One-Eye! Two-Eyes! Three-Eyes!: A Very Grimm Fairy Tale

One-Eye! Two-Eyes! Three-Eyes!: A Very Grimm Fairy Tale

by Aaron Shepard, Gary Clement
     
 

This is Two-Eyes.

She has two wicked sisters.

They make fun of her for having only two eyes and wonder why she can't look normal like they do.

But Two-Eyes will show them.

She's got a fairy godmother, a magic goat, and a handsome knight to help her outsmart her terrible sisters and escape far, far away.

With a spirited text that's fun to read

…  See more details below

Overview

This is Two-Eyes.

She has two wicked sisters.

They make fun of her for having only two eyes and wonder why she can't look normal like they do.

But Two-Eyes will show them.

She's got a fairy godmother, a magic goat, and a handsome knight to help her outsmart her terrible sisters and escape far, far away.

With a spirited text that's fun to read out loud and humorous illustrations, this retelling of a Brothers Grimm tale is sure to become a new folk classic.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Shepherd's (The Princess Mouse) modern-day fairytale-part Cinderella, part Brothers Grimm-pokes fun at those stories in this retelling of a seemingly average girl who is chastised by her "ordinary" one- and three-eyed sisters for having two eyes and being "different." Clement's (The Great Poochini) in-your-face illustrations populated with people in photographs, newscasters on television and heroes on book covers-all featuring anything but two eyes-further exaggerate this prejudice. Tired of being forced to eat microwaved leftovers, Two-Eyes sets out to walk her two-eyed goat when she stumbles upon a godmother-like figure who teaches her a magical rhyme. Suddenly, the otherwise disinterested One-Eye and Three-Eyes make it their business to find out what their sister is up to. The story line follows a predictable course right up to the end, featuring a knight (with two eyes) in shining armor who garners the attention of the two sisters as they compete for his affection. Much like the glass slipper that sealed Cinderella's fate, the aforementioned rhyme secures a place for Two-Eyes in the heart of the knight and ensures a happy ending for... well, almost everyone. Shepherd one-ups the classic fairytale by giving the cruel sisters their just deserts, and proves that updating a classic can be a treat for a new generation of readers. Ages 5-8. (Dec.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal

K-Gr 3
In the Grimm folktale, little Two-Eyes is despised by her family because she is common and sees as ordinary humans do. In Shepard's retelling, sisters One-Eye and Three-Eyes mistreat their youngest sibling because, having seen no one else, they believe her to be "different." Two-Eyes goes off to tend the goat, weeping because she's hungry. A fairy appears and tells her a magic spell that makes the goat provide food. In Grimm, as in Eric Kimmel's One Eye, Two Eyes, Three Eyes (Holiday House, 1996), the goat is butchered after the sisters discover Two-Eyes's good fortune, whereas Shepard has them simply chasing the animal away. Instead of the fairy telling the girl to plant the goat's entrails, Shepard has her planting an ordinary seed. A tree with golden apples grows, and, because only Two-Eyes can pluck the fruit, she eventually marries the prince who asks for an apple. The alterations to the story are consistent with the lighthearted watercolor-and-pencil illustrations, which feature Two-Eyes microwaving her meager leftovers and One-Eye reading "Eye Claudius " while Three-Eyes peruses one book with one eye and a different volume with the other two. Children will enjoy the humor in this reincarnation, and it will make excellent fodder for reader's theater, with a script available on the author's Web site.
—Grace OliffCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
Two-Eyes lives with her two elder sisters, One-Eye and Three-Eyes, who make fun of her for not looking normal like they do. Like Cinderella, Two-Eyes does all the work around the house for unappetizing leftovers, while her siblings eat lavishly and live a life of leisure. One day, while Two-Eyes is taking the family goat out for a graze, a strange old woman appears out of nowhere with a basketful of magical secrets. She teaches Two-Eyes a chant to summon scrumptious food, but the mean sisters become suspicious and follow her. A cat-and-mouse game ensues, with Two-Eyes helped by the old woman, a talking stream and a very clever tree. In the end, a handsome knight on a purple horse whisks her off to his castle, which is full of two-eyed people. Clement's quirky watercolors suit the fractured fairytale, adapted from a Brothers Grimm original. Wry fun for the early grades. (Picture book. 6-8)

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689867408
Publisher:
Atheneum Books for Young Readers
Publication date:
12/26/2006
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.30(w) x 10.30(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Aaron Shepard has been fascinated by this story since childhood. He is the author of many folktales, including The Sea King's Daughter: A Russian Legend, The Baker's Dozen: A Saint Nicholas Tale, The Maiden of Northland: A Hero Tale of Finland, and most recently, The Princess Mouse: A Tale of Finland. He lives in the Los Angeles area.

Gary Clement, who also has only two eyes, is the winner of the Canadian Governor General's Literary Award for The Great Poochini. He lives in Toronto, Canada.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >