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One Lucky Girl
     

One Lucky Girl

by George Ella Lyon, Irene Trivas (Illustrator), Dorling Kindersley Publishing Staff
 
No matter how bright the sun, how high the ball, Nick is there to catch it. Hawkeye, his dad calls him. Then one summer Sunday in the year 1961, the sky at the racetrack trailer park where the family lives isn't so bright—"looks funny," Nick says to his parents, and the air grows very quiet until... "Tornado!" somebody yells. The roaring air sounds like "a

Overview

No matter how bright the sun, how high the ball, Nick is there to catch it. Hawkeye, his dad calls him. Then one summer Sunday in the year 1961, the sky at the racetrack trailer park where the family lives isn't so bright—"looks funny," Nick says to his parents, and the air grows very quiet until... "Tornado!" somebody yells. The roaring air sounds like "a stampede of horses," and the trailer where Nick's baby sister, Becky, has been napping, is suddenly no longer there. it takes a "hawkeye" to see beyond the ruins left behind, to find "one lucky girl" whom the swirling wind has picked up in her crib and sent flying—to blissful safety. The vigorous pastel and watercolor paintings catch every change of family mood and weather—and the tornado sky is unforgettable, as anyone who's seen such a storm coming will attest.

Editorial Reviews

Sesame Street Parents
This tender picture book tells a true tornado story through the eyes of one small boy. Pastel illustrations bring to life the tornado's power, the baby's gentleness, and the boy's determination to find his sister.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
When a tornado hits the trailer park and Nick's mother realizes his baby sister is missing, Nick says, "All the screams nobody had screamed tore out of my mother's mouth." As his parents search through the ruins, it is Nick who finally finds his sister in her crib, miraculously carried by the wind to a field. (The story recalls Gloria Rand and Ted Rand's Baby in a Basket.) Lyon's (Come a Tide) deft storytelling weaves together images with economy and grace. Nick's homely metaphors and his carefully established powers of observation--"Hawkeye," his father calls him--make his story believable and allow the reader to feel his emotions. Searching, he sees "a skillet and a doorknob," and then "a dream, the best you could ever have,/ the one where you find your treasure./ Right there in the green grass,/ plain as cake on a plate." Trivas's (The Pain and the Great One) exquisite pastels grow more textured and menacing during the tornado and its aftermath. The ending is especially satisfying. As the reunited family stands together, bathed in sunlight and surrounded by wildflowers, Nick asks where they are going to live. "Together," says his father, emphasizing the real value of Nick's "treasure." Ages 5-8. (Mar.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Children's Literature
According to the jacket flap, this is a true story; and certainly an exciting one. Our young narrator is called Hawkeye, for his skill in catching the baseball in the field near the racetrack where his parents work. He describes the terrifying afternoon when a tornado suddenly hits their trailer park. As they survey the wreckage, the family realizes with horror that his baby sister is missing. Hawkeye saves the day, and the baby, spotting Becky incredibly asleep in her crib in the middle of the track, truly the lucky girl of the title. The jacket/cover painting hints at the drama inside. There's a baby in a crib in a field full of flowers in the foreground, with a menacing black funnel cloud in the distance. Trivas fills the double pages with paintings that depict the sudden changes from a pleasant sunny day to a devastated war zone, with pieces of debris and Hawkeye's trailer in gray entanglement. Colors are used for their emotional impact, applied with impressionistic force to enhance the emotion, such as the hopeful scene of multicultural neighbors grouped around the happily reunited family. 2000, DK Ink/Dorling Kindersley Publishing Inc., Ages 5 to 8, $15.95. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-This exciting picture book skillfully balances a variety of emotions as a baby is swept away, crib and all, by a tornado, only to be discovered, after a few frantic moments, in a nearby field-safe and sound and still asleep. The story is told by the infant's older brother, Nick, in language that is both straightforward and poetic. He describes the storm as a "-black finger of wind twisting toward us" and his first sighting of his sister as "-a dream, the best you could ever have, the one where you find your treasure." Trivas's pastel illustrations effectively follow the nuances of the text; darker shades are used to depict the storm and its aftermath, and the backgrounds grow gradually warmer as Nick and his parents search breathlessly through the scattered remains of their trailer home. Careful details-a touch of blood on the mother's pale cheek, a black frying pan lying right side up in the yellow dirt, and a colorful mobile still attached to Becky's crib-draw the eye and help to bring the story home. Although children may experience a few moments of anxiety as the dramatic events unfold, they will be reassured by the wholeheartedly happy and triumphant ending.-Joy Fleishhacker, formerly at School Library Journal Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780789426130
Publisher:
DK Publishing, Inc.
Publication date:
02/15/2000
Series:
Richard Jackson Bks.
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.18(w) x 10.54(h) x 0.38(d)
Lexile:
AD260L (what's this?)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

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