On the Genealogy of Morals (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)
  • Alternative view 1 of On the Genealogy of Morals (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)
  • Alternative view 2 of On the Genealogy of Morals (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)
  • Alternative view 3 of On the Genealogy of Morals (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)
<Previous >Next

On the Genealogy of Morals (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)

4.2 5
by Friedrich Nietzsche
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

Nietzsche referred to his critique of Judeo-Christian moral values as "philosophizing with the hammer." On the Genealogy of Morals (originally subtitled A Polemic) is divided into three essays. The first is an investigation into the origins of our moral values, or as Nietzsche calls them "moral prejudices." The second essay addresses the concept of guilt…  See more details below

Overview

Nietzsche referred to his critique of Judeo-Christian moral values as "philosophizing with the hammer." On the Genealogy of Morals (originally subtitled A Polemic) is divided into three essays. The first is an investigation into the origins of our moral values, or as Nietzsche calls them "moral prejudices." The second essay addresses the concept of guilt and its role in the development of civilization and religion. The third essay considers suffering and its role in human existence. What might be of most value to today's reader is not necessarily Nietzsche's views on particular ethical issues, but rather his encouragement to think independently and to actualize the self.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780760780817
Publisher:
Barnes & Noble
Publication date:
09/21/2006
Series:
Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
226,394
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.50(d)

Meet the Author

Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche was born in the village of Rocken in Saxony on October 15, 1844. Nietzsche, whose father was a Lutheran pastor, spent a year as a theology student at the University of Bonn, before studying classical philology at the University of Leipzig. Despite poor health and desperate loneliness, Nietzsche managed to produce a book (or a book-length supplement to an earlier publication) every year from 1878 to 1887. In early January 1889, he collapsed in the street in Turin, Italy, confused and incoherent. He spent the last eleven years of his life institutionalized or under the care of his family.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

On the Genealogy of Morals (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
In short, he provides an interesting perspective to an ongoing and incredibly complex problem, that being the story of morality. It's not to be taken as completely right or wrong, so keep that in mind. Also, the other reviews are embarrassing... Let's get a couple things cleared up. 1) He is not anti-&quot;semetic.&quot; He sees that slave morality derives form Jewish hatred, but that does not mean that he is speaking out against, slave morality, Jews, or even hatred. 2) It is hard to read because in this &quot;book,&quot; he is expecting that you have read his other works critically, so there are a lot of references to be missed. Also, he is a philologist... he uses other words and roots from multiple languages to justify and convey his points, giving them validity from an eclectic use of language roots, if you will. 3) It's genius... Come on. That's about that. I would highly suggest Nietzsche, just come back to this one when you have a better understanding of him, or you will be disappointed, as Cobalt_TiNor was, which is why the two star rating is not deserved (because of ignorance).
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Cobalt_TiNor More than 1 year ago
I don't know if it was just Nietzsche's writing or Horace B. Samuels translation.... but this book was very difficult to read. I understand that it was translated from German or whatever but why is there an entire paragraph in Latin and various sentences and quotes from multiple different languages. Other than the difficulty reading it and Nietzsche just being biased, it was an interesting book, not sure if I'm interested in reading more of his stuff but I know I will.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This man is a great. I strongly suggest reading his numerous works. His insight on humankind is spectacular. I recommend this to all seeking knowledge and wisom. Philosophy is an eye-opening path of self importance and Nietzsche is the PERFECT religious philosopher for those wishing to explore their options.