On One Flower: Butterflies, Ticks and a Few More Icks

On One Flower: Butterflies, Ticks and a Few More Icks

by Anthony D. Fredericks
     
 

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A goldenrod flower is a "minibeast park," have you noticed? Take a closer look . . . a butterfly sipping nectar . . . a ladybug snacking on aphids - oh ladybug, look out for the ambushbug! This 5th book in Dr. Fredericks' series on animal communities will again send kids outdoors to explore.

Overview

A goldenrod flower is a "minibeast park," have you noticed? Take a closer look . . . a butterfly sipping nectar . . . a ladybug snacking on aphids - oh ladybug, look out for the ambushbug! This 5th book in Dr. Fredericks' series on animal communities will again send kids outdoors to explore.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Triss Robinson
While walking through the fields, two young boys discover the wondrous joys of watching tiny beings in our world. A colorful assortment of insects is seen living, eating, and laying their eggs on a strikingly beautiful flower called a goldenrod. The story is told in fast moving, clever rhyming verse that immediately catches the interest of the reader. Each page, which is beautifully illustrated, introduces a new insect and its characteristics. To help the reader remember these fine creatures on a deeper level, the author repeats what has been said from the previous page until at the end of the story all the insects are gathered together in verse. At the end of the book, there is a wonderful section called the field notes. This explains in detail about each insect featured in the book and where they are found. The best part of this section is entitled "Fantastic Facts," where children can read an unusual and interesting detail about each insect. This delightful book would be a great way to introduce a unit on invertebrates (insects) to young learners.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-A rhyming text, most of which is a cumulative poem, tells how two boys wander into a field and discover a thriving ecosystem on a single goldenrod flower. Couplets set on the backgrounds of vivid picture spreads identify each of the seven invertebrates that the children observe (a mix of insects and arachnids) and briefly describe one or two of their special physical and/or behavioral characteristics. An appendix offers some additional facts about the goldenrod and the featured invertebrates. Contact information for several conservation organizations is included. The realistic, full-color art is the book's best feature. The blue-eyed protagonists are attractive, the renderings of the small animals are close up and clear, and DiRubbio's use of a constantly changing perspective is refreshing. As for the poetry, while the lines may rhyme, they often make little sense. For instance, the couplet describing a tick reads, "An eight-legged tick with a sensitive feel,/Waits on the stalk for a blood-sucking meal." What's a "sensitive feel?" And is it the meal that sucks blood, or the tick? Some word combinations are just awkward, such as the reference to invertebrates as "bug-buggy critters," or a stinkbug as a "smell-smelly critter." Readers attracted to the art are likely to be disappointed by the poetry.-Karey Wehner, formerly at San Francisco Public Library Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781584690870
Publisher:
Dawn Publications
Publication date:
09/01/2006
Series:
Sharing Nature with Children Book Series
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,290,721
Product dimensions:
8.90(w) x 10.90(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
4 - 10 Years

What People are saying about this

Gary Dunn
"...a perfect blend of scientific information and rhyming text - bug science that�s fun to read!"
Director of Education, Young Entomologists� Society, Minibeast Zooseum and Education Center - February 2006

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