×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

One D.O.A., One on the Way
     

One D.O.A., One on the Way

3.8 5
by Mary Robison
 

See All Formats & Editions


One D.O.A., One on the Way is a novel which opens on Jay, a location scout for a movie production company. She is complacently married to Alt, who has just been diagnosed with a grave illness and gone back to his palatial family home, back to the care of his parents. Which is just fine with Jay—or so she tells herself at the start. But standing left of

Overview


One D.O.A., One on the Way is a novel which opens on Jay, a location scout for a movie production company. She is complacently married to Alt, who has just been diagnosed with a grave illness and gone back to his palatial family home, back to the care of his parents. Which is just fine with Jay—or so she tells herself at the start. But standing left of center in this still-prosperous but mortally wounded family does not get easier as the weeks wear on. As she tries to negotiate her way around the anger of Saunders, Alt’s despised twin brother; maintain her friendship with Petal, his beautiful wife; and protect what’s left of the innocence of Collie, the niece caught in the middle, Jay finds more than the Louisiana heat oppressive.
With her trademark biting humor and breathtaking facility with minimalist language, Mary Robison, author of the award-winning Why Did I Ever, sets the stage for a beguiling Southern Gothic sure to delight her fanatical following and new readers alike.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Robison’s minimalism is more like a slap in the face: it’s short, it stings, and you wonder who in tarnation did that to you . . . One D.O.A., One on the Way has all the razored style and zigzag tone one expects, but also a new connection to a bigger world, in which all of our circumstances are as desperate and hilarious as her characters’ . . . Mary Robison’s work has always felt like a glorious amenity, but One D.O.A., One on the Way is a powerful necessity.” —The New York Times

“Robison could work for a food or drug packager: she squeezes dire warnings into tiny spaces . . . [One D.O.A., One on the Way] can be read in half an afternoon, leaving plenty of room for afterthoughts about Robison’s funny and heartbreaking conversations.” —The New Yorker

“Mary Robison is a woman of few words. But what powerful words they are . . . Pushcart Prize and O. Henry Award-winner Robison’s searing novella is rendered in edgy vignettes . . . Robison is a master at delivering dark scenarios with mordant wit. One D.O.A., One on the Way is an impressive addition to her ouvre, by turns horrifying, comic, shocking, and wise.” —The San Diego Union-Tribune

“Robison’s spare, hilarious dialogue and collection of fragmented images, moments and excerpts call on readers to fill in blanks and to organize what looks at first glance like chaos glimpsed from a moving car . . . a vivid, witty ride.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Robison eloquently reveals the dissolution of a family . . . The southern novel’s bread and butter are rich descriptions, thick as humidity and Spanish moss.” —Booklist

“With a laconic voice and a despairing sense of humor, film location scout Eve Broussard narrates award-winning Robison’s grim yet witty novella about the dissoulution of a family and a city in the wake of Hurricane Katrina . . . Robison’s narrative is jumpy but effective, interspersed with and informed by startling statistics.” —Publishers Weekly

Daniel Handler
The novel's see-sawing between laughter and despair captures the hysteria of the moment and the schizophrenia of the times, but also finds an under­current of optimism, buried deep but rising strong, that carries Eve and the reader forward…Mary Robison's work has always felt like a glorious amenity, but One D.O.A., One on the Way is a powerful necessity.
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly

With a laconic voice and a despairing sense of humor, film location scout Eve Broussard narrates award-winning Robison's (Why Did I Ever) grim yet witty novella about the dissolution of a family and a city in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. Eve and unstable-but-armed Petal are married to 42-year-old twins, Adam and Saunders, who-not unlike the two black swans forever circling the statue commemorating their sister's suicide-spin their nearly identical lives aimlessly: drinking, fretting over hepatitis C and hording cocaine in their parents' stately New Orleans mansion. This family's Big Easy is a world where lush excess and harsh deprivation work side-by-side to create a malaise sinister in its paralyzing appeal. Told in terse, numbered passages, Robison's narrative is jumpy but effective, interspersed with and informed by startling statistics ("More than 50 former NOPD officers are in prison, 2 on death row"). Distilled episodes of mistaken identity, marriage trouble and potential infidelity build to a crucial decision for Eve, who may be damned if she does, damned if she doesn't. (Mar.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Kirkus Reviews
Postmodern, post-Katrina picaresque from Robison (Tell Me, 2002, etc.). Eve works as a location scout, desperately trying to drum up film-industry work in a New Orleans still physically and economically ravaged by the hurricane. Deeply affected by the abject squalor and the scale of ruin, she sees these cruel absurdities from a position of privilege, having married into money. Her third husband, Adam, suffers from hepatitis C and has dysfunctional relatives, including his alcoholic twin, Saunders, his overbearing parents and a sister-in-law who pulls a gun on Saunders and is soon institutionalized. The clan's dark scandal concerns a daughter drowned in the family pond, now home to a spooky statue and two black swans. Like the post-Katrina landscape, the story is littered with found objects: interspersed news clippings on various subjects, including gun holsters; health-department, law-enforcement and FEMA statistics; personal and funny lists of missing items; Eve's notes to herself ("I'm through reading lengthy bits of scripture into the answering machines of my enemies"). Hindered by guilt and latent anger, Eve also boasts an inability to keep her mouth shut that comes close to scuttling her attempts to sell the city as a location to a detestable film producer. As she struggles with Adam's illness and her affair with his twin, she diverts herself with alcohol and pot, drives around New Orleans and environs dispensing witticisms to her film-biz protege Lucien. Robison's spare, hilarious dialogue and collection of fragmented images, moments and excerpts call on readers to fill in blanks and to organize what looks at first glance like chaos glimpsed from a moving car. The ending is a bit ofa cop-out, but a vivid, witty ride precedes it.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781582435619
Publisher:
Counterpoint Press
Publication date:
02/16/2010
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
176
Sales rank:
1,373,740
Product dimensions:
5.25(w) x 7.50(h) x (d)

Meet the Author


Mary Robison is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, two Pushcart Prizes, an O. Henry Award, and the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Fiction. She is the author of three previous novels, Oh! (1981), Subtraction (1991), and Why Did I Ever (2001), and of four story collections, Days (1979), An Amateur's Guide to the Night (1983), Believe Them (1988), and Tell Me (2002). Robison has written for Hollywood and has been a contributor to the New Yorker since 1977.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

One D.O.A., One on the Way 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thank you!!! Yay Kristina! Keep going!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Love it, but I just gotta say. 'Que' is spelled cue.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sorry, it's late...almost midnight, but it's here ^_^ <p> Everything started moving in no time. It was like time stopped so he could spit that word at me. I stumble backwards a bit. Devirex gives me the creepiest smile I have ever seen. <br> "Anything wrong?" He asks, as if daring me to say something. I open my mouth and then shut it quickly. I had nothing to say. Nothing at all. Devirex looks at Marina. "Let's go talk...somewhere else." He suggests, putting his hand on the small of her back. They go up the stairs like that. When Devirex is out of sight Tobin looks around confusedm <br> "Where'd Marina go?" He asks me. I look at him. <br> "She just went upstairs...with Devirex." I tell him, how could he not remember the man we met, especially we had just seen him. <br> "Who? You know, it doesn't matter. Arami, you should go talk to people. Have some fun." He winks and I make a face, but go into the huge ballroom. I run into a woman. She looks at me and grins widely. <br> "Arami! You have no idea hoe great it is to see you. I have been looking everywhere. I can't believe you could just sneak up on me like that. Funny, right?" She says. I look at her. <br> "Sorry, but I don't think I know you..." I say and she nods slowly. <br> "Oh, yeah. I'm Katrina. I'm with the DOA. New recruit. And now I get to watch over you." She smiles and pokes my nose on you. I nid and wave at her, walking towards another person. The music starts playing and it is really slow ballroom dancing music. I feel very awkward. I don't know how to dance, much less ballroom dance. I also feel like everyone is under-dressed for this music. I watch as people start pairing up and dancing around. Katrina has disappeared. I look around for her and someone takes one of my hands. I jump and smack the person who had my hand. I look at the face and see it's Tobin. My face heats up quickly. <br> "Whoa, killer." Tobin chuckles. "I was just going to see if you wanted to dance. You looked rather lonely." He says. <br> "Sorry...and I can't dance." I mumble. He smiles and takes my hand again. <br> "Then this is the perfect opportunity to learn." He grins and puts one hand on my waist, and take the other and links it with one of my hands. I put my other han on his shoulder. He starts slowly talking me through it. Back, Left, Forward, Right. I repeat that in my head as we dance to the song. I lose myself in my footsteps, and don't even realize when the end of the song comes. Tobin lets me go and I look up. Katrina is back, and she is staring right at me. <br> "I think I need to...yeah...so...bye." I tell Tobin and walk over to Katrina. "You're staring." I tell her. She nods. <br> "I just recieved word that there is a Fallen in here. He is looking for you. Fallen can do dangerous things Arami. You need to stay away from anyone suspicious. Tell your family too." She says. I nod slowy and turn to walk off when I think of something. <br> "Katrina, could a Fallen cause amnesia in humans?" I whisper humans quietly. She nods. "Can they stop time?" I ask, feeling my eyes getting wider. <br> "Only the very powerful ones can. And they must draw a lot of power if they want to do it for a while." She explains to me. <br> "Katrina I think I saw a Fallen." I swallow hard. <br> "Where?" She asks, looking around. My breath starts becoming shallower. <br> "He went up the stairs." I say and shiver, suddenly getting cold. "With Marina." I add. And as if on quoue, there was a high-pitch scream from upstairs
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of the worst books ever. It was actually painful to read. How did it ever get published?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago