One Minute Science

One Minute Science

by Sunna
     
 
Although One Minute Science arrives by way of two stellar dance labels -- Astralwerks, home to Fatboy Slim and Chemical Brothers, and Melankolic, run by Bristol kingpins Massive Attack -- Sunna's debut is an artful take on the industrial modern rock of

Overview

Although One Minute Science arrives by way of two stellar dance labels -- Astralwerks, home to Fatboy Slim and Chemical Brothers, and Melankolic, run by Bristol kingpins Massive Attack -- Sunna's debut is an artful take on the industrial modern rock of Trent Reznor and Tool. Although they're a U.K. quintet, Sunna is primarily the work of one man, programmer, guitarist, and songwriter Jon Harris, who by the dint of his ambition assimilates not only the above, but also Kurt Cobain, Days of the New, and even Peter Gabriel-era Genesis. This personality crisis fills One Minute Science with menacing songs that often rely on the kind of angst-fueled lyrics that appeal to a youthful audience: "I don't like you" goes the repeated chorus to "I'm Not Trading," and the dramatic ballad "I Miss," which is laced with acoustic guitars and strings, laments "I miss hate, I miss war/I miss killing people, and I miss the point." Surprisingly, Sunna's best songs aren't the hard ones but the acoustic guitar-based songs in the vein of "I Miss" -- tracks that are somewhat derivative but show the seeds of an original sound. The oozing, spectral "Too Much" betrays a confessional John Lennon influence, even as it recalls the industrial pop of Garbage. If multiple personalities make for interesting music, keep Sunna away from their medication.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Mario Mesquita Borges
Coming from the U.K., Sunna's One Minute Silence disclosed a striking sound journey undulating amid unruffled rhythms and relentless blasts of guitar power. Dueling within these creation fields, Sunna are introduced as an able unit, reassuring spaces both for the mixing table, dominated by DJ Flatline, and for the rhythm domains, commanded by bassist Shane Goodwin and by drummer Richie Mills. The incisive force of the band's songs came from the heavy guitar riffs conferred by vocals main man Jon Harris and from Ian McLaren. "Power Struggle," the album's most noted track, reassured the team's demand to pursuit contentious sounds, fixing on a prevalent keyboards section and on caustic guitar strains. On the other hand, the following "I Miss" disclosed the band's lyrical intentions, focusing on dark and merciless atmospheres, materialized on demolishing sense scenarios vocalized by Harris. The whole album unveils a distorting journey dictated by the British squad, both on sensitive compositions and on frenzied efforts, like on "I'm Not Trading," the disc's opening track, and "Preoccupation." A vigorous and muscular rendezvous of melodies with abundant aggressive sets, Sunna's debut scoped profuse liaisons with industrial style and alternative metal, revealing a superlative entree for the British squad mongrel and puissant alternative creations.

Product Details

Release Date:
08/15/2000
Label:
Astralwerks
UPC:
0724384970826
catalogNumber:
49708

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Sunna   Primary Artist
Dinah Beamish   Cello
Sally Herbert   Violin
Mary Scully   Double Bass
Neil Davidge   Guitar,Keyboards,Background Vocals
Dave Jenkins   Keyboards
Ian Dark   Turntables
Alex Swift   Guitar,Bass Guitar,Keyboards
Claire Orsler   Viola
Sophie Harris   Cello
Jon Harris   Guitar,Drums,Bass Guitar,Vocals

Technical Credits

Neil Davidge   Arranger,Producer
Dave Jenkins   Programming
Alex Swift   Programming,Producer
Sunna   Arranger,Producer
Lee Shephard   Engineer

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