Overview

One foot, two feet One mouse, three mice One goose, four geese

In this clever counting book, die-cut windows frame a single object and a turn of the page reveals a group. Featuring familiar objects and funny artwork, this inventive concept book is a great introduction to both counting and common irregular plural nouns.

A cumulative row of illustrations along the bottom of ...
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Overview

One foot, two feet One mouse, three mice One goose, four geese

In this clever counting book, die-cut windows frame a single object and a turn of the page reveals a group. Featuring familiar objects and funny artwork, this inventive concept book is a great introduction to both counting and common irregular plural nouns.

A cumulative row of illustrations along the bottom of the pages shows all of the previous objects in order, so kids can keep track of where they are, and the book also contains a fun hide-and-seek game, inviting kids to spy a little airplane zooming through each spread.
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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
K-Gr 1—This simple yet delightful counting book emphasizes the quirks of the English language, where the plural of a noun is not always formed by merely adding the letter "s." It begins with a single, cartoon-style "foot" that is framed in a sturdy, die-cut opening on a glossy red page. Turning the page reveals two "feet." "One Mouse" in a bold blue frame follows, with the page-turn revealing "Three Mice." Children can anticipate the plural noun that will come next after naming or reading the picture in the window. Observant youngsters will spot a tiny airplane flying from spread to spread, catching the eye of a character or becoming entangled in some illustration. In addition, a small line from one to 10 summarizes the objects that have previously appeared. The designated numeral is also cleverly hidden within each crisp acrylic and ink drawing. The large font will aid pre-readers as well as ESL students as they pore over details again and again. An exceptional counting book, indeed.—Blair Christolon, Prince William Public Library System, Manassas, VA
School Library Journal
K-Gr 1—This simple yet delightful counting book emphasizes the quirks of the English language, where the plural of a noun is not always formed by merely adding the letter "s." It begins with a single, cartoon-style "foot" that is framed in a sturdy, die-cut opening on a glossy red page. Turning the page reveals two "feet." "One Mouse" in a bold blue frame follows, with the page-turn revealing "Three Mice." Children can anticipate the plural noun that will come next after naming or reading the picture in the window. Observant youngsters will spot a tiny airplane flying from spread to spread, catching the eye of a character or becoming entangled in some illustration. In addition, a small line from one to 10 summarizes the objects that have previously appeared. The designated numeral is also cleverly hidden within each crisp acrylic and ink drawing. The large font will aid pre-readers as well as ESL students as they pore over details again and again. An exceptional counting book, indeed.—Blair Christolon, Prince William Public Library System, Manassas, VA
Kirkus Reviews

American English, as a language, has much to answer for, not least being irregular plural nouns—foot, feet; mouse, mice; goose, geese—but this cut-above counting book explicates them by wedding the numbers two to ten to plurals while the number one introduces the singular of each.

It is a clever conception—akin to the work of Laura Vaccaro Seeger—and executed with an elegant design. A die-cut window displays one of the group that will be discovered on the subsequent page: one snowman, five snowmen; one die, six dice; one ox, seven oxen. In each group illustration, the appropriate numeral is worked into the art (a coal-button 5 on the front of one of the snowmen; an 8-ball tattoo on one of the octopi). The illustrations are as deceptively simple as Thomas the Tank Engine and as elemental in their engagement. Maloney and Zekauskas add little touches—a small plane scooting by on each page, amusing asides within the artwork, a cumulative gathering of what went before on the verso of the die-cut page that serve as a reminder of the progression of numbers—to further beguile young readers.

A classy, well-turned piece of work. (Picture book. 3-5)

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781101643372
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA)
  • Publication date: 5/12/2011
  • Sold by: Penguin Group
  • Format: NOOK Kids
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 1,185,969
  • Age range: 3 - 5 Years
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

Peter Maloney spent most of his childhood playing in the woods behind the house he grew up in in Cedar Grove, New Jersey. He wrote his first book, a 165-page novel called Journey Under The Pacific Ocean, when he was eleven years old.



After graduating from Rutgers College, Peter took courses in illustration and design at the School of Visual Arts in New York. He began submitting children's picture books to publishing houses. They were all rejected. At the same time he worked at an advertising agency in New York City creating
ads, jingles and tv commercials including the original Milk Moustache campaign for Dellwood Milk. Around this time he also met a young college graduate named Felicia Zekauskas. During their very first conversation he discovered she also shared the dream of writing and illustrating children's
books.



Peter and Felicia then went into business together. They started a graphic design and advertising company called Zinc. In their spare time, they began collaborating on picture books. Their first book, Redbird at Rockefeller Center, is the story of a baby redbird stranded atop the world's most famous Christmas tree. Their second book, The Magic Hockey Stick, is based on what happened to them after they won Wayne Gretzky's hockey stick at a charity auction at Madison Square Garden.



In addition to sports stars, Peter's heroes have always included writers, artists and songwriters. As a boy he loved reading books by Jules Verne, Edgar Rice Burroughs, J.R.R. Tolkien and Kenneth Robeson. His favorite songwriters are Joni Mitchell, Ray Davies and Cole Porter and his favorite
illustrators include William Steig, Charles Addams, Jean Pierre Sempe and Edward Sorel.



There's nothing Peter would rather do than write and illustrate picture
books, although he would also like to be a famous rock star.



Peter now lives on the 37th floor of a skyscraper in downtown Manhattan. From
his window, he can still see the distant woods he played in as a child.



copyright © 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.
Peter Maloney spent most of his childhood playing in the woods behind the house he grew up in in Cedar Grove, New Jersey. He wrote his first book, a 165-page novel called Journey Under The Pacific Ocean, when he was eleven years old.



After graduating from Rutgers College, Peter took courses in illustration and design at the School of Visual Arts in New York. He began submitting children's picture books to publishing houses. They were all rejected. At the same time he worked at an advertising agency in New York City creating
ads, jingles and tv commercials including the original Milk Moustache campaign for Dellwood Milk. Around this time he also met a young college graduate named Felicia Zekauskas. During their very first conversation he discovered she also shared the dream of writing and illustrating children's
books.



Peter and Felicia then went into business together. They started a graphic design and advertising company called Zinc. In their spare time, they began collaborating on picture books. Their first book, Redbird at Rockefeller Center, is the story of a baby redbird stranded atop the world's most famous Christmas tree. Their second book, The Magic Hockey Stick, is based on what happened to them after they won Wayne Gretzky's hockey stick at a charity auction at Madison Square Garden.



In addition to sports stars, Peter's heroes have always included writers, artists and songwriters. As a boy he loved reading books by Jules Verne, Edgar Rice Burroughs, J.R.R. Tolkien and Kenneth Robeson. His favorite songwriters are Joni Mitchell, Ray Davies and Cole Porter and his favorite
illustrators include William Steig, Charles Addams, Jean Pierre Sempe and Edward Sorel.



There's nothing Peter would rather do than write and illustrate picture
books, although he would also like to be a famous rock star.



Peter now lives on the 37th floor of a skyscraper in downtown Manhattan. From
his window, he can still see the distant woods he played in as a child.



copyright © 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.























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