One Lighthouse, One Moon

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Overview

Here, in one book, are the days of the week, the months of the year, the four seasons, the basic colors, and an exciting counting adventure — all conceived, staged, and presented by the incomparable Anita Lobel. You can savor each of the three stories separately or think of them as three acts in one play. However you do it, a standing ovation is guaranteed!

10 Best Illustrated Books of 2000 (NY Times Book ...

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Overview

Here, in one book, are the days of the week, the months of the year, the four seasons, the basic colors, and an exciting counting adventure — all conceived, staged, and presented by the incomparable Anita Lobel. You can savor each of the three stories separately or think of them as three acts in one play. However you do it, a standing ovation is guaranteed!

10 Best Illustrated Books of 2000 (NY Times Book Review)

01 Riverbank Review Magazine's Children's Books of Distinction Award Nominations

Presents the days of the week, the months of the year, and numbers from one to ten through the activities of a cat and people in and around a lighthouse.

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Editorial Reviews

Horn Book
“Each page is an elegantly simple, expertly crafted composition, each spread a harmonious contrast.”
Horn Book
Each page is an elegantly simple, expertly crafted composition, each spread a harmonious contrast.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Lobel (Alison's Zinnia) covers the days of the week, the months of the year and a nautical count from one to 10 ("One Lighthouse, One Moon") in this eclectic, quirky triptych of a picture book. A cat named Nini acts as the thread that ties them all together; she introduces each segment perched on an armchair, then sneaks into nearly every illustration as either an observer or a participant. In richly tinted watercolor and gouache paintings, Lobel rolls out the colors and the days of the week in a section titled "All Week Long," via the footwear of a girl who appears only from the knees down ("Black shoes on Monday. Red shoes on Tuesday" and so on). Each painting conveys details of the nameless girl's life: on Saturday she dances in pink ballet slippers; she wears white with her Sunday best. The opener for the progression of months in "Nini's Year" shows a 12-panel framed picture, each featuring a symbol associated with its month. The following pages elaborate on each ("In September Nini played in the autumn leaves. In October Nini posed on a pumpkin"); cat lovers will notice the physical change in Nini in December as she waits for "good things"--kittens (the fireplace mantle shows Christmas and Kwanza cards and a menorah). The three-pronged format is refreshingly different, and Lobel segues seamlessly from one theme to the next. Ages 4-up. (Apr.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Publishers Weekly
"Lobel covers the days of the week, the months of the year and a nautical count from one to 10 in this eclectic quirky triptych of a picture book, and segues seamlessly from one theme to the next," wrote PW. Ages 4-up. (Apr.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature - Children's Literature
Anita Lobel is always breaking ground artistically or narratively. In this three-chapter picture book, she seems to do both. Each of the three chapters, "All Week Long," "Nini's Year," and "One Lighthouse, One Moon," could stand alone as a concept book. Together, the three chapters, linked by the antics of the cat, Nini, present a slice of a young person's life. "All Week Long" features colors and days of the week; "Nini's Year" depicts the months and the seasons; and "One Lighthouse, One Moon" is a naturalist's idea of a counting book. The full-page, full-color art is striking, the cat endearing, and the concepts cleanly presented. More than an attractive teaching tool, this book is an invitation that will appeal to many readers, regardless of their personal level of accomplishment with the concepts presented. It's yet another masterpiece from the maestro. 2000, Greenwillow Books/HarperCollins Publishers, Ages 3 to 6, $15.95 and $15.89. Reviewer: Judy Katsh
School Library Journal
PreS-K-Lobel's beautiful watercolor-and-gouache paintings are the heart of this concept book, which is divided into three "chapters." The first section shows a different pair of shoes in a different color for each day of the week. The middle section introduces the months of the year via the activities and antics of a cat named Nini. The final section is a seaside counting exercise from "ONE lighthouse" to "TEN trees bent in the wind. And ONE HUNDRED stars and ONE moon lit up the sky." Although there is no story line per se, the book combines text and illustration quite successfully and really works. There is humor and repetition throughout, and Nini appears on each double-page spread even when she is not the focus of attention. The artwork provides the essential information and adds richness and texture through the use of bold colors and detailed brushwork. This is a fresh approach to the concepts covered, and has great visual appeal.-JoAnn Jonas, Carlsbad City Library, San Diego, CA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Karen Carden
Although One Lighthouse, One Moon is new this season, it's easy to imagine dog-eared copies tucked away in boxes labeld "Favorite Childhood Things."...Watercolor and gouache illustrations provide a perfect balance of coziness and exhilaration. Visual clues in these by-the-sea stories tie the tales together, and this elegant book becomes one seamless whole.
The Christian Science Monitor
Kirkus Reviews
In three short chapters of just a few words each, Lobel demonstrates her artistry for choosing the right ingredients to create a perfect concept book around the life of a small graystriped cat. "All Week Long," the first story or chapter, presents not only the days of the week, but also colors, and in the process, accomplishes a fine assessment of one little girl's activities by focusing, cat'seye view, on her footwear. Tuesday's flashy red cowboy boots take her bikeriding, and Saturday's demure pink toe shoes inspire Nini, the cat, to lift an elegant paw and so on. The second segment, "Nini's Year," evokes much more about months than simply their names, even during March, when the howling winds Nini listens to wouldn't seem to give an ordinary artist much to go on visually. The surprise here is the Nini of December, who "waited for good things," and proudly accepts her holiday gifts—three graystriped kittens. The titular third story may seem a bookbulking appendage or a pretext for including number concepts, but it is also the necessary expansion of Nini's world, for she is a cat of the outdoors. Here her presence is diminished so that sometimes only a head peeps from the edges of whiteframed illustrations depicting life around her home near a lighthouse. The book's culminating spread shows one moon smiling at a 100starred cat constellation above a very tiny cat. There's neither a missing elementary concept nor a jarring fly in the ointment of this bewitching cat's charmed life. (Picture book. 46)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060005375
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/28/2002
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 783,384
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 11.00 (h) x 0.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Anita Lobel's name is synonymous with the best in children's literature. She is the creator of such classics as Alison's Zinnia and Away from Home, and she received a Caldecott Honor for her illustrations in On Market Street. She is the creator of two books about her cat, Nini, One Lighthouse, One Moon (a New York Times Best Illustrated Book), and Nini Here and There. Her childhood memoir, No Pretty Pictures: A Child of War, was a finalist for the National Book Award. Anita Lobel lives in New York City.

Anita Lobel's name is synonymous with the best in children's literature. She is the creator of such classics as Alison's Zinnia and Away from Home, and she received a Caldecott Honor for her illustrations in On Market Street. She is the creator of two books about her cat, Nini, One Lighthouse, One Moon (a New York Times Best Illustrated Book), and Nini Here and There. Her childhood memoir, No Pretty Pictures: A Child of War, was a finalist for the National Book Award. Anita Lobel lives in New York City.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2001

    Wonderful children's book!

    Here's how adorable this book is: my 20-month-old daughter brings it to me about 45 times a day for me to read to her, and I'm not sick of it yet. The pictures are wonderful, and while there's not much of a plot, the cat's adventures are very believably catlike. It's a great book to share with your favorite little kids.

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