On Intersubjectivity and Cultural Creativity / Edition 2

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Overview

One of the foremost religious and social philosophers of the twentieth century, Martin Buber also wrote extensively on sociological subjects, particularly as these affected his philosophical concerns. Collected here, these writings offer essential insights into the human condition as it is expressed in culture and society.

Buber's central focus in his sociological work is the relation between social interaction, or intersubjectivity, and the process of human creativity. Specifically, Buber seeks to define the nature and conditions of creativity, the conditions of authentic intersubjective social relations that nurture creativity in society and culture. He attempts to identify situations favorable to creativity that he believes exist to some extent in all cultures, though their fullest development occurs only rarely.

Buber considers the combination of open dialogue between human and human and a dialogue between man and God to be necessary for the crystallization of the common discourse that is essential for holding a free, just, and open society together.

Important for an understanding of Buber's thought, these writings—touching on education, religion, the state, and charismatic leadership—will be of profound value to students of sociology, philosophy, and religion.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780226078076
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication date: 12/28/2008
  • Series: Heritage of Sociology Series Series
  • Edition description: 1
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 272
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction 1
Selected Bibliography of Buber's Works 23
I The Anthropological Philosophy of Man
1 The Nature of Man 29
What Is Man? Kant's Questions 29
Prospect 36
Dialogue 41
2 The Social Dimensions of Man 57
Distance and Relation 57
Elements of the Interhuman 67
On the Psychologizing of the World 80
II The Social Framework of Cultural Creativity
3 Community as the Basic Social Framework of Human Creativity 93
A Translation of Buber's Preface to "Die Gesellschaft" 93
Comments on the Idea of Community 96
The Forerunners 100
4 Biblical Leadership and Community 108
Biblical Leadership 108
The Land 119
5 Hasidic Community and Leadership 129
Introduction to Tales of the Hasidim 129
6 National Community: The Zionist Movement 156
The Land and Its Possessors 156
III Processes of Social and Cultural Renovation
7 Religious Renovation 167
The Teaching of the Tao 167
8 Pioneering - "Halutziuth" 190
An Experiment That Did Not Fail 190
IV The Dynamics of Social Retrogression
9 The Interrelations between the Social and the Political Dimensions of Human Existence 205
Society and the State 205
The Demand of the Spirit and Historical Reality 217
The Validity and Limitation of the Political Principle 229
Lenin and the Renewal of Society 238
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