On the God of the Christians: (and on one or two others)

On the God of the Christians: (and on one or two others)

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by Remi Brague
     
 

On the God of the Christians tries to explain how Christians conceive of the God whom they worship. No proof for His existence is offered, but simply a description of the Christian image of God.
    The first step consists in doing away with some commonly held opinions that put them together with the other “monotheists,”

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Overview

On the God of the Christians tries to explain how Christians conceive of the God whom they worship. No proof for His existence is offered, but simply a description of the Christian image of God.
    The first step consists in doing away with some commonly held opinions that put them together with the other “monotheists,” “religions of the book,” and “religions of Abraham.”
    Christians do believe in one God, but they do not conceive of its being one in the same way as other “monotheists,” like the first of them, the pharaoh Akhenaton (18th century before J.C.), like some philosophers, e.g., Aristotle, or like Islam.
    Christians admit the authority of a Holy Book, but don’t consider it as being the peak of God’s revelation. For them, revelation culminates in the person, life, and doings of Jesus - including his passion and resurrection.
    Christians acknowledge the exemplary figure of Abraham, but the stories they tell about him they share with Jews, but not with Muslims, who see in him the first Muslim.
    The Trinity is not a way to loosen the exclusivity of the only God. It is the very way in which God is one, i.e., in the inner richness and fecundity of love.
    The God of the Christians is Father, but not male. Human males become fathers through the mediation of a female. God is so radically the Father of everything and, in a very special sense, of the eternal Son, that He is not in need of a partner. His fatherhood can in no way legitimate the superiority of the male over the female sex.
    The God of the Christians doesn’t want us to obey Him in order to enslave us; He expects us to act freely according to what is good for us. Now, the Good is not something that He has in store and bestows on His creatures. The Good is what He is and He is the Good of His creatures.
    The God of the Christians is merciful, but He takes seriously man’s freedom, even when man doesn’t accept Him. Hence, He doesn’t content Himself with forgiving fromthe outside. He has to contrive a system (technically speaking: salvation history or “economy of salvation”) that will enable Man freely to accept His love.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781587313455
Publisher:
St. Augustine's Press
Publication date:
06/14/2013
Pages:
176
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.90(d)

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On the God of the Christians: (and on one or two others) 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
New atheists generally betray crass ignorance about the Christian idea of God, or even the idea of God in the best religious traditions of the world. However, the misconceptions that many believers, including devout Christians, harbor about the deity they worship are similarly unfortunate. Now, the great French scholar Rémi Brague has penned a terrific book clarifying the Christian notion of God. His first step is to clear the recent bad habit of including Christianity among the “religions of the book”. Revelation for Christians is not a book but a person, the person of Jesus of Nazareth, a real human being whom they believe to be Son of God. Then Brague helps the reader understand three key ideas about God: the God of the Christians has already spoken everything in Jesus; the God of the Christians asks nothing of us; and the God of the Christians is a God who offers to all forgiveness and remission of sins. For atheists this book should be a sort of academic duty. For Christian believers, it should be required reading. As Baron von Hugel put it in a letter to his niece Gwendolyn, “Before people worry about the Church or even about Christ, they must be helped to get their notions as to God sound and strong.” Brague’s book is a triumph of clear, illuminating, and liberating thinking about God.