On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness: Adventure, Peril, Lost Jewels, and the Fearsome Toothy Cows of Skree

( 44 )

Overview

Andrew Peterson spins a riveting tale-for-all-ages, following Janner, Tink, and Leeli

Igiby and their trusty dog, Nugget, in escape from the vicious Fangs of Dang who seek the

lost jewels of Anniera. Quirky characters and their world of wonders—from the edge of the

Dark ...

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On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness: Adventure. Peril. Lost Jewels. And the Fearsome Toothy Cows of Skree.

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Overview

Andrew Peterson spins a riveting tale-for-all-ages, following Janner, Tink, and Leeli

Igiby and their trusty dog, Nugget, in escape from the vicious Fangs of Dang who seek the

lost jewels of Anniera. Quirky characters and their world of wonders—from the edge of the

Dark Sea of Darkness to the deadly Glipwood Forest and beyond—set the stage for this epic

adventure that includes…

 

Original Songs and Silly Poems • An Ex-Pirate Grandfather • Toothy

Cows & Real Sea Dragons • Tours of Anklejelly Manor & Peet the Sock

Man’s Tree House • Suspenseful Legend & Fascinating Lore • Genuine

Recipes for Maggotloaf • Authentic Hand-Drawn Maps

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Master storyteller Andrew Peterson has composed a fantasy that seems tailor-made to be read aloud to the entire family. Its premise, like those of other great stories, is simple: The three Igiby children (Janner, Tink, and their crippled sister, Leeli) stumble upon a long-vanished trove of jewels. The fiendishly evil Gnag the Nameless seeks, of course, to seize the treasure, which forces the three siblings, accompanied by their faithful pooch Nugget, to escape. Beyond that resonant setup, the youngsters encounter idiosyncratic characters worthy of Dickens or Tolkien and face wave after wave of seemingly insurmountable dangers. An inspiring, family-friendly fable.
Publishers Weekly

Playwright Peterson (Behold the Lamb of God) spins a whimsical fantasy novel that will appeal to both adult and YA readers. When the three Igiby siblings find a mysterious map, they embark on an adventure to discover family secrets about the father they never knew and a hidden treasure that many have long desired to find. Leeli, the youngest, can sing with a beauty that captivates dragons; Tink, the middle sibling, has the makings of a king; and Janner, the eldest, possesses a bravery that will protect them all. But the children's curiosity get the entire Igiby family into trouble with the Fangs of Dang-frightening, scaly-skinned, lizard creatures that drip venom-who have ruled the land of Scree since the Great War. Soon, the Igibys are scrambling for their lives. Peterson's style is lighthearted and funny, but following the Igibys' story requires patience and attention to detail and character so as not to get lost. The sheer amount of names, places, creatures and history Peterson invents will frustrate some readers-it is so complicated that he inserts explanatory "historical" footnotes throughout (though many are amusing). (Mar.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Kirkus Reviews
In the goofy fantasy land of Skree, where "totato" gardens are infested with "thwaps" and the town fool dances in circles with socks on his hands, three children find themselves embroiled in the fight against evil. Janner loves younger brother Tink and sister Leeli, but he wishes it wasn't always his job to protect them. Still, in a world run by the stinky, lizard-like Fangs of Dang, Janner can't be too careful. The ruler of the Fangs, wicked Gnag the Nameless, wants nothing more than the mythical Jewels of Anniera-and the local Fangs think Janner's family is hiding them. Over the course of a few too many nick-of-time rescues, the children learn their predictable great secret. Janner's loving family injects the fantasy tropes with heartfelt sincerity, which lies incongruously among the gags, silly names and fake footnotes. But all the right quest elements are here, and with a bit more balance (less forced clownishness, a more natural flow of narrative tension), the sequel could be a book well worth the wait. (Fantasy. 10-12)
From the Publisher
“So good–smart, funny, as full of ideas as action.”
Jonathan Rogers, author of The Wilderking Trilogy

“A wildly imaginative, wonderfully irreverent epic that shines with wit and wisdom–and features excellent instructions on how to cope with Thwaps, Fangs, and the occasional Toothy Cow.”
Allan Heinberg, writer/co-executive producer of ABC’s Grey's Anatomy, and co-creator of Marvel Comics Young Avengers

“Fun to read! Every page has word-play, a pun, or clever dialogue that makes me giggle, and the story is full of insight into life. The characters have great names and come to life and stimulate the imagination. Andrew is such a gifted storyteller; this book will be a treasure to both children and adults.”
James Bryan Smith, author of Room of Marvels; Rich Mullins: An Arrow Pointing to Heaven, and Embracing the Love of God; co-author of Devotional Classics with Richard J. Foster

“What a great story! I laughed, gasped, and learned more about Skreean culture than I ever thought possible. On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness is equal parts adventure and whimsy–a real page turner that both accelerates the heart and warms it. I loved it.”
Carolyn Arends, singer/songwriter and author of Wrestling with Angels

“Sometimes, in order to find out who we were supposed to be, we need to get lost in other worlds: Oz, Camelot, Narnia. In On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness, Andrew Peterson provides new and needed places like Aerwiar, Skree, and Glipwood–places where we need to get lost and found.”
Michael Card, author of The Hidden Face of God and The Parable of Joy, and singer/songwriter of more than thirty albums

“Totally fun! Andrew Peterson, a natural storyteller in the oral tradition, has nailed the voice needed to translate a rip-roaring fantasy tale to the written page.”
Donita K. Paul, author of DragonSpell, DragonKnight, DragonQuest, and DragonFire

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781598593525
  • Publisher: Oasis Audio
  • Publication date: 3/25/2008
  • Series: Wingfeather Saga Series , #1
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Unabridged Edition
  • Sales rank: 873,298
  • Product dimensions: 6.50 (w) x 5.40 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Meet the Author

A storyteller on stage, in the studio, and on paper, Andrew Peterson is a singer/songwriter of eight critically-acclaimed albums, including The Far Country.  He lives with his family, safe from toothy cows, in a little house called The Warren near Nashville.

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Read an Excerpt

AN INTRODUCTION TO THE IGIBY COTTAGE

Just outside the town of Glipwood, perched near the edge of the cliffs above the Dark Sea sat a little cottage where lived the Igiby family. The cottage was rather plain, except for how comfortable it was, and how nicely it had been built, and how neatly it was kept in spite of the three children who lived there, and except for the love that glowed from it like firelight from its windows at night.

As for the Igiby family? Well, except for the way they always sat late into the night beside the hearth telling stories, and when they sang in the garden while they gathered the harvest, and when the grandfather, Podo Helmer, sat on the porch blowing smoke rings, and except for all the good, warm things that filled their days there like cider in a mug on a winter night, they were quite miserable. Quite miserable indeed, in that land where walked the Fangs of Dang.

CHAPTER 8: TWO THROWN STONES

Faster, Janner!” Tink yelled over his shoulder as he ran towards town. Janner was huffing behind him, unable to keep up. As they drew closer Janner heard a deeper sound, below Leeli’s screams and Nugget’s growls: the dreadful, unmistakable snarl of a Fang. Janner looked from one side of the street to the other, desperate for some clue as to where the screams were coming from, but they seemed to come from everywhere. Tink bolted down the main street, which was mostly deserted. The few adults who remained were hustling toward the cliffs. If they heard the screams and the growling at all, they showed no sign of it. Out of the corner of Tink’s eye, down a narrow alleyway between Ferinia’s Flowers and J.

Bird’s Barber Shop, he saw a Fang struggling with something. Tink skidded to a stop and Janner plowed into him, nearly knocking him down.

There in the alley, in a cloud of dust, Nugget the dog was darting back and forth between the Fang’s legs, evading the Fang’s furious efforts to stab him with a spear. Leeli screamed again, and without a second thought her brothers ran down the alley to save her, though they both knew that there was nothing two young boys could do, pitted against a Fang of Dang.

The narrow alley led around a corner to a small area between the back of Ferinia’s and her stables. Leeli was curled into a ball while a second Fang held her in place with the butt of his spear. It watched with grim delight as the other struggled with the little black dog.

Nugget was in a frenzy, pouncing in and out, snarling and snapping at the Fang. The Fang standing over Leeli was chuckling in a thin, papery voice, “What’s the matter, Slarb? Is the smelly little thing too much for you?”

Slarb growled as he jabbed again at Nugget. The spear nicked Nugget in the leg and he yelped. Leeli screamed and the Fang jabbed at her with the butt of his spear just as her brothers burst around the corner, Tink in the lead. Leeli saw them and began kicking at the Fang with renewed vigor.

“Help me!” she screamed.

Janner found himself on Slarb’s back, beating him with all his might around the neck and shoulders. It was the first time he had ever touched a Fang, and he was dimly surprised how cold the scaly skin was. Tink dove past the second Fang, grabbed Leeli’s arms, and tried to pull her away from it. Slarb, with Janner on his back, hissed and thrashed, his long, sharp fangs dripping with venom. Nugget bit the lizard’s leg and wouldn’t let go. The other snake man seized Tink by his shirt collar and yanked him backwards and to the ground, where he laid choking and clutching his throat. Leeli reached for her crutch, but the Fang snatched it away from her and crushed it into splinters. It strode over to Slarb and kicked Nugget hard in the belly, sending him flying through the air with a yelp. The little dog crashed into the wooden wall and landed in a motionless heap. Slarb hurled Janner over his shoulder and onto the ground. He bent over to Janner’s neck with his scaly jaw wide open, baring his dripping fangs to bite. The second Fang drew his sword and raised it to strike Tink. Leeli was helpless but to close her eyes and pray.

At that moment there was a dull thunk. Slarb’s black eyes rolled back and he fell unconscious on top of Janner. The second Fang had time to see that Slarb had been hit in the head with a fist-sized rock before he felt a stone smash into his own temple. He tottered for a moment then crumpled to the dirt.

Tink lay there stunned. “Where did those rocks come from?” he said breathlessly. Leeli’s hands were folded tight and her eyes were still shut. She opened one of her eyes, amazed that the three of them were still alive. They heard Janner’s muffled voice from beneath the Fang and Tink snapped out of his daze. After a few heaves he pushed Slarb off and Janner scrambled away with a moan, wiping at his neck where the venom had dripped on it.

Janner rushed over to Leeli and helped her up, inspecting her carefully. “Are you hurt?” he asked. She was trembling but she shook her head, pushing her hair from her face. She hugged her brothers and smiled through stubborn tears.

“Nugget!” she cried. She hobbled over to the little black heap. One of the Fangs groaned and stirred.

“We should get out of here,” Janner said. “We don’t want to be here when these things wake up.” Leeli was crying, stroking Nugget’s face. “Leeli, we have to go,” Janner urged, pulling her away from the dog.

Suddenly, Nugget yelped and leapt to his feet. Hackles raised, he bared his teeth and circled menacingly. But his fierceness melted when he saw Leeli, and he set to licking her face and wagging his tail as if nothing had happened.

Leeli struggled to her feet and pointed at her ruined crutch. “I won’t be going anywhere with that.”

“Here,” Janner said, sidling up beside her and pulling one of her arms around his neck. “It looks like you’re going to have to let us help you for once. Let’s go,” he said, and they hurried out of the alleyway, leaving it completely empty.

Except, of course, for the two Fangs lying in the dirt, the two stones that knocked them unconscious, and the mysterious figure on the roof of J. Bird’s Barber Shop watching the three Igiby children flee.

CHAPTER 9: THE CLIFF TRAIL

When they were back in the open street, two of the three children (and the little black dog) felt a little better. Leeli was mostly happy that Nugget was fine, Tink was mostly glad that Leeli was fine, and Janner was mostly terrified because he was the oldest and had begun to think of the future. Glipwood was a small town, and it would be a matter of time–hours, maybe even minutes–before the Fang called Slarb and his companion reported back to Commander Gnorm.

Then terrible things would follow.

“We have to go home.”

“Aw, Janner!” said Tink. “Can’t we see the dragons? Everyone’s there, and as soon as the moon rises–” “By the time the moon rises, you know what’s going to happen?”

Janner snapped. Leeli and Tink were silent as they made their way slowly through Glipwood’s empty main street. Janner tried to calm himself down. “What’s going to happen, other than the sea dragons dancing, is that those two Fangs will wake up. And once they do, every Fang in Glipwood will be looking for three kids and a little black dog. Oh, and the girl has a lame leg. Now tell me, do you think they’ll have a hard time finding us?” Janner finished, more irritated than when he began.

“What do we do?” Leeli said after a long pause.

“Mama will be at the cliffs watching the dragons, but that will probably be the first place the Fangs would look for us. Podo always stays home on Dragon Day. So that’s where we’re going. Podo will know what to do.” Janner set his face for the lane that led to the cottage.

“I hope he does.”

“Here,” Tink offered, wrapping Leeli’s other arm around his neck and picking up his pace. Nugget trotted along beside them very seriously, as if he too had realized it was a bad situation indeed. The light deepened as they walked, so when they were still an arrow’s shot away from the cottage they already knew that their grandfather wasn’t home.

No lantern burned in the window, no smoke lifted lazily out of the chimney. They stopped walking and the boys sat Leeli down on the grass while they bent over to catch their breath.

“Where do you suppose he is?” Tink said between gulps of air.

“I don’t know,” Janner said, pacing.

“Maybe he went to see the dragons this year,” Tink said doubtfully.

“But he never goes to the cliffs on Dragon Day. Why would he go this time?” Leeli said.

“Well, why wouldn’t he be here at the cottage? I think we should look for him there,” Tink said. “Then we might see the dragons after all–” A glare from Janner cut him off. Janner looked east in the direction of the sea. Maybe Tink was right. Maybe for some reason Podo had decided to watch the dragons this year.

“Fine,” Janner said. “Come on. But we’re taking the scarp trail. We can’t risk the main road. There will probably be Fangs everywhere, and it’s faster anyway.”

Tink moaned, but Janner was already helping Leeli toward the trail.
_
The Igiby cottage sat on the eastern edge of Glipwood. An old walking path led through the trees behind the cottage and wound precariously near the edge of the cliffs. In the deepening shadows the Igiby children made their way through the trees.

When they emerged, the view was terrible and vast. Shale and tough grass littered the rocky verge of the land. The horizon was silent and wide, and a salty wind sighed upwards, around their ankles and through their hair. The children stood without speaking, dizzy with the smallness they felt looking out over the Dark Sea of Darkness. Janner looked to his right and could make out a precarious trail winding over stone and brush, leading away to where the people would be watching the dragons. The scarp trail stayed mostly level on a narrow shelf while the ground nearer the tree line rose steeply above them.

Wiry shrubs and roots clutched the rock wall as if they too were afraid of falling.

“Janner, I can’t do this,” Tink said. He was standing with his back against the gray rock, eyes clenched shut.

“You have to,” Janner said. “The Fangs that might find us on the road are more dangerous than this trail right now. You have to try, Tink.”

Using the nearby boulders for support, Leeli hopped back to him and took his hand. “Come on,” she said. Tink jerked his hand away and forced a smile.

“I’m not really worried about me, you know. I just meant that, uh, I don’t think Leeli should be out here.”

“Oh, thank you,” Leeli said wryly.

Tink sighed and peeled his fingers from the rock. He inched along behind Leeli and Janner, careful to stay as far as possible from the edge. As the light faded, the trail rose and narrowed. They had to stop again for Tink to gather the courage to follow. Janner kept looking back to be sure that Leeli was able to navigate the trail without her crutch. But with Nugget at her side and all manner of roots and rocks to hold, she seemed more like she was taking a stroll through a park than edging along a perch above the Dark Sea.

Finally, they topped the rise in the trail and it widened out to a grassy slope. Janner and Leeli tried not to laugh when Tink burst ahead of them and paced the safe ground. His shirt was drenched in sweat and he was strutting like he had just won a race. Ahead and below them Janner saw the glow of torches where the people were gathered to watch the dragons.

“We made it,” Janner said. “Tink, help me with Leeli.” As they scrambled down the slope toward the throng, the moon began its soft ascent. Then they heard the most achingly beautiful sound in all of Aerwiar.

CHAPTER 10: LEELI AND THE DRAGON SONG

Along warm note like the sound of a yawning mountain rose in the air and bounced off the belly of the sky. The deep echo was absorbed by the tall trees of Glipwood Forest and was answered a moment later by a higher sound that felt like a soft rain. Even Janner forgot to worry over the Fangs for a moment. His chest tightened and his eyes stung with tears.

“Quick!” Tink said. “It’s starting!” Tink ran ahead, dangerously close to the cliff. His fear of heights was all but gone. “Tink!” Janner called. But there was no stopping him. The sound of the dragons had changed Tink somehow. Janner even thought for a moment that he looked different, boldly making his way along the precipice. Janner and Leeli moved as quickly as they dared till they could make out the dark cluster of the people watching the ocean below them. The verge of the cliffs was cluttered with boulders between patches of tall grass, places where one could sit and comfortably watch the sea.

The Dark Sea was so far below that it seemed if someone were to tumble over the cliff they would have time to stop screaming and take a final, breezy nap before crashing into it. The tiny, silent streaks of white on its surface were actually chaotic waves smashing into the jagged rocks below, and the mightiest spray was only faintly visible, like a poof of dust from a pebble dropped in the sand.

Janner and Leeli found Tink sitting on a flat outcropping of rock that depressed in the center. They were still an arrow’s shot away from the crowd, enough to satisfy Janner that they were well hidden. By the light of the big moon, Tink leaned out over the edge, straining to see something in the dark water below. Just that morning, Janner thought to himself, Tink had nearly wet himself on the roof of the house. From where they sat they could see the mighty Fingap Falls far to the north, roaring over the cliffs and pounding into the sea. To the south, the cliffs marched away into the distance, where they eventually curled backward and sloped downward to embraced Shard Harbor, home to Fort Lamendron, the largest Fang outpost in all of Skree. It was there that the Black Carriage bore the children taken in the night.

Janner shuddered and tried not to think about Fort Lamendron or the Carriage. It wasn’t hard, because the dragon song was rising in pitch and volume. Hidden in their cleft of rock, Janner forgot about the Fangs. He forgot about their desperate need to find their grandfather and mother.

And, like Tink, he forgot how precarious were the edges of the high cliffs as he leaned out over the empty air and felt his heart ache. Tink was the first to see them. His breath caught in his throat and he found that he couldn’t speak. He tapped Leeli on the knee with the back of his hand and pointed. She and Janner saw it as well.

In the churning white waters at the base of Fingap Falls, a long, graceful shape burst from the surface. Its skin caught and magnified he light of the moon. The sea dragon was easily twice the height of the tallest tree in Glipwood Forest. Its reddish body glimmered like a living fire. The head was crowned with two curved horns and its fins spread out behind it like wings. Indeed, it looked as if it might actually fly, but the dragon wheeled in the air and crashed into the sea with what must have been a sound like thunder but was inaudible over the constant roar of the waterfall. The dragon song rose into the air on a bright wind and filled the people gathered on the cliffs with a thousand feelings; some peaceful, some exhilarating, all more alive than usual.

A middle-aged man named Robesbus Nicefellow, who had wasted his life balancing records for the famed button merchant Osbeck Osbeckson of Torrboro, decided that he wouldn’t spend another day working behind a desk; he had always wanted to sail. Mr. Alep Brume, who was sitting beside Ferinia Swapelton (proprietor of Ferinia’s Flower Shop), turned to her and whispered that he’d secretly loved her for years. Mayor Blaggus silently swore he’d never again pick his nose.*

All of the passion and sadness and joy of those who listened wound into one common strand of feeling that was to Janner like homesickness, though he couldn’t think why; he was a short walk from the only home he’d ever known.

The few Fangs unlucky enough to stand watch at the cliffs, however, heard only screeching, a miserable wail that set their teeth on edge. Their green skin shivered and they snarled at the people closest to them.

Tink was leaning so far over the edge that it looked like he might fall to the sea. Eyes wide open, his jaw was clenched and his knuckles were white where they gripped the rock at his sides. He was as handsome as a king, Janner thought, so rigid and serene as he perched there in the warm dusk.

The song continued, and more dragons exploded out of the water the same as the first. They spun in the air and hung there for a moment before slamming back into the sea. Scores of horned bull dragons, amber and shimmering gold, swam circles around the thinner and more fleet mares that burst out of the water and over them in an intricate pattern. Now even the roar of Fingap Falls was not as loud as the crash of the many dragons into the Dark Sea. The strains of the song entwined and followed one another until a haunting melody emerged. Janner thought, as he thought every summer the dragons came, that there could be nothing more beautiful in all the world.

Leeli was still as a statue, her hands clasped at her chest. Janner heard a whisper of sound mingling with the dragon song. Her lips were moving like she was trying to remember the words to a song, or like she was praying. Her gaze was far away, resting somewhere beyond the dragons. A slight, sweet melody, the beauty of which Janner had never heard before, drifted from Leeli’s mouth. Janner looked at her with wonder. He was so enthralled with her song he scarcely noticed that after a moment it was all he heard.

The dragons had fallen silent.

They had halted their dance and were gazing up at the cliffs. Though they were leagues away and the dusk made it difficult to see, Janner knew with a shudder that the sea dragons were watching them. They were listening.

The breezy sound of gasps and whispers came from the crowd to Janner’s right; in all the years the dragons had come, this was something new. Tink and Janner looked in awe at Leeli, who seemed unaware of the quiet commotion she was causing. The wind carried Leeli’s voice along the cliffs so that it seemed to the crowd that the song was coming from the air itself.

Finally her melody came to an end. Leeli came to herself and focused on the shimmering beasts below her, silent and watching. For a moment the only sound was the wind and the sea. Then the dragons arched their great necks, spread wide their fins, and bellowed an answer that rattled Janner’s teeth. It echoed Leeli’s tune in a sad, hopeful reprise.

Then it stopped.

The dragons were gone as fast as they had come. The last fin disappeared in a swirl of water. Only the dull, even rush of Fingap Falls and the occasional cry of a gull interrupted the awed silence. Then Mr. Alep Brume blew his nose. Whispers turned to hushed voices, which finally became the chattering of the multitude standing and stretching, then turning to walk back to town. The moment was over. The dragons would make their way, so people said, back south to the Sunken Mountains to live out the winter.

Tink was still staring at the sea, at the place where the last dragon had sunk away. He blinked several times and came out of a trance of his own. He looked down, his face turned pale and he squealed like a flabbit. He skittered back and lay panting on the ground five feet away, clutching the grass as if the world might lurch to its side and try to shake him over the edge. Leeli giggled, her head full of music.

“What was that, Leeli?” Janner asked.

She shrugged, blushing. “I don’t know. I think it’s a song mama used to sing me when I was little, or something like it anyway.” She scrunched her face up, thinking hard. “It’s odd,” she said.

“What?”

“I can’t remember it now,” Leeli said gazing at the Dark Sea.

“Well, it was…really pretty,” Janner said, unused to speaking that way with his sister. He was about to suggest that they find Podo and their mother when two cold hands grabbed him from behind. Janner was spun around violently to find himself face to face with the Slarb the Fang, who had a swollen, bleeding wound on the side of his scaly face.

* Mayor Blaggus broke his vow on the walk back to town

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 44 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 45 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2013

    Awesome

    Awesome!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 6, 2012

    Better than Hunger Games

    I read the whole sega and im surprised thet havent made a movie

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2012

    Great Read Aloud!

    I just finished this as a read-aloud with my daughter (7 1/2) and son (5 1/2). We all absolutely loved it! There were some tense/scary moments, so read it with caution if your kiddos are younger. you know them best and what themes they can/cannot handle.

    One thing more, please don't let this review think this is merely a child's story. I loved it just as much as they did, and I think my husband might pick it up next. This is a novel for everyone!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2012

    I love it!!!

    I have read all three of Adrew pedersons books and love them i have 1 book sighned by him. I like adrew pedersons songs and books my siblings and i enjoy the ballad of matthew begots and the song that goes with it. I sighed up for a contest last year that andrew pederson held it was a drawing contest and you draw a picture from the story and send it to him. It was really fun.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2010

    At the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness

    Everything was great in the land of Skree no children were taken away by the black carriage and the land was peaceful until the fangs and their ruler Gnag the Nameless took over. The fangs are like humans except for their snouts, scales, fangs, claws, and tail. In the book At the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness the Skreeans have to fill out a legal document just to borrow a gardening tool, so, as you can see the fangs have a lot of control.
    In this story three children named Janner, Tink, and Leeli are living a normal life of a Skreean which, by the way, wasn't very good until they are caught by some fangs and then rescued by a mysterious figure. Later that day, Janner hears his mother Nia and his grandfather, Podo, talking about who the figure was. When he hears this, he wonders who the figure is and what else they are hiding. If you want to find out what happens next, you'll just have to read the book.
    Andrew Peterson the author of At the edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness has a wife two boys and one girl. He is also a musical artist. Another book by him is the Ballad of Mathew's Begats: An Unlikely Royal Family Tree.
    When I read this book I was reminded of my own siblings and how we go on adventures of our own just like the three children in the book.
    I recommend this book to anyone who likes adventure, peril, and mysteries.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2014

    Incredibly enteraining.

    This book is excellently written and contains an enourmous amount of wit. I would highly suggest buying it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2014

    Its lik Great book

    Its like the series of unfotunate events

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2013

    READ READ READ!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    I have read all three they are so gooood. The third one leaves you hanging cant wait for the fourth one!!!!!!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2013

    Awesome

    This is the greatest book ive ever read

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  • Posted October 9, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness

    'On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness' by Andrew Peterson is a wonderfully crafted tale! The characters are so well written that I connected to them immediately. The story moves at such a fast pace, that I was able to this book in one sitting. The 'Jewels of Anniera' are mentioned all throughout the book and I kept wondering "What do they look like?" and "Where are they?". When I reached the end of the book, I finally found out where they were and why they were so important.

    There were a couple of times that the story was a bit slow. It is for this reason that I didn't give it five stars.

    Though Fantasy isn't a genre that I usually read, I found this book to be very enjoyable and will definitely be reading the next book 'North, or be Eaten'. I think that this is a book that all ages can enjoy.

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  • Posted August 21, 2011

    Great book!

    I am half way through and this is a great buy! Good story, good plot, and great characters! Andrew Peterson is a good singer/songwriter as well as a great author.

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  • Posted August 8, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Good series

    Kinda like Lord of The Rings.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2011

    Delightfully Entertaining

    I was surprised to find myself enjoying the book because I originally thought it was going to be another disappointing children's story. On the contrary, it was an entertaining book which was well though through and pleasantly written. It's easy text and exciting plot make for an enjoyable reading.

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  • Posted March 15, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Andrew Peterson- The C.S. Lewis of This Generation

    Andrew Peterson has truly outdone himself in this gripping, and imaginative tale- woven with humor, danger, and a tender love that will appeal to the whole family.
    High on the cliffs overlooking the Sea of Darkness, in the land of Skree, the three Igiby children- Janner, Tink, And Leeli- are sent sprawling head-first into a world of unimaginable danger and adventure. Harassed by the Fangs of Dang, and hunted by Toothy-Cows and Horned-Hounds, the children are faced with questions about their past- their absent father whom the can't remember, and the 'lost Jewels of Anniera' that their mother and former-pirate-grandfather only speak of in whispers when the children are supposed to be asleep- these are hard questions for curious children to simply leave unanswered. With cheesy-chowder in their bellies, an ancient map in hand, and their faithful dog to protect them, what could possibly go wrong?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2010

    On the Edge of the Dark Sea of Darkness

    Enjoyable read. Keeps you reading to see what will happen next.

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  • Posted November 12, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Who Knew He could write books too?

    I loved both books in this series! I found several characters that I could use in lessons I teach, I found some lessons that kids and pre-teens could use that were already spelled out!
    I actually found myself anxious to get back to the book just to find out how the next adventure was going to end! What were they going to do to get into trouble, and what else could possibly happen to make it worse?! They were truely good books that pretty much anyone could enjoy. They may have been written for children, but, children of all ages can get something out of them.

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  • Posted October 14, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A wonderfully witty new voice in teen fantasy

    The Igby children, Janner, Tink, and Leeli, manage to anger a vicious Fang and are thrown into jail. Janner is certain that they will be taken away in the Black Carriage, forever slaves of Gnag the Nameless. But before the carriage arrives, their mother bails them out with a handful of precious jewels.

    Janner is curious where the jewels came from, and he's not the only one. The Fangs come after them again, this time seeking the precious Jewels of Anniera they are certain the Igbys are hiding. The chase takes the Igby family far into Glipwood Forest where toothy cows and horned hounds abound.

    This book was a big-and pleasant-surprise. Andrew Peterson has a wonderfully witty voice. He reminds me of an easier-to-understand Douglas Adams with his satirical style of writing. The book is interesting from the start, though it takes a while to come to the plot. The ending was full of great stuff that made me really excited to read the next book in the series. I really enjoyed this one a lot.

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  • Posted November 6, 2008

    Amazing Story

    Andrew Peterson is, in addition to my favorite lyricist, a fantastic storyteller! It's great to read from someone who has the same love of God and love of a great story that was shared by C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien themselves.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2008

    Tolkien and Lewis, meet Andrew Peterson

    Andrew Peterson has created a wonderful tale full of action and humor. The fake footnotes scattered throughout the book really draw the reader into the world of Aerwiar. I highly recommend this book to everyone, both young and old. I'm going to put the Wingfeather Saga on my bookshelf right between 'The Chronicles of Narnia' and 'The Lord of the Rings.' I can't wait until the next one comes out!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 23, 2008

    An amazing songwriter writes a fantastic first book!

    Andrew understands sub-creation like Lewis and Tolkien did. This is a wonderful first novel with great characters, lots of humor for young and old. I loved the fake footnotes. I will be reading this for the Grandkids and buying several copies as gifts! Thanks Andrew!

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