Once Upon a Blue Moose

Once Upon a Blue Moose

4.2 5
by Daniel Pinkwater
     
 

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Once upon a blue moose, there was a little restaurant at the edge of the big woods. Mr. Breton was happy running the restaurant. He liked to cook, but he didn’t like it much when winter came and the north wind blew and froze everything solid.
Then one day a blue moose, who also didn’t like the cold, came to his door and asked to come in. Mr. Breton

Overview

Once upon a blue moose, there was a little restaurant at the edge of the big woods. Mr. Breton was happy running the restaurant. He liked to cook, but he didn’t like it much when winter came and the north wind blew and froze everything solid.
Then one day a blue moose, who also didn’t like the cold, came to his door and asked to come in. Mr. Breton said sure, and served the moose some clam chowder. The moose liked the soup, and decided to stay. From that time on, things at the restaurant began to hum.
Join the Blue Moose in this hilarious collection of three short novels as he learns to wait tables, writes a novel, goes to Hollywood, solves a mystery, and makes you laugh even in the dark of the cold woods.
Includes new wacky but true moose facts!


From the Trade Paperback edition.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780307489050
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
05/06/2009
Sold by:
Random House
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
160
Sales rank:
871,824
File size:
8 MB
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt

MOOSE
MEETING

Mr. Breton had a little restaurant on the edge of the big woods. There was nothing north of Mr. Breton's house except nothing, with trees in between. When winter came, the north wind blew through the trees and froze everything solid. Then it would snow. Mr. Breton didn't like it.
Mr. Breton was a very good cook. Every day, people from the town came to his restaurant. They ate gallons of his special clam chowder. They ate plates of his special beef stew. They ate fish stew and Mr. Breton's special homemade bread. The people from the town never talked much and they never said anything about his cooking.

"Did you like your clam chowder?" Mr. Breton would ask.

"Yup," the people from the town would say.

Mr. Breton wished they would say, "Delicious!" or, "Good chowder, Breton!" All they ever said was, "Yup." In winter they came on skis and snowshoes.

Every morning Mr. Breton went out behind his house to get firewood. He wore three sweaters, a scarf, galoshes, a woolen hat, a big checkered coat, and mittens. He still felt cold. Sometimes animals came out of the woods to watch Mr. Breton. Raccoons and rabbits came. The cold didn't bother them. It bothered Mr. Breton even more when they watched him.

One morning there was a moose in Mr. Breton's yard. It was a blue moose. When Mr. Breton went out his back door, the moose was there, looking at him. After a while, Mr. Breton went back in, closed the door, and made a pot of coffee while he waited for the moose to go away. It didn't go away; it just stood in Mr. Breton's yard, looking at his back door. Mr. Breton drank a cup of coffee. The moose stood in the yard. Mr. Breton opened the door again. "Shoo! Go away!" he said.
"Do you mind if I come in and get warm?" the moose said. "I'm just about frozen." The moose brushed past him and walked into the kitchen. His antlers almost touched the ceiling.

The moose sat down on the floor next to Mr. Breton's stove. He closed his eyes and sat leaning toward the stove for a long time. Mr. Breton stood in the kitchen, looking at the moose. The moose didn't move. Wisps of steam began to rise from his blue fur. After a long time the moose sighed. It sounded like a foghorn.

"Can I get you a cup of coffee?" Mr. Breton asked the moose. "Or some clam chowder?"

"Clam chowder," said the moose.

Mr. Breton filled a bowl with creamy clam chowder and set it on the floor. The moose dipped his big nose into the bowl and snuffled up the chowder. He made a sort of slurping, whistling noise.

"Sir," the moose said, "this is wonderful clam chowder."

Mr. Breton blushed a very deep red. "Do you really mean that?"

"Sir," the moose said, "I have eaten some very good chowder in my time, and yours is the very best."

"Oh my," said Mr. Breton, blushing even redder. "Oh my. Would you like some more?"

"Yes, with crackers," said the moose.

The moose ate seventeen bowls of chowder with crackers. Then he had twelve pieces of hot gingerbread and forty-eight cups of coffee. While the moose slurped and whistled, Mr. Breton sat in a chair. Every now and then he said to himself, "Oh my. The best he's ever eaten. Oh my."

Later, when some people from the town came to Mr. Breton's house, the moose met them at the door. "How many in your party, please?" the moose asked. "I have a table for you; please follow me."

The people from the town were surprised to see the moose. They felt like running away, but they were too surprised. The moose led them to a table, brought them menus, looked at each person, snorted, and clumped into the kitchen.

"There are some people outside; I'll take care of them," he told Mr. Breton.

The people were whispering to one another about the moose, when he clumped back to the table.

"Are you ready to order?"

"Yup," the people from the town said. They waited for the moose to ask them if they would like some chowder, the way Mr. Breton always did. But the moose just stared at them as though they were very foolish. The people felt uncomfortable. "We'll have the clam chowder."

"Chaudiere de Clam; very good," the moose said. "Do you desire crackers or homemade bread?"

"We will have crackers," said the people from the town.

"I suggest you have the bread; it is hot," said the moose.

"We will have bread," said the people from the town.

"And for dessert," said the moose, "will you have fresh gingerbread or Apple Jacquette?"

"What do you recommend?" asked the people from the town.

"After the Chaudiere de Clam, the gingerbread is best."

"Thank you," said the people from the town.

"It is my pleasure to serve you," said the moose.

The moose brought bowls of chowder balanced on his antlers.

At the end of the meal, the moose clumped to the table. "Has everything been to your satisfaction?" he asked.

"Yup," said the people from the town, their mouths full of gingerbread.

"I beg your pardon?" said the moose. "What did you say?"

"It was very good," said the people from the town. "It was the best we've ever eaten."

"I will tell the chef," said the moose.

The moose clumped into the kitchen and told Mr. Breton that the people from the town had said that the food was the best they had ever eaten. Mr. Breton rushed out of the kitchen and out of the house. The people from the town were sitting on the porch, putting on their snowshoes.

"Did you tell the moose that my clam chowder was the best you've ever eaten?" Mr. Breton asked.

"Yup," said the people from the town, "we said that. We think that you are the best cook in the world; we have always thought so."

"Always?" asked Mr. Breton.

"Of course," the people from the town said. "Why do you think we walk seven miles on snowshoes just to eat here?"

The people from the town walked away on their snowshoes. Mr. Breton sat on the edge of the porch and thought it over. When the moose came out to see why Mr. Breton was sitting outside without his coat on, Mr. Breton said, "Do you know, those people think I am the best cook in the whole world?"

"Of course they do," the moose said. "Do you want me to go into town to get some crackers? We seem to have run out."

"Yes," said Mr. Breton, "and get some asparagus too. I'm going to cook something special tomorrow."

"By the way," said the moose, "aren't you cold out here?"

"No, I'm not the least bit cold," Mr. Breton said. "This is turning out to be a very mild winter."

From the Trade Paperback edition.

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Once Upon a Blue Moose 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Blue Moose is my favorite book its been since at least the third grade and I'm going into seventh grade. It's an adorable story. I love the moose. I have read all the Harry Potter books and I am almost finished with the Chronicals of Narnia. I have read many novels I thought were fabulous, but nothing beats the heart warming story of The Blue Moose.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
MOOSES RULE MOOSE MOOSE MOOSE
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great!!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
You've never seen a blue moose? Well, you are about to meet a handsome, shade of Blue Moose in author Daniel Pinkwater's 'Once Upon A Blue Moose'. Blue Moose is the headwaiter at Mr. Breton's restaurant, which is set by the edge of a northern forest. People came from all over the territories to meet Blue Moose, and savor Mr. Breton's delicious cooking. Customers are charmed with Moose's service, and suggestions of menu specialties, and among them are game warden Mr. Bobowich, and hermit David. Blue Moose makes an exemplary partner for 'Chef'(the moniker which moose gave Mr. Breton.) Blue Moose decides to work in his room, using Chef's old typewriter, to transfer to type what he had written in 'longhoof'. When moose becomes discouraged, his sigh rattles windows, and for a period of five-weeks, Blue Moose has the 'blues', and seeks seclusion in his room. Blue Moose was writing a '¿great book, the most wonderful book ever written by man or moose'. The masterpiece entitled 'The True Story of a Wild Moose by D. Moosus Moosewater' is mailed to publishers Klotz, Yold & Company, Inc. It includes Blue Moose's encounter with a fifty-foot high Space Moose from the galaxy of Betelmoose. The raging, bully threatens Blue, '¿before I trample you into a moose-flavored pizza, I'll tell you exactly what I'm doing here¿'. Among many of Blue's adventures are his efforts to find the North American vampire moose--'Deadly Eric, the Moosepire', at the request of geographer Sir Charles Pacamac. Blue meets 'Nathan of the North', mountain man, scout, and a conservative Jewish rabbi, who shares his 'matzohs'. In Blue's boxcar living quarters, they ponder over the existence of the 'Moosepire'. Clues lead to the discovery of something magical. Daniel Pinkwater's book is Wunderbar, an enjoyable lot of moose-sense and gift for all readers, especially to yourself. Included are 'Moose Questions and Antlers', information such as, female moose give birth to twins or triplets moose have poor eyesight but excellent hearing and sense of smell they can run at 50 mph, and are the largest of the deer family, found in Alaska, Canada, and northern parts of the United States, Europe, Asia, and sometimes wandering moose visit New York City! Hopefully, there will be future Blue Moose adventures in Pinkwater's repertoire of young readers writings.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago