On the Origin of Species [NOOK Book]

On the Origin of Species

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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940149353088
  • Publisher: Consumer Oriented Ebooks Publisher
  • Publication date: 5/15/2014
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 1,314,514
  • File size: 429 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 5 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 27, 2010

    Response to an Outdated Theory

    First of all, to the anonymous person, do a little research and look up the fish called Tiktaalik. Scientists have found fossils of this ancient fish that link it to amphibians. Its skull has spiracles on the top of it which suggest some sort of primitive lung. As for your rant on principle such as irreducible complexity, that too has been refuted. Perhaps you can look up the Dover Area School district case and Kenneth Miller's testimony against irreducible complexity and the bacterial flagellum. Also, Darwin never said humans evolved from Apes. That myth is actually from queen Victoria who misread this very book and deduced that to be so. And as you can imagine, in that time, for royalty to compare with a beast like a chimpanzee did not go over so well and she disregarded this book. Although the theory of evolution is a theory, gravity and other scientific presumptions such as Cell Theory are also theories but nobody in their right mind would deny that gravity exists now would they? Even if something were to fall up would you still deduce that gravity is false?

    8 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 5, 2014

    A must read, but not for the casual person interested in natural

    A must read, but not for the casual person interested in natural science to refute his fundalmentalist grandmother. Rather it's more strongly supports the matriach if compared to our knowledge of modern science. His idea of "the problem of speciation" p.44 is one of intrigue demonstrating that Darwin 'was ahead of his time.' Truly today's idea of what 'speciation' has come to mean blurs any concrete definition, this in spite of the father of evolution predicting a debasing of scientific credibility if 'speciation' were left without being consicely defined. Are Darwin's finches in the Galapagos Islands a newly evolved species? If you fall on the side of yes, then we have millions of newly formed modern species. If one considers that the island finch species interbreed whenever el ninos flow that way, the evidence must be reconsidered. I found especially interesting, getting to read the forefather's formulation of 1)natural selection, 2) random mutation, and 3) genetic adaptation. You can see how evolution, in the micro sense, strongly supports today's state of life and living relationships, as well as rampant sub-speication, but not in the macro where supposedly new specie creation has been observed. Missing from the theory is any support of evolution being an abiogenisis in any manner, thus the book's title, "The Orgin of Species" leaves one wondering, just what caused that 1st spontaneous generation of life? It makes for a wonderful story and should be included in every avid scientist's library.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 15, 2015

    The Open Road Media ebook edition is missing an illustration fro

    The Open Road Media ebook edition is missing an illustration from the original paper edition that is used in the explanation of divergence of characteristics over generations.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2015

    Good book

    This story has very good information about the different spieces this story has different ( readings ) so this would be a good book this book helps future scientists learn more about he different specimens on earth it will do very well in helping you learn more things about specimens it will help young readers learn more about different specimens in conclusion this a good book there should be more thank you author!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 16, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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