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Once We Were Human
     

Once We Were Human

5.0 1
by Randall Allen Farmer
 

The Commander (Book One)

Carol Hancock, wife, mother, pillar of the community and faithful member of her church, never expected to contract Transform Sickness. Certainly she never expected to make that rarest of transformations, the female predator transformation. Now she was trapped in the custody of doctors working to research a cure for Transform Sickness

Overview

The Commander (Book One)

Carol Hancock, wife, mother, pillar of the community and faithful member of her church, never expected to contract Transform Sickness. Certainly she never expected to make that rarest of transformations, the female predator transformation. Now she was trapped in the custody of doctors working to research a cure for Transform Sickness while her body changed underneath her, becoming stronger, faster, with more acute senses, resistance to poisons, and more able to heal. Her mind changed underneath her, with new tempers, more aggression, violent mood swings and new hungers. She had new enemies, many of whom wanted to kill her for what she’d become, and more who wanted to use her as a tool. And she was dying, like all the other previous female predators in America except one, and that one had become a psychotic serial killer. She must figure out a way to survive her transformation and her enemies, preferably without becoming a psychotic serial killer herself.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940032846710
Publisher:
Randall Allen Farmer
Publication date:
11/04/2011
Series:
Commander , #1
Sold by:
Smashwords
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
320,451
File size:
436 KB

Meet the Author

Greetings. I am an author, science nerd, an amateur photographer, a father, and a pencil and paper game designer and gamemaster. My formal education was in geology and geophysics, and back in the day I worked in the oil industry tweaking software associated with finding oil. Since I left the oil industry, I've spent most of my time being a parent, but did have enough time to get two short stories published (in Analog and Marion Zimmer Bradley's Fantasy Magazine). Now I'm giving epublishing a try, and I have an ample supply of novel-length publishable material to polish and publish.

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Once We Were Human 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
"When I screamed myself awake, nothing had changed. Metal cot. Straitjacket. Legs shackled together. A single tiny light bulb on the ceiling, behind a metal cage, bright enough to hurt my eyes." Farmer, Randall (2011-11-09). Once We Were Human (The Commander) (Kindle Locations 39-41). MajorTransform Unlimited. Kindle Edition. For me this is where the book begins. There is some preface and it does have relevance. But, as a reader the line above is where the story grabbed hold of me and began to draw me in. There seems to be some discussion about genre- I have no qualms with calling this Science Fiction. There were many similarities that I could draw between this and the Novel Darwin's Radio. And for anyone who liked that book this book will be a satisfying read to you. For those who felt as I did that Darwin's Radio had a tendency to dwell too much on the stale scientific end of things ;then this book will not disappoint you. There are some similarities- but mostly about the conjecture that there is some disease involved in what is happening. This book is what I would term an Alternate Universe story - the story takes place in the 1960s. And in many places there are hints at speculation that what is happening may have happened one or more times in the past. This might create a feeling that its dwelling on myth and fantasy, but I believe as with other books like this it still stand strongly in the category of Alternate Universe Science Fiction. I'm not sure that it needed to be in the 60s, but it was a good place for these characters to be coming from. In this story the reluctant Heroine is thrust into a nightmare that she would only relegate to what in her mind was the worst of sinners and criminals. She has to face her own prejudice and self loathing in order to cope with what she's become. And all around her are the barriers and abutments of a society that is living in fear of what she and others like her represent. Randall Farmer takes us into our own paranoid 60s and creates some believable characters who are all working sometimes at odds with each other to try to contain something they can't begin to understand. It's been a while since someone has written a novel that has kept me as engrossed in the story and immersed in the characters. This was both a thoughtful and fun read that I had difficulty putting down. There's a lot of room left for the next story in the series. I shall move to that after I catch my breath.