On the Priesthood, Ascetic Teatises, Select Homilies and Letters; Homilies on the Statues

On the Priesthood, Ascetic Teatises, Select Homilies and Letters; Homilies on the Statues

3.5 4
by St. John chrysostom
     
 
According to Wikipedia: "Saint John Chrysostom (c. 347-407, Greek: ??????? ? ??'s'st?�??), archbishop of Constantinople, was an important Early Church Father. He is known for his eloquence in preaching and public speaking, his denunciation of abuse of authority by both ecclesiastical and political leaders, the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, and his

Overview

According to Wikipedia: "Saint John Chrysostom (c. 347-407, Greek: ??????? ? ??'s'st?�??), archbishop of Constantinople, was an important Early Church Father. He is known for his eloquence in preaching and public speaking, his denunciation of abuse of authority by both ecclesiastical and political leaders, the Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom, and his ascetic sensibilities. After his death (or, according to some sources, during his life) he was given the Greek surname chrysostomos, meaning "golden mouthed", rendered in English as Chrysostom.
The Orthodox and Eastern Catholic Churches honor him as a saint (feast days: November 13 and January 27) and count him among the Three Holy Hierarchs (feast day, January 30), together with Saints Basil the Great and Gregory Nazianzus. He is recognized by the Roman Catholic Church as a saint and Doctor of the Church."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940000773352
Publisher:
B&R Samizdat Express
Publication date:
02/01/2009
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
890,534
File size:
2 MB

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On the Priesthood, Ascetic Teatises, Select Homilies and Letters; Homilies on the Statues 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
the author that did the introduction confuses his facts and theology and shows what is clearly a mix of anglo-presbyterian bias against orthodoxy and roman catholicism! I recommend skipping the intro and going straight for the text that begins on page 35.
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