On Any Given Sunday [NOOK Book]

Overview

“Pat Toomay has mixed fact and fiction to produce a story that will make every armchair quarterback laugh and wince — and worry at his exposition of “the game’s” most insidious reality: the prospect — on any given Sunday — of a fix.”
—John Seigenthaler, Editorial Director, USA Today

“Toomay, for many years a lineman with the Cowboys and the Raiders, gives a sinister turn to the old saw that ‘on any given Sunday, one team can beat another’ … he...
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On Any Given Sunday

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Overview

“Pat Toomay has mixed fact and fiction to produce a story that will make every armchair quarterback laugh and wince — and worry at his exposition of “the game’s” most insidious reality: the prospect — on any given Sunday — of a fix.”
—John Seigenthaler, Editorial Director, USA Today

“Toomay, for many years a lineman with the Cowboys and the Raiders, gives a sinister turn to the old saw that ‘on any given Sunday, one team can beat another’ … he writes knowledgeably about football: its strategy, the pain, the respect and hatred between the men in the trenches.”
—Publishers Weekly
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940148793458
  • Publisher: Tornasol Press
  • Publication date: 7/19/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 287
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Pat Toomay played ten years in the NFL. He is the author of two books about pro football: The Crunch, an irreverent look at the Tom Landry era Dallas Cowboys, and the novel, On Any Given Sunday. He has written for the New York Times, the Chicago Tribune, the Nashville Tennessean, Rolling Stone, GQ, ESPN’s Page 2 and Salon.com, among other venues. His ESPN columns broke readership records. An article about his involvement in Oliver Stone’s football film was included in Houghton Mifflin’s Best American Sportswriting 2000 and has been added as postscript to the eBook edition of On Any Given Sunday. Toomay lives and writes in Albuquerque, NM.
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2001

    Insightful

    Here's a review from Sports Illustrated that I found insightful. By John Seabrook: When it comes to fiction by and about defensive ends, I'll admit I'm a rookie. Pat Toomay's novel On Any Given Sunday caught me off guard. The prose is vivid, the dialogue rings true and the plot, though porous in places, usually holds water. But more surprising is the psyche of Toomay's main character. The author was a member of Dallas' Doomsday Defense who spent 10 years messing up the other team's Sunday afternoons. You would expect Toomay's fictional persona, Washington lineman Brad Rafferty, to be equally fearsome, or at least aggressive. But no, Brad is a 250-pound paranoid, in and out of uniform. Is Toomay making this up or are defensive linemen really this, well, defensive? Brad¿s anxiety seems too pervasive to be wholly invented¿but the reader must figure it out for himself. The puzzle is well worth the price of the book. Brad is haunted by that biggest bogey in sports fiction, the fixed game. At least Brad suspects a fix¿he can¿t prove it. His suspicions light first on the officials, but spread to include his coach, teammates and girl friend. Come the play-offs against Chicago, Brad feels he alone can defend the integrity of the game. ¿The game¿ has two meanings in this book. First, it is football, and by the end of the book, Brad¿s vision of football is definitely warped. Take his description of the scrimmage line: ¿The creature snapped to life, burst apart, shattering into a tumult of armor-clad fragments that tore in a vicious assault against its own midsection¿¿ But the game is also a metaphor. We all play the game, Toomay suggests, be it sports, business, law. We all need rules, boundaries and a clock to live by. We try to control the game through our actions. But in fact, as Brad realizes, the game controls us. We¿re all hunkered down in a figurative goal-line stand. Well, maybe not all of us. But if you¿ve ever wondered how the world looks through a face mask, On Any Given Sunday is for you.

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