,339
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 11.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

Meet the Author

Shane W. Evans is the illustrator of more than thirty picture books for children, including The Way a Door Closes by Hope Anita Smith, a Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe Award winner, and the author and illustrator of Olu's Dream. He has exhibited his art in West Africa and Paris and in Chicago, New York, and other major U.S. cities. He lives in Kansas City, Missouri, where he runs Dream Studio, a community art space.

Shane W. Evans is the illustrator of more than thirty picture books for children, including The Way a Door Closes by Hope Anita Smith, a Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe Award winner, and the author and illustrator of Olu's Dream. He has exhibited his art in West Africa and Paris and in Chicago, New York, and other major U.S. cities. He lives in Kansas City, Missouri, where he runs Dream Studio, a community art space.

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