Once Upon a Marigold

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A young man with a mysterious past and a penchant for inventing things leaves the troll who raised him, meets an unhappy princess he has loved from afar, and discovers a plot against her and her father.

A young man with a mysterious past and a penchant for inventing things leaves the troll who raised him, meets an unhappy princess he has loved from afar, and discovers a plot against her and her father.

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Once Upon a Marigold (Upon a Marigold Series #1)

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Overview

A young man with a mysterious past and a penchant for inventing things leaves the troll who raised him, meets an unhappy princess he has loved from afar, and discovers a plot against her and her father.

A young man with a mysterious past and a penchant for inventing things leaves the troll who raised him, meets an unhappy princess he has loved from afar, and discovers a plot against her and her father.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Readers will gobble this story up."—VOYA
Publishers Weekly
A boy raised by a troll decides to see the world one day and discovers that lovely Princess Marigold, with whom he has corresponded, is about to become betrothed. "The author breathes new life into archetypal characters by adding unexpected and often humorous dimensions to their personalities," wrote PW. Ages 10-up. (June) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
With a beautiful princess, a love struck lad, a scheming queen, mistaken identities, and the battle between good versus evil, Once Upon a Marigold has all the classic elements of a fairy tale. But with carrier pigeon "p-mail," a princess who can read thoughts, and a prince with a lack for inventing, this story will entertain and capture the attention of today's modern young reader. Growing up with a troll for a dad, Christian enjoys the quiet life of the forest until he begins spying on the royal family with a telescope. Although he doesn't care for the trappings of court, he inexplicably finds himself falling in love with young Princess Marigold. Because of the distance—both physical and social—between the two, they are able to share their true feelings and thoughts with one another. The two come together in a tangled plot as a queen tries to get rid of Marigold, and Christian and Marigold try to overcome the pressures of society. With a surprise revelation, a flying contraption, and two loveable pets, this story comes to a satisfying, yet hip "happily ever after ending." This short novel would serve as a great companion to a study of fairy tales and the many spin-offs in literature today. 2002, Harcourt,
— Leah Hanson
From The Critics
This is a funny fairy tale about a little prince who runs away to the forest and finds a friendly troll to live with. Edric, the troll, really doesn't want to take the prince home with him, but is too kindhearted to leave him. Years pass and Prince Christian, who has forgotten about his royal lineage, falls in love with the princess who lives across the river. Through a series of misfortunes and adventures he wins the princess Marigold, and defeats the evil stepmother just as expected in fairy tales. The most non-traditional part of this story is Edric the Troll, who spices his speech with mangled proverbs as he advises his foster child/prince through his teenage growing pains. Young readers from middle to secondary levels will enjoy this tonguein- cheek tale about a troll, a prince, and the search for eternal love. 2002, Harcourt, 266 pp.,
— Freya Zipperer
School Library Journal
Gr 5-9-As the cover proclaims, this story is truly "part everything-but-the-kitchen-sink." Readers first meet Chris when he is a strong-willed, clever child of six. He has run away from home, determined to live on his own in the forest. Edric, a troll, finds him and gives him shelter but cannot make him go back home, and Chris grows up with Edric and his dogs as his family, guided by an etiquette book found in the forest and Edric's own wisdom. As the boy grows, he continues his interest in inventing and watches the princess in the castle across the river. She is headstrong but lonely, and when Chris contacts her by carrier pigeon (or p-mail), they become best friends. When he takes work at the castle, there is no way that Chris, a commoner, can tell Marigold who he is, and he can only stand by as she is to be married to an unsuitable suitor. When he learns that her life is in danger, he must find a way to save her and the kingdom. This complex, fast-paced plot, a mixture of fantasy, romance, comedy, and coming-of-age novel, succeeds because these characters are compelling, well developed, and sympathetic. Quirky personalities and comic subplots give the story additional texture. Readers will be drawn into this world and be satisfied by the denouement. This blend of genres will appeal to a wide range of readers, and it's all great fun.-Shara Alpern, The Free Library of Philadelphia Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Cold indeed is the heart not made warm by this bubbly fairy-tale romance. Raised by a kindly forest troll, Christian knows little of the world beyond what he can see through his telescope, but gazing upon a nearby castle, he falls head over heels for Princess Marigold. What chance has he, though, as a (supposed) commoner? When at last he nerves himself to send her a message via carrier pigeon, she answers and the courtship is on-via "p-mail" at first, then, after he lands a job as a castle servant, face to face. Setting numerous fairy-tale conventions just a bit askew, Ferris (Of Sound Mind, 2001, etc.) surrounds her two smart, immensely likable teenagers, who are obviously made for each other, with rival suitors, hyperactive dogs, surprising allies, and strong adversaries. The most notable among the last is devious, domineering Queen Olympia, intent on forcing Marigold into marriage with a penniless, but noble, cipher. The author gets her commonsensical couple to "I Do" through brisk palace intrigue, life-threatening situations, riotous feasting, and general chaos; Queen Olympia gets suitable comeuppance, and the festivities are capped by the required revelation that Christian is actually heir to the throne of neighboring Zandelphia. Fans of Gail Carson Levine's Princess Tales will be in familiar territory here, as well as seventh heaven. (Fiction. 11-13)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780152050849
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
  • Publication date: 6/1/2004
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 288
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 7.50 (w) x 4.96 (h) x 0.69 (d)

Meet the Author

JEAN FERRIS has written more than a dozen popular books for teens, including several ALA Best Books for Young Adults and one YALSA Teens' Top Ten Best Book. She lives in San Diego, California.

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Read an Excerpt

1
Edric knew he should head for home. It would be dark soon, and even though he was as familiar with his part of the forest as he was with the back and the front of his hand, there were dangers when the lights went out-wild animals, evil spirits, big glowing eyes attached to who-knew-what, stuff like that. But Beelzebub and Hecate were having such a good time sniffing under every bush and barking all the grouse out from their hiding places that Ed was reluctant to spoil their fun. Besides, he'd been having a very good day of gathering.
Some days there was nothing; nobody passing through the forest dropped a thing. But today he'd found a ring with a big shiny pink stone, a collapsible telescope, a book of Greek myths, an almost-new leather jerkin, and a flask half full (he knew there were some people who would have said half empty) of a quite palatable wine-rather frisky, with some floral notes and a nice, lingering, jaunty sort of finish. It had been a very good day indeed.
He heard the dogs yapping their heads off up ahead. Not an encouraging sign. He could tell Bub was working himself into a state, trying to act as fierce as he looked, and Cate was overemoting, as usual. Whatever they were barking at must have gone straight up a tree, taken off for parts unknown, or had a coronary.
"Hey, you guys!" Ed yelled. "Cut that out!" He came through the trees and saw the two dogs-big shaggy Beelzebub and petite well-groomed Hecate-in front of a clump of bushes, carrying on as if they didn't have a brain in either of their heads.
"Hey!" he yelled again. "Stop that!"
Abruptly they stopped barking. But both noses were pointed at the bushes, both tails out straight and quivering.
"What's in there?" Ed asked nervously. The light was fading through the trees, casting long shadows that wavered and fooled the eye into thinking threatening things lurked in the gloom. Or maybe the shadows weren't fooling at all.
"Come on," Edric said in a low voice. "Let's go home."
The dogs didn't move.
"Would you listen to me?" he pleaded, peering anxiously around as the light grew dimmer. If only he'd thought to bring along some squirrel knuckles, their favorite treat, he could have lured them away easily.
He wasn't supposed to be snaring squirrels, of course, since these were King Swithbert's woods, or maybe King Beaufort's-it was hard to tell where the boundaries between the two kingdoms lay-but who was going to miss a few squirrels when there were so many? Well, the other squirrels, maybe, but he didn't let himself think about that. Hayes Centaur, King Swithbert's gamekeeper, was conscientious (unlike King Beaufort's more laid-back Claypool Sasquatch) and would love nothing better than to catch Edric poaching a squirrel, but even he couldn't keep count of all the squirrels, or tell which were Swithbert's and which were Beaufort's.
Ed pushed his way between the dogs, who were quivering so hard that they sent up a faint hum. He extended the collapsible telescope and poked it gingerly into the bushes. "Hello?" he said tentatively.
"Hello," came a small voice.
Edric and the dogs jumped in unison.
"Who's in there?" Ed demanded gruffly, hoping he sounded seven feet tall instead of his actual three feet, four inches.
"Me," came the small voice. And a handsome little boy with big brown eyes and tousled brown hair-a few leaves clinging haphazardly to it-stuck his head out of the bushes. "Will those dogs eat me?" he asked solemnly.
Edric was so relieved, his knees went weak. "Naw," he said. "This one"-he put his hand on Beelzebub's shaggy neck and felt the dog's shivers of terror-"is a coward who hides behind his big bark. And this one"-he scratched Hecate's ears-"is a show-off who just wants to be the center of attention." Cate wagged her plumy tail vigorously and grinned.
"Who are you?" the boy asked, crawling farther out of the bushes.
"Edric's my name. But mostly I'm called Ed. And who are you?"
"Christian," the boy said. "I'm six."
"Well, come out of there, Christian, and tell me what you're doing here."
Christian crawled all the way out from the bushes and stood up. "I'm almost as big as you," he said, surprised.
Ed pulled himself to his full height. "I'm tall for a troll," he said defensively.
"I've never met a troll before," Christian said.
Ed stuck out his hand and shook Christian's. "Now you have. And what about you?"
"I'm a boy," Christian said seriously. "Can't you tell?"
"Well, sure. I know you're a boy. What I want to know is, where are your folks? It's almost dark out here."
"I don't know where they are now. They looked for me for a long time, but their voices got farther and farther away until I couldn't hear them at all."
"You mean you were hiding from them?" Ed asked. "Why?"
"I don't want to live with them anymore. It's too hard."
"So you thought you'd live in the forest? Do you have any idea how hard that would be for somebody wearing a...a...What is that? A velvet suit?"
"What should I wear instead?"
"What I mean is, somebody like you doesn't know anything about living in a forest. That cup of tea is definitely not down your alley, if you know what I mean. What would you do for shelter? Food? Heat? Protection?"
"I was going to live in that bush." Christian gestured. "It has berries on it."
Ed rolled his eyes. "I can see I'm beating my head against a dead horse. There are berries now because it's summer. There won't be any in a few more weeks." He considered for about half a second and then said, "You'd better come home with me. I can take you back to your folks in the morning."
Christian's lower lip came out. "I'll go with you now, but I won't go home in the morning. I don't even know where home is."
Ed put his hand on Christian's shoulder. "Let's get out of here. It'll be pitch-dark in a few minutes, and I don't want to run into any more surprises. We can finish this conversation once we're inside. Come on, Bub. Get going, Cate. Let's get this show on the ball."
Cate scampered ahead, throwing herself into her performance as a courageous guide dog. Bub, sticking close to Ed, could feel a sick headache coming on-he always got one after he'd had to be brave-and he could hardly wait to flop down in front of the fire and pull himself together.
"What's that shiny blue stuff up there?" Christian asked after they'd wound along narrow rutted paths for a while, doing their bests not to run into any trees, fall in any streams, or become supper for anything else wandering around out there.
"Where?" Ed asked. "Oh, yeah. Great! That's the cave. We're almost home." The dogs ran ahead and disappeared into the shadows.
"You live in a cave?" Christian asked. "Why is it blue?"
"It's blue, and red, and green, and pink, and purple, and yellow, too," Ed said. "It's a big cave with lots of rooms, and in each room the walls and ceilings are studded with a different kind of crystal. I don't know how, but they glow in the dark. Kind of pretty, don't you think?"
"Yeah," Christian breathed as they approached. "It looks like magic."
"Well, maybe it is. I don't know of another cave like it. When I discovered it, the entrance was all blocked by rocks and dirt. I was sick of being a nomad and knew I'd finally found my home. Trolls have to spend at least one hundred years of their lives in a cave; did you know that? It's a tradition. I've been here, oh, must be one hundred and seventeen years now."
In the large yellow-crystal room that Ed used for his main parlor, he built up the fire, stumbling repeatedly over Bub, who was laid out in front of it like a hearth rug, breathing deeply in relief at being safe at home.
For supper there was leftover raccoon ragout, seasoned with wild garlic, onion, parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme. There were acorn-meal biscuits and new strawberries and the wine Ed had found that day. When it was all gone, Ed let out a satisfied burp.
Christian imitated him and giggled. "If I did that at home, I'd be sent to my room," he said. "Actually, I'd be dragged off to my room, probably by my ear."
A bit drastic for a burp, Ed thought, but maybe he'd lived in a cave for so long he'd lost whatever social graces he might once have had.
"And you can forget about taking me back there," Christian went on. "I'm tired of being told what to do, and of being too clean, and of not being able to make a mess. Inventing is messy, and that's what I like to do. My parents will be glad I'm gone."
"I thought they searched for you all afternoon."
"Oh, they'll forget about me pretty soon. They have lots of other kids," Christian said. "Father never listens to me. And Mother only cares about how clean I am-and I'm never clean enough. The rest of the time she just wants to play bezique and piquet with her lady friends."
Ed could see there was no point in arguing with this kid. He figured he could manage to put up with the little squirt for one night and then he'd track down the parents and hand him over. "Come on," he said. "It's late. You can wear this for a nightshirt." He handed the boy a shirt of thin cambric that he had found beside a pond. Well, he had to admit he could see the owner of the shirt splashing in the pond, but he'd left him his boots and his breeches, hadn't he? What else did a body need to get home in on a warm summer day?
Ed made a bed for Christian out of furs in the dark-blue-crystal room. Sleeping in there was like sleeping up in the night sky with the glitter of stardust all around you. The little boy looked quite happy bedded down in the furs, the sleeves of his nightshirt rolled up four and a half times. As soon as he put his head down, both dogs came padding in to flop on either side of him.
With an arm around each furry neck, he murmured sleepily, "You can throw that stupid velvet suit away. I'm never wearing it again." Then his eyes closed, and three sets of soft snores rose to the shining ceiling.
"Who does he think he is?" Ed muttered, picking up the trail of discarded clothing as he went back to the fire in the yellow-crystal room. "Imperious little son of a gun, acting like some big cheese in a small pond, expecting me to pick up after him like I was his servant."
He dropped the clothing in front of the fire and sat on the picnic rug he'd found years before, way over on King Beaufort's side of the forest. It was a picnic that had been interrupted suddenly; he could tell that much from the scattered plates and utensils and food. Not that there was much food left. Whatever animal had come upon the picnickers had enjoyed the meal more than they had. But Ed had enjoyed the kitchenware, the hamper, the big napkins embroidered with the letter B, and the rug, all of which he'd hauled home.
He shook out each small item of clothing and dusted it off. As he folded the velvet shorts, he heard a faint tinkle. In the pocket he found a gold chain with a golden charm hanging from it. The charm was in the shape of a bird unlike any Ed had ever seen in the forest, though that certainly didn't mean it didn't exist. The world was full of fantastical creatures. The bird seemed to be part pheasant and part eagle.
Ed returned the chain to the pocket. Under other circumstances he would have added it to his collection, but he had a feeling the kid's parents would notice if it was missing. Then he wrapped the stack of clothing in one of the big picnic napkins, stashed the bundle in the hamper, and settled down with his briar pipe and the book of Greek myths. Nothing like a little fratricide, patricide, matricide, and infanticide to send a fellow right off to sleep.

Copyright © 2002 by Jean Ferris

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher.

Requests for permission to make copies of any part of the work should be mailed to the following address: Permissions Department, Harcourt, Inc.,
6277 Sea Harbor Drive, Orlando, Florida 32887-6777.

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First Chapter

1
Edric knew he should head for home. It would be dark soon, and even though he was as familiar with his part of the forest as he was with the back and the front of his hand, there were dangers when the lights went out-wild animals, evil spirits, big glowing eyes attached to who-knew-what, stuff like that. But Beelzebub and Hecate were having such a good time sniffing under every bush and barking all the grouse out from their hiding places that Ed was reluctant to spoil their fun. Besides, he'd been having a very good day of gathering.
Some days there was nothing; nobody passing through the forest dropped a thing. But today he'd found a ring with a big shiny pink stone, a collapsible telescope, a book of Greek myths, an almost-new leather jerkin, and a flask half full (he knew there were some people who would have said half empty) of a quite palatable wine-rather frisky, with some floral notes and a nice, lingering, jaunty sort of finish. It had been a very good day indeed.
He heard the dogs yapping their heads off up ahead. Not an encouraging sign. He could tell Bub was working himself into a state, trying to act as fierce as he looked, and Cate was overemoting, as usual. Whatever they were barking at must have gone straight up a tree, taken off for parts unknown, or had a coronary.
"Hey, you guys!" Ed yelled. "Cut that out!" He came through the trees and saw the two dogs-big shaggy Beelzebub and petite well-groomed Hecate-in front of a clump of bushes, carrying on as if they didn't have a brain in either of their heads.
"Hey!" he yelled again. "Stop that!"
Abruptly they stopped barking. But both noses were pointed at the bushes, both tails out straight and quivering.
"What's in there?" Ed asked nervously. The light was fading through the trees, casting long shadows that wavered and fooled the eye into thinking threatening things lurked in the gloom. Or maybe the shadows weren't fooling at all.
"Come on," Edric said in a low voice. "Let's go home."
The dogs didn't move.
"Would you listen to me?" he pleaded, peering anxiously around as the light grew dimmer. If only he'd thought to bring along some squirrel knuckles, their favorite treat, he could have lured them away easily.
He wasn't supposed to be snaring squirrels, of course, since these were King Swithbert's woods, or maybe King Beaufort's-it was hard to tell where the boundaries between the two kingdoms lay-but who was going to miss a few squirrels when there were so many? Well, the other squirrels, maybe, but he didn't let himself think about that. Hayes Centaur, King Swithbert's gamekeeper, was conscientious (unlike King Beaufort's more laid-back Claypool Sasquatch) and would love nothing better than to catch Edric poaching a squirrel, but even he couldn't keep count of all the squirrels, or tell which were Swithbert's and which were Beaufort's.
Ed pushed his way between the dogs, who were quivering so hard that they sent up a faint hum. He extended the collapsible telescope and poked it gingerly into the bushes. "Hello?" he said tentatively.
"Hello," came a small voice.
Edric and the dogs jumped in unison.
"Who's in there?" Ed demanded gruffly, hoping he sounded seven feet tall instead of his actual three feet, four inches.
"Me," came the small voice. And a handsome little boy with big brown eyes and tousled brown hair-a few leaves clinging haphazardly to it-stuck his head out of the bushes. "Will those dogs eat me?" he asked solemnly.
Edric was so relieved, his knees went weak. "Naw," he said. "This one"-he put his hand on Beelzebub's shaggy neck and felt the dog's shivers of terror-"is a coward who hides behind his big bark. And this one"-he scratched Hecate's ears-"is a show-off who just wants to be the center of attention." Cate wagged her plumy tail vigorously and grinned.
"Who are you?" the boy asked, crawling farther out of the bushes.
"Edric's my name. But mostly I'm called Ed. And who are you?"
"Christian," the boy said. "I'm six."
"Well, come out of there, Christian, and tell me what you're doing here."
Christian crawled all the way out from the bushes and stood up. "I'm almost as big as you," he said, surprised.
Ed pulled himself to his full height. "I'm tall for a troll," he said defensively.
"I've never met a troll before," Christian said.
Ed stuck out his hand and shook Christian's. "Now you have. And what about you?"
"I'm a boy," Christian said seriously. "Can't you tell?"
"Well, sure. I know you're a boy. What I want to know is, where are your folks? It's almost dark out here."
"I don't know where they are now. They looked for me for a long time, but their voices got farther and farther away until I couldn't hear them at all."
"You mean you were hiding from them?" Ed asked. "Why?"
"I don't want to live with them anymore. It's too hard."
"So you thought you'd live in the forest? Do you have any idea how hard that would be for somebody wearing a...a...What is that? A velvet suit?"
"What should I wear instead?"
"What I mean is, somebody like you doesn't know anything about living in a forest. That cup of tea is definitely not down your alley, if you know what I mean. What would you do for shelter? Food? Heat? Protection?"
"I was going to live in that bush." Christian gestured. "It has berries on it."
Ed rolled his eyes. "I can see I'm beating my head against a dead horse. There are berries now because it's summer. There won't be any in a few more weeks." He considered for about half a second and then said, "You'd better come home with me. I can take you back to your folks in the morning."
Christian's lower lip came out. "I'll go with you now, but I won't go home in the morning. I don't even know where home is."
Ed put his hand on Christian's shoulder. "Let's get out of here. It'll be pitch-dark in a few minutes, and I don't want to run into any more surprises. We can finish this conversation once we're inside. Come on, Bub. Get going, Cate. Let's get this show on the ball."
Cate scampered ahead, throwing herself into her performance as a courageous guide dog. Bub, sticking close to Ed, could feel a sick headache coming on-he always got one after he'd had to be brave-and he could hardly wait to flop down in front of the fire and pull himself together.
"What's that shiny blue stuff up there?" Christian asked after they'd wound along narrow rutted paths for a while, doing their bests not to run into any trees, fall in any streams, or become supper for anything else wandering around out there.
"Where?" Ed asked. "Oh, yeah. Great! That's the cave. We're almost home." The dogs ran ahead and disappeared into the shadows.
"You live in a cave?" Christian asked. "Why is it blue?"
"It's blue, and red, and green, and pink, and purple, and yellow, too," Ed said. "It's a big cave with lots of rooms, and in each room the walls and ceilings are studded with a different kind of crystal. I don't know how, but they glow in the dark. Kind of pretty, don't you think?"
"Yeah," Christian breathed as they approached. "It looks like magic."
"Well, maybe it is. I don't know of another cave like it. When I discovered it, the entrance was all blocked by rocks and dirt. I was sick of being a nomad and knew I'd finally found my home. Trolls have to spend at least one hundred years of their lives in a cave; did you know that? It's a tradition. I've been here, oh, must be one hundred and seventeen years now."
In the large yellow-crystal room that Ed used for his main parlor, he built up the fire, stumbling repeatedly over Bub, who was laid out in front of it like a hearth rug, breathing deeply in relief at being safe at home.
For supper there was leftover raccoon ragout, seasoned with wild garlic, onion, parsley, sage, rosemary, and thyme. There were acorn-meal biscuits and new strawberries and the wine Ed had found that day. When it was all gone, Ed let out a satisfied burp.
Christian imitated him and giggled. "If I did that at home, I'd be sent to my room," he said. "Actually, I'd be dragged off to my room, probably by my ear."
A bit drastic for a burp, Ed thought, but maybe he'd lived in a cave for so long he'd lost whatever social graces he might once have had.
"And you can forget about taking me back there," Christian went on. "I'm tired of being told what to do, and of being too clean, and of not being able to make a mess. Inventing is messy, and that's what I like to do. My parents will be glad I'm gone."
"I thought they searched for you all afternoon."
"Oh, they'll forget about me pretty soon. They have lots of other kids," Christian said. "Father never listens to me. And Mother only cares about how clean I am-and I'm never clean enough. The rest of the time she just wants to play bezique and piquet with her lady friends."
Ed could see there was no point in arguing with this kid. He figured he could manage to put up with the little squirt for one night and then he'd track down the parents and hand him over. "Come on," he said. "It's late. You can wear this for a nightshirt." He handed the boy a shirt of thin cambric that he had found beside a pond. Well, he had to admit he could see the owner of the shirt splashing in the pond, but he'd left him his boots and his breeches, hadn't he? What else did a body need to get home in on a warm summer day?
Ed made a bed for Christian out of furs in the dark-blue-crystal room. Sleeping in there was like sleeping up in the night sky with the glitter of stardust all around you. The little boy looked quite happy bedded down in the furs, the sleeves of his nightshirt rolled up four and a half times. As soon as he put his head down, both dogs came padding in to flop on either side of him.
With an arm around each furry neck, he murmured sleepily, "You can throw that stupid velvet suit away. I'm never wearing it again." Then his eyes closed, and three sets of soft snores rose to the shining ceiling.
"Who does he think he is?" Ed muttered, picking up the trail of discarded clothing as he went back to the fire in the yellow-crystal room. "Imperious little son of a gun, acting like some big cheese in a small pond, expecting me to pick up after him like I was his servant."
He dropped the clothing in front of the fire and sat on the picnic rug he'd found years before, way over on King Beaufort's side of the forest. It was a picnic that had been interrupted suddenly; he could tell that much from the scattered plates and utensils and food. Not that there was much food left. Whatever animal had come upon the picnickers had enjoyed the meal more than they had. But Ed had enjoyed the kitchenware, the hamper, the big napkins embroidered with the letter B, and the rug, all of which he'd hauled home.
He shook out each small item of clothing and dusted it off. As he folded the velvet shorts, he heard a faint tinkle. In the pocket he found a gold chain with a golden charm hanging from it. The charm was in the shape of a bird unlike any Ed had ever seen in the forest, though that certainly didn't mean it didn't exist. The world was full of fantastical creatures. The bird seemed to be part pheasant and part eagle.
Ed returned the chain to the pocket. Under other circumstances he would have added it to his collection, but he had a feeling the kid's parents would notice if it was missing. Then he wrapped the stack of clothing in one of the big picnic napkins, stashed the bundle in the hamper, and settled down with his briar pipe and the book of Greek myths. Nothing like a little fratricide, patricide, matricide, and infanticide to send a fellow right off to sleep.

Copyright © 2002 by Jean Ferris

All rights reserved.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 162 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(128)

4 Star

(23)

3 Star

(8)

2 Star

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 162 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 14, 2009

    okay.

    I thought that this book was an okay read, kind of like a rainy day book. It was cute, sweet, with just a little bit of humor, but it just wasn't the right book for me. It's about seventeen year old Christian, who runs away from his family at six years old because he 'doesn't want to live with them anymore because there's too many rules'. He's found by a troll living in a cave, Ed, who raises him. Christian's cave home is across the river from a castle, where he finds the princess Marigold. They become fast friends through mail sent by pidgeons, and when Christian takes a job at the castle he finally meets her and falls in love with her. It's a little bit more complicated, but I don't want to give away the ending for anyone who hasn't read it.

    21 out of 28 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 18, 2012

    Ha ha

    This book is so funny and entertaining! Its a cool and fun fantasy twist and involves many interesting characters. I especially loved all of Ed's messed-up sayings.

    16 out of 20 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 22, 2006

    O.M.G.!!!

    all i have to say about this book is... O.M.G.!!! it has a bit of romance, suspense, and mystery in this book. i am so impressed with this book. i first picked it up when i was about 8-years-old over the summer... i read it then and loved it!!! since then (about 6 years have passed), i read this book 4 times and i am reading it now (which is my 5th time) i basically read this book whenever i need a romance story and forget what happens in the story when i'm not in the middle of reading another book. when i was 8, i picked up this book and thought it looked kind of weird and didn't understand totally what it is supposed to be about... i was soo wrong! i started reading it and once christian and marigold started their first conversation through writing, i was soo hooked!!! when i first read this book, i finsihed it in less than 1 week! i couldn't believe it and couldn't put it down... even then! i was SO dissapointed when i was reading and looked at the clock when it said 11 pm or later... i wasn't even tired, but knew i had to go to bed then! trust me... if you read this amazing book, you wont regret it!!!

    16 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2012

    :)

    I lovvvved it its really romantic with a twist all in the background. I fell in love with this book and i hope u love it if u get it. It rocks and get twice upon a marigold. Two awesome books!

    8 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 25, 2011

    Love love love it

    I love this book its the best ever!

    7 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2012

    Awesome book

    When Marigold healed Christian I was so excited to keep reading on, I was also happy when Olyimpia fell of that deck thing I was so surprised when I found out that Olympia was not their real mother I cant wait to read Twice Upon a Maeigold I love this book I so want to read it again I think that the auther did a great job on swriting the book

    6 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2012

    Best Book EVER!!!!

    This is the best book in the whole world! Everyone needs to read it! :D I must admit I'm in love!

    6 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2012

    Awesome!!!!!!!!!!

    I love this book and it is HILARIOUS!!!!

    5 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 31, 2012

    Once upon a marigold!

    This is an awesome book and one of my favorites!

    4 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 30, 2009

    Left Hanging

    Can hardly wait until we get to the library to get the sequel to this book.

    3 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2013

    Great Read

    I recomend this book to anyone who likes a good fairy tale love story.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2013

    Fairly Amazing

    This book is a new fairy tale with a fairly standard storyline. A boy falls in love with a princess. But don't pay attention to the mushy gushy or the standard. Pay attention instead to the ridiculous humor(p mail, or mail by pigeons) And dont miss the twists and turns, such as a kidnapped king, and a wedding rigged for a certain evil someone to rule. Sprinklings of danger, humor, and everything-but-the-kitchen sink make this a must read. Dont miss books 2 and 3.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2006

    Interesting

    The book was good, it kind of dragged on though. I liked all of it except the troll, fairy etc. part of it, that was juvenile, but it did make the book more interesting.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 1, 2014

    So funny

    Favorite book and so funny

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2014

    I love this

    I read this book and i loved it so much!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 15, 2014

    A great read!

    I loved the storyline and plot! Caught my attention immediately and I loved it from start to finish!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2013

    Lisa to katrina

    So sorry i didnt get bak to u its just that i was busy but now i can checkup any time so ill get bak to u anytime sooner than usual. What i mean is that well... i was soo super busy with everything. But whatever i just will u know respond way faster. So hi im a fifteen yr old grl wbu?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2013

    Katrina

    Im 14 and obviously a girl xD

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 4, 2013

    Cmon peeples

    Chat here any time leave messages for me here and ill respond to them when i can.. make your headline 'To Lisa' thankx lol

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2013

    ;)

    Read this in grade 4. It was

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 162 Customer Reviews

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