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One-Eyed Giant and Other Monsters from the Greek Myths
     

One-Eyed Giant and Other Monsters from the Greek Myths

by Anne F. Rockwell
 

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Monsters have played an important role in the myths of all cultures. 'Everywhere in the world people have imagined monsters, made up stories about them, and tried, in art, to show us what they looked like, ' Anne Rockwell writes in her Author's Note.

Overview

Monsters have played an important role in the myths of all cultures. 'Everywhere in the world people have imagined monsters, made up stories about them, and tried, in art, to show us what they looked like, ' Anne Rockwell writes in her Author's Note.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Uma Krishnaswami
With economy of phrase, and playful and appropriately horrific illustrations, Rockwell retells ten well-known tales about monsters from Greek mythology. Medusa and the Cyclops are here; so are the Hydra and the Minotaur, and Scylla and Charybdis. Each story is short and eminently readable. Note, however, that Rockwell does not water down these tales to soothe the sensibilities of parents concerning violence. The myths carry all their original punch. In this reviewer's opinion, that's as it should be. Source note, pronunciation guide, and an author's preface are provided.
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 1-3With descriptive yet concise language, each one- or two-page retelling of the 10 myths in this collection captures the spirit of the tale. The author's respect for children and affection for her topic is apparent from carefully crafted text. On Typhon: "He could imitate the sound of any beast. The spread of his wings darkened the earth...He was married to the terrible snake-woman, Echidna, who ate men raw. The two of them were the proud parents of a hundred terrible monsters." The full-color illustrations, line drawings silk screened in gold ink and hand-colored with watercolors, reflect classical inspiration, but are vivid and pronounced in childlike, nearly cartoon simplicity. Text pages are set off with attractive Greek-scrolled borders. This book complements Rockwell's Robber Baby (Greenwillow, 1994) with the addition of some of the less familiar characters, including the Hydra, the Cyclopes, the Graiae, Medusa, and the Minotaur. It will be a satisfying read-aloud for families as well as a welcome classroom addition.Carolyn Noah, Central Mass. Regional Library System, Worcester, MA
Hazel Rochman
As in her popular collection "The Robber Baby" (1994), Rockwell retells and illustrates Greek myths for young listeners. The old monster stories are as contemporary as today's nightmares. With a simple text and dramatic, full-page watercolor paintings, she brings young listeners scary fun without being too gruesome. Kids will recognize the ghostly Empusae "spooks" that moan and wail to frighten nighttime travelers. The full-page picture of the Medusa makes the monster as much clown as ogre, with her tongue stuck out and her teeth like tusks. The sleeping Minotaur is easy prey for brave young Theseus. More frightening are the three Graiae sisters who always stay together because they have only one eye and one tooth to share among the three of them. Some of the pictures and stories are confusing with too much crowded in, but the best of them are weird and fearful, great for sharing and reading aloud. The Medusa story ends with words that leave you shivering: "And no one ever went to that desert again. No one."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688138103
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/01/1996
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.36(w) x 12.21(h) x 0.41(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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