Why You Should Care about the Person Who Made Your Cell Phone (Ebook Shorts) [NOOK Book]

Overview

How Supply Chains Can Become Value Chains

The headlines are almost unfathomable: More than one thousand Bangladesh garment-industry workers killed when their building collapsed. Over one hundred workers killed in a poultry-factory fire in China. Harsh conditions and a rash of suicides at a Taiwanese company producing cell phones. These tragedies highlight the hazardous ...
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Why You Should Care about the Person Who Made Your Cell Phone (Ebook Shorts)

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Overview

How Supply Chains Can Become Value Chains

The headlines are almost unfathomable: More than one thousand Bangladesh garment-industry workers killed when their building collapsed. Over one hundred workers killed in a poultry-factory fire in China. Harsh conditions and a rash of suicides at a Taiwanese company producing cell phones. These tragedies highlight the hazardous working conditions for much of the world's population. Are inexpensive clothes and the latest iPhone worth it?

When we think of the individuals who make our lives work as our neighbors--crossing cultural, racial, religious, regional, and tribal boundaries--it might cause us to change how we do business. All of God's children are our neighbors, says Jim Wallis, a radical concept that is essential to the common good in our increasingly globalized culture. He suggests making "Ten Personal Decisions for the Common Good" to help improve things from your corner of the world.

This is a selection from On God's Side: What Religion Forgets and Politics Hasn't Learned about Serving the Common Good
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781441245977
  • Publisher: Baker Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 8/19/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 31,620
  • File size: 802 KB

Meet the Author

Jim Wallis is president and CEO of Sojourners and editor in chief of Sojourners magazine. He is a best-selling author, public theologian, nationally known preacher, social activist, and international commentator on ethics and public life. Wallis has written ten books and is a frequent speaker in the United States and abroad. He has written for major newspapers and appears on CNN, MSNBC, and Fox News. He is married to Joy Carroll, is the father of Luke and Jack, and is a Little League baseball coach.
Jim Wallis is president and founder of Sojourners and editor in chief of Sojourners magazine. He is a bestselling author, public theologian, national preacher, social activist, and international commentator on ethics and public life. Wallis has written ten books, including the New York Times bestsellers God's Politics: Why the Right Gets It Wrong and the Left Doesn't Get It and The Great Awakening, and is a frequent speaker in the United States and abroad. He has written for major newspapers and appears frequently on CNN, MSNBC, and Fox News, on shows such as Meet the Press, Morning Joe, Hardball, The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, and The O'Reilly Factor, and on NPR. He also teaches at Georgetown University and has taught at Harvard University.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 11 )
Rating Distribution

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(6)

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(3)

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Sort by: Showing all of 11 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 9, 2013

    ¿Don¿t go right; don¿t go left; go deeper.¿ Wonderful advice, bu

    “Don’t go right; don’t go left; go deeper.” Wonderful advice, but the author doesn’t follow it himself. Wallis went left years before most of us were even born, but he continues to wear (awkwardly) the tag “evangelical,” probably the worst case of false advertising in Christendom. He also tries to pass himself off as the Wise One who sees the errors of both liberals and conservatives and (like every charlatan) claims he has found the More Excellent Way, so we can sigh with relief at him guiding us into the non-ideological REAL Christianity, the kind Jesus himself would practice if he walked the earth today. Wallis has been promising gullible readers his More Excellent Way for 50 years, and he never provides it, never. It’s pure liberalism, and nothing in the Wallis platform differs in the slightest from the Democratic party platform (except that he does claim to be pro-life, but generally avoids that ticklish issue). One of the other reviews states that “Wallis is neither liberal nor conservative.” Oh, please. He’s shamelessly liberal and bashes conservatives every time his mouth opens.

    We discover that (as in all Wallis’s books) Jesus’ agenda looks suspiciously like Jim Wallis’s agenda (pure coincidence, of course), and that Jesus has a knack for using the latest liberal buzzwords like “inclusivity” and (the core idea of this book) “fairness.” Liberalism is not, of course, a system of thought, it is a collection of slogans, just words or phrases that easily fit on a bumper sticker and can be spoken and shouted ad nauseam, meaning that the liberal pundits could just as easily be a chorus of mynah birds trained to repeat the usual: “Inclusivity!” “Equality!” “Fairness!” Don’t think, don’t explain, just repeat, and the dimwits in the culture will get sucked in.

    Who could object to “fairness”? No one. But the BIG question liberals never dream of asking is, fairness as defined by whom? (Well, THEM, of course.) In this book, “fairness” means accepting open borders, admitting illegal immigrants and accepting them, everything but people-movers to aid them in their illegal entry. Is that “fair” to the US citizens in Arizona and New Mexico who have their property trashed and who often live in fear? Or to US taxpayers coast to coast, who all pay for the massive cost of millions of people who should not be here, aided by a president who has made it clear that, for him, there is no border, and by a Congress in which both parties shy from the immigration issue because they are such craven cowards that they are cowed by fears of the media calling them “racist.” Jesus’s view of fairness (or, Wallis’s view, rather) is that US citizens don’t matter, “fair” only applies to people whose presence in the US begins with breaking the law. Ignoring the needs of US citizens and focusing all our compassion on illegals fits Wallis’s definition of the “common good,” one of his bumper-sticker clichés that shows up on every page. Keep saying the cliché, make the reader shut down his brain and just accept the pleasant-sounding phrase. Who would oppose “the common good”? I would – that is, I would define that far differently that Wallis would. As a Christian, I see myself under no divine mandate to encourage illegal immigration or any other crime. Wallis can tear down the walls of his home if he wishes to and put up a sign that signs “Homeless people welcome here.” He has no right to tell an entire country, or all the Christians in it, that they must do the same – and, incidentally, Wallis isn’t going to open up his home because he understands that being “welcoming” and “inclusive” doesn’t mean removing all boundaries. But remember, liberalism isn’t about being generous, it’s about forcing other people to be generous.

    Let me save you the trouble of wading through this mucky swamp of liberal clichés: Being “on God’s side” and being guided by Jesus means: be a liberal, support open borders, accept that the immigration situation will remain as it is, or worsen, but God wants you to accept it and abet it. If you want to contribute to the “common good,” check the names on the ballot that have a “D” (as in “Democrat”) next to them. And when you talk, use the right words – “compassion,” “common good,” “inclusive,” “equality,” the usual list. This is the Gospel, according to St. James.

    10 out of 46 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2013

    Worth Reading

    A helpful comprehensive review of life in America and how to bring health and wholeness to individual, community and national life. After reading I am ready to seek and pursue the common good.

    8 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 22, 2013

    Highly Recommended,a must read!

    Very informative,reading a second time. A combination of C.S.Lewis and social justice.Take a moment to catch up.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2013

    Another great book by Jim Wallis. Building community is what it

    Another great book by Jim Wallis. Building community is what it takes to pass God's "Final Exam" that is, Matthew 25.

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2014

    Chat room

    Symbol chat and laugh away

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  • Posted January 14, 2014

    Very interesting and concise commentary our current cultural, re

    Very interesting and concise commentary our current cultural, religious and political values and suggestions for realigning our communities, nation and even the world beginning in the nurturing environment of our own homes. Even though I may not always agree 100% with him, I always find myself right at home in Wallis's books as his writing style is so genuinely conversational and honest. As a minister, I look forward to and appreciate his theological perspective on any subject he tackels.
    I highly recommend this book for anyone looking for specific suggestions on how to transform the world around you one that flourishes for your good and the common good of all. This book is currently being taught in a class in my church using the ten suggestions Wallis lays out in the back.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 1, 2013

    For all we know, Jesus was a raging lefty.

    For all we know, Jesus was a raging lefty.

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 29, 2013

    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 23, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2013

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2013

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