On Time: From Seasons to Split Seconds

Overview

A fascinating tour of time measurement through the ages. Children discover how humans learned to recognize time and began to measure it in smaller and smaller units from the precisely placed boulders at Stonehenge, which marked the equinoxes; to Egyptian obelisks, which measured the hours; to modern-day atomic clocks, which subdivide seconds.

Examines the ways humans have measured time throughout history and discusses the various ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$15.34
BN.com price
(Save 14%)$17.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (18) from $1.99   
  • New (8) from $4.98   
  • Used (10) from $1.99   
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.
Sending request ...

Overview

A fascinating tour of time measurement through the ages. Children discover how humans learned to recognize time and began to measure it in smaller and smaller units from the precisely placed boulders at Stonehenge, which marked the equinoxes; to Egyptian obelisks, which measured the hours; to modern-day atomic clocks, which subdivide seconds.

Examines the ways humans have measured time throughout history and discusses the various units that are used to keep track of it.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Greg M. Romaneck
The concept of time is, by its very nature, both simple and complex. On a daily basis, people struggle to meet deadlines, be timely, and make good use of their time. Yet, what exactly is time and how have past societies attempted to measure it? These questions are addressed in this fascinating scientific study. The story begins with prehistoric human efforts to grasp the changing seasons. Later, people stopped relying solely upon lunar and solar traits to determine the date and time. They progressed to the development of calendars and various sundry approaches to chronology. Early sun dials, water clocks, and hourglasses are each presented as stages in mankind's efforts to measure time. As people reached out to travel the vast oceans or to use more complicated transport such as railroads, accuracy in time telling became increasingly essential. In the modern era, the boundaries between space and time have blurred as scientists observe the light of stars long extinct which has taken trillions of years to reach their eyes. All in all, this book provides a novel look at a subject that affects each of us all the time.
School Library Journal
Gr 4-7-This attractive offering is brimming with information about time and timekeeping, from seasons, years, and time zones to pendulums, hourglasses, and femtoseconds. The conversational tone helps readers get through the more difficult concepts, such as looking backward into deep time and deep space. Readers get a historical glimpse at the Tower of Winds, a laborious water clock built in Greece in 50 B.C. and Christopher Columbus's clever use of a lunar eclipse to win over the Haitian natives. Although the traditional "B.C." and "A.D." divisions are discussed, the more current "B.C.E." and "C.E." are not mentioned. The fact that hours, weeks, and months are man-made divisions is clearly explained. Skurzynski states that our January 1, 2000 occurs during the Hebrew year 5760 and the Islamic year 1420 A.H. The book is heavily illustrated with full-color drawings, photographs, and diagrams. It could be paired with Gillian Chapman's excellent Exploring Time (Millbrook, 1995), which offers related activities. On Time will find audiences with report writers and pleasure readers, as well as their teachers.-Anne Chapman Callaghan, Racine Public Library, WI Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780792275039
  • Publisher: National Geographic Society
  • Publication date: 4/28/2000
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 453,896
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: 1040L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 8.75 (w) x 11.25 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Gloria Skurzynski has written more than 30 children’s books. Her nonfiction book, Almost the Real Thing, won the American Institute of Physics Science Writing Award. She has written several nonfiction books for National Geographic including Are We Alone, an NSTA Outstanding Science Trade Book for Young People and an IRA/CBC Young Adults’ Choice for 2006. She lives in Boise, ID. Visit Gloria Skurzynski at her Web site: www.gloriabooks.com.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)