On My Own: Korean Businesses and Race Relations in America

Overview


The Los Angeles riots shattered Korean immigrants’ naive belief in the American dream. As many as 2,300 Korean shopkeepers lost their lifetime investments in one day. Korean immigrants had struggled for years to become economically independent through small businesses of their own. However, the riots made them realize how fragile their economic base is because their businesses are dependent on the impoverished, oppressed, and rebellious classes.

In On My Own, In-Jin Yoon ...

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On My Own: Korean Businesses and Race Relations in America

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Overview


The Los Angeles riots shattered Korean immigrants’ naive belief in the American dream. As many as 2,300 Korean shopkeepers lost their lifetime investments in one day. Korean immigrants had struggled for years to become economically independent through small businesses of their own. However, the riots made them realize how fragile their economic base is because their businesses are dependent on the impoverished, oppressed, and rebellious classes.

In On My Own, In-Jin Yoon combines an intimate fieldwork account of Korean-black relations in Chicago and Los Angeles with extensive quantitative analysis at the national level. Yoon argues that a complete understanding of the contemporary Korean-American community requires systematic analyses of patterns of Korean immigration, entrepreneurship, and race relations with other minority groups. He explains how small business has become the major economic activity of Korean immigrants and how Korean businesses in minority neighborhoods have intensified racial tensions between Koreans and minorities like blacks and Latinos.

“A groundbreaking study of Korean-black relations. Yoon’s insights on immigration, entrepreneurship, and race relations significantly enhance our understanding of urban racial tensions.”—William Julius Wilson, Harvard University

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
After 1965, as restrictions on immigration by national groups were eliminated and a premium on talent was substituted, the United States experienced an influx of highly educated Koreans. Their heritage included respect for entrepreneurial activity and recent acquaintance with the global economy. Often lacking transferable credentials from Korean professions, many became small business owners. By 1990, Korean Americans ranked among the country's highest groups in self-employment, with a large proportion of their businesses in poor African American and Hispanic neighborhoods. Building on Kim Hyung-Chan's New Urban Immigrants (Princeton Univ., 1981) and William J. Wilson's The Truly Disadvantaged (Univ. of Chicago, 1987), Yoon (The Social Origins of Korean Immigration to the United States from 1965-Present, East-West Ctr., 1993) continues the sociological discussion of Asian immigrant urban dwellers begun by Paul Siu in his 1950s studies (published as The Chinese Landroman, New York Univ., 1987). For academic and large public libraries.Margaret W. Norton, Morton West H.S., Berwyn Ill.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780226959283
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press
  • Publication date: 8/28/1997
  • Edition description: 1
  • Pages: 276
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Table of Contents


Preface
Introduction
1: The State of Immigrant and Ethnic Entrepreneurship in America
2: The Social Origins of Korean Immigration to the United States, 1903 to the Present
3: Class, Family, and Ethnicity in Korean Immigrant Entrepreneurship
4: Who Is My Neighbor?: Korean-Black Relations in Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York City
5: Conclusion
Notes
Bibliography
Index
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