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On Meadowview Street
     

On Meadowview Street

5.0 1
by Henry Cole
 

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Caroline lives on Meadowview Street. But where's the meadow? Where's the view? There's nothing growing in her front yard except grass. Then she spots a flower and a butterfly and a bird and Caroline realizes that with her help, maybe Meadowview Street can have a meadow after all.

Overview

Caroline lives on Meadowview Street. But where's the meadow? Where's the view? There's nothing growing in her front yard except grass. Then she spots a flower and a butterfly and a bird and Caroline realizes that with her help, maybe Meadowview Street can have a meadow after all.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

The front lawn of Caroline's new home is like all the others in her cookie-cutter subdivision-it's a simple, sterile patch of green that falls far short of the "Meadowview" that her street name promises. But after she saves the yard's single wildflower from her father's lawnmower, Caroline is inspired to turn her lawn into a tiny nature preserve. Mom agrees to buy a maple tree, Dad is only too willing to sell the lawnmower and help his daughter build birdhouses and a pond and an idyllic habitat begins to take shape-one that inspires their neighbors. "And soon, the Jacksons' yard changed. And the Smiths'. And the Sotos'," writes Cole (On the Way to the Beach). "Now there really was a meadow on Meadowview Street." As a writer, Cole is almost reportorial in tone; he wisely chooses not to limn the depth of his heroine's emotional landscape, which could have turned his book into a sappy "kids-can-do-anything" story. But the growing lushness of the yard-beautifully portrayed in meticulously detailed, velvety acrylics-clues readers into Caroline's burgeoning sense of belonging and accomplishment. It's a lovely parable of suburban life. Ages 4-8. (May)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Children's Literature
When Caroline and her family move to Meadowview Street, she searches in vain for any meadow. Caroline is an environmentalist at heart. First, she protects a small flower in the lawn from her father’s mower. Soon, her “wildflower preserve” covers the entire lawn. Agreeing that her garden needs shade, her parents add a maple tree. Caroline and her father then build birdhouses for the birds in the tree. By the time they have added a pond, the neighbors have begun to change their yards as well, making friendly homes for nature’s flowers and creatures. This modern, simply-told tale is visualized in acrylic paintings that are positive in their simplified naturalism. There is neither weed nor hole-digging dog in this suburban development of identical houses and fences. Vignettes depict Caroline and her family’s activities clearly enough to be used as instructions for creating “meadows.” A double-page spread just before the end depicts and names the many inhabitants to be found in Caroline’s meadow. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

K-Gr 2
Caroline and her family have recently moved to Meadowview Street, in a development where all of the properties look alike and there's not a meadow in sight. The girl is about to go in search of one when she notices a small flower. "It's beautiful! Caroline said to herself. And all alone." She asks her dad to work around it while mowing the lawn, hurries inside to find string and sticks, and builds a "small wildflower preserve." As other flowers bloom, she enlarges the area. Dad puts the lawn mower up for sale, and, with the help of her parents, Caroline (surely an heir to Barbara Cooney's Miss Rumphius) sets about transforming her suburban backyard into a teeming ecosystem. Soon there are butterflies, birds, a pond, flowers, trees, and a real meadow on Meadowview Street. "And soon, the Jacksons' yard changed. And the Smiths'. And the Sotos'." Cole's economical text and tender, acrylic paintings tell the story with simplicity and energy as the barren strip of grass evolves into a lush habitat. This lovely picture book offers children a quiet approach to embracing the natural world.
—Kathleen WhalinCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
While her father mows the lawn at her new house, Caroline wonders how it could actually reflect the street's name. Soon she finds a small blossom growing in the grass, then another, and eventually persuades Dad to sell the mower while the yard grows freely with wildflowers. Adding a maple tree and a man-made pond attracts an assortment of wildlife from birds, to insects, to a mud turtle and a meadow mouse. Neighbors are encouraged to follow suit, creating meadow environments rather than pristine lawns. Full-color acrylic paintings in double-paged spreads of multiple shades of green, dotted with hues of summer flowers, tell this nature-lover's story which suggests the possibility of chemical-free garden environments. Though the message will be missed by young children, most will enjoy a final rendering of all the meadow creatures next to their proper names that now live on Meadowview Street. Gentle persuasion for the naturalist in everyone. (Picture book. 4-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060564810
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/24/2007
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
446,234
Product dimensions:
9.00(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.25(d)
Lexile:
500L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Henry Cole is the illustrator of many beloved books for children, including his own Jack’s Garden, On Meadowview Street, and A Nest for Celeste. Brambleheart was inspired by the heap of discarded treasures in the woods behind his childhood farm. You can visit Henry online at www.henrycole.net.

Henry Cole is the illustrator of many beloved books for children, including his own Jack’s Garden, On Meadowview Street, and A Nest for Celeste. Brambleheart was inspired by the heap of discarded treasures in the woods behind his childhood farm. You can visit Henry online at www.henrycole.net.

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On Meadowview Street 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
BusyMom22 More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful, simple story. My children (10, 7 & 4--both genders) all loved it, and we obviously took away the simple lesson the author intended, don't be a conformist, and let yourself dream and be who you want to be. Beautiful pictures and sweet story.