On the Boundaries of American Evangelicalism: The Postwar Evangelical Coalition

On the Boundaries of American Evangelicalism: The Postwar Evangelical Coalition

by Jon R. Stone
     
 

American Evangelicalism is a vast and nearly indefinable coalition movement of sometimes competing, sometimes cooperating denominations and independent churches whose ideological boundaries have been shifting since its postwar reemergence. On the Boundaries of American Evangelicalism seeks to account for the emergence of this coalition of moderate ProtestantsSee more details below

Overview

American Evangelicalism is a vast and nearly indefinable coalition movement of sometimes competing, sometimes cooperating denominations and independent churches whose ideological boundaries have been shifting since its postwar reemergence. On the Boundaries of American Evangelicalism seeks to account for the emergence of this coalition of moderate Protestants in the 1940s and 1950s, as distinct from fundamentalism on the right and liberalism on the left, and speculate on the reasons for the fracturing and decline of that coalition in the 1960s to the 1990s. Beyond recounting the history of postwar evangelicalism, this volume's contribution is to our understanding of how movements define their coalitional boundaries and how coalitions change and reconstitute their boundaries over time.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal - Library Journal
Stone (Univ. of California, Berkeley; A Guide to the End of the World: Popular Eschatology in America, LJ 6/1/93) asserts that "evangelicalism is a fiction," observing that evangelicals have expended considerable energy to establish an identity. He notes that most studies take one of three approaches to the subject. The descriptive approach offers metaphorical images (e.g., Timothy Smith's "kaleidoscope" or "mosaic") rather than accounting for evangelicalism's diversity and complexity. Others attempt to define evangelicalism theologically or to employ a liberal-conservative dichotomy. Noting the inadequacy of such models, Stone proposes instead a social structural modela sociological examination of "the role [that] group boundary dynamics came to play in defining the new evangelical coalition" that emerged in the Forties and Fifties. He draws on evangelical periodicals and the published works of evangelical leaders to show the degree to which evangelicals were concerned with defining the limits. Stone concludes that these boundaries were fluid, expanding or contracting as evangelicals attempted to establish new ground between traditional faith and modernism. This work adds a new twist to the considerable recent scholarship on American religion. Students should also find the lengthy bibliography useful. Recommended for academic libraries.Linda V. Carlisle, Southern Illinois Univ., Edwardsville
Booknews
Seeking an understanding of ideological movements and the construction of boundaries and shifts that occur within them over time, Stone (undergraduate and interdisciplinary studies, University of California -Berkeley) traces the emergence of the American Evangelical movement, a coalition of denominations and independent churches whose ideological boundaries have been shifting since its postwar origins. He examines this coalition of moderate Protestants in the 1940s and 1950s, and speculates on the reasons for its fracture and decline in the period from the 1960s to the 1990s. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312173425
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan
Publication date:
10/28/1997
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
5.71(w) x 8.55(h) x 0.81(d)

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