One More Car, One More Rider

One More Car, One More Rider

3.7 8
by Eric Clapton
     
 
Culled from the tour that's strongly been touted as Slowhand's last stand, this two-disc effort -- which takes its name from the original working title for 1986's August -- is a measured retrospective that seems designed to give a little taste of each one of the flavors in Clapton's musical kitchen. As he's done often at recent shows, he

Overview

Culled from the tour that's strongly been touted as Slowhand's last stand, this two-disc effort -- which takes its name from the original working title for 1986's August -- is a measured retrospective that seems designed to give a little taste of each one of the flavors in Clapton's musical kitchen. As he's done often at recent shows, he spends plenty of time revisiting his blues roots, peppering songs like "Hoochie Koochie Man" and "Cocaine" with his trademark blend of slurry indulgence and crisp riffing. Those won over by that aspect of Clapton's personality -- as well as the no-nonsense rock element that surges forth during renditions of Cream classics such as "Sunshine of Your Love" and "Badge" -- might be a bit taken aback by the degree to which he concentrates on his latter-day adult pop. Both "My Father's Eyes" and "River of Tears" push the nine-minute mark (an expansion that suits, say, the rendition of "Layla" presented here but not these comparatively trifling tunes), while songs from Reptile take up a bit too much space. There are enough solo excursions to satisfy the "Clapton is God" brigade, and the backing band, rounded out by keyboardists Billy Preston and David Sancious, does a fine job fleshing out the quavering "Bell Bottom Blues" and a nice-and-nasty "Going Down Slow." As the final notes of "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" (yes, that one) fade into the ether, an odd sense of wistfulness emerges -- but there's always that replay button.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Eric Clapton had a fierce testimonial to the blues with From the Cradle, but One More Car, One More Rider arrives nearly a decade later, and the difference is stunning. Though he goes through the motions of playing the blues -- a cutting version of the perennial "Key to the Highway," "Hoochie Coochie Man," "Goin' Down Slow," among others here -- the heart of this album is closer to the NPR instrumental jam of "Reptile" than blues. This is mannered, "classy" playing, and the song selection favors either warhorses or recent hits.

Product Details

Release Date:
11/05/2002
Label:
Reprise / Wea
UPC:
0093624837428
catalogNumber:
48374
Rank:
81097

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Eric Clapton   Primary Artist,Guitar,Vocals
Billy Preston   Keyboards,Hammond Organ
David Sancious   Guitar,Keyboards
Andy Fairweather Low   Guitar,Vocals
Nathan East   Bass,Background Vocals
Steve Gadd   Drums
Greg Phillinganes   Keyboards,Hammond Organ

Technical Credits

Big Bill Broonzy   Composer
Willie Dixon   Composer
Champion Jack Dupree   Composer
Jack Bruce   Composer
J.J. Cale   Composer
George Harrison   Composer
Michael Kamen   Composer
Harold Arlen   Composer
Jim Gordon   Composer
Howard Biggs   Composer
Pete Brown   Composer
Guy Charbonneau   Engineer
Eric Clapton   Composer,Producer
Simon Climie   Composer,Producer
John Collins   Tour Manager
Alan Douglas   Engineer
E.Y. "Yip" Harburg   Composer
Pete Jackson   Tour Manager
Will Jennings   Composer
Gordon Kennedy   Composer
Wayne Kirkpatrick   Composer
Billy Moll   Composer
Tommy Sims   Composer
Billy Myles   Composer
Paul Walton   Engineer
Murray Mencher   Composer
Charles Segar   Composer
Lee Dickson   Guitar Techician
Kerry Lewis   Monitor Engineer
St. Louis Jimmy   Composer
Ian Charbonneau   Stage Crew
Joe "Cornbread" Thomas   Composer
Yoshiyasu Kumada   Engineer
Robert Collins   Engineer

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One More Car, One More Rider 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
He has written legendary classic songs that will be around until the end of time yet he has such horrible taste in his own music. Retire already will you! The top 40 hits on this cd like "Tears in Heaven" and "Change the World" were never his best efforts so why ruin a perfectly good cd. Thanks for "Badge" anyway. And as for "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" ,what did I do to deserve that?
Guest More than 1 year ago
Don't buy the "tired" or "going thru the motions" rubbish that has been written about this album. This Live 2001 tour shows a guitar master, firmly comfortable with his songs, and enjoying the celebration of performing them with the best touring band available. He opens solo acoustic; a gutsy move in front of 10s of thousands, and keeps on acoustic for the first few numbers with the band. And it is SOOOOO nice to hear new live versions of recent hits. "Tears in Heaven" is still a tear-jerker, but remarkably joyous in this venue, as a real masterpiece of sound. And EC can still play the blues riffs and rock out on Badge, Layla and Sunshine as well as ever. You never get tired of his lead work, and the production of this recording is flawless. Listen on headphones and my only gripe appears...there is way too much echo and reverb on ECs voice, perhaps to make it sound a little less fragile. But that's all folks. If you were not there, you will be with this 2 hrs+ of classy journeyman's tales.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm a Clapton fan, but this is getting repetitious. Most of us already have what's on here, how many times and on how many more cd's are we going to hear the same songs over and over. This would be good for someone who has never followed Clapton's career and would like a more current greatest hits cd.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a great cd, especially if you saw him on the 2001 tour. Eric plays a variety of different songs with a variety of styles. This album shows how he constantly tries to expand his musical boundries.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Eric Clapton has made some great live albums, particularly the superb "Eric Clapton's Rainbow Concert". This is not one of them. Clapton and his band play supremely well, sure, but they're certainly not playing the blues. Instead they manage to turn everything they touch into slick, lounge-like pop songs with not an ounce of grit. If you prefer Eric Clapton in his 90s balladeer's guise, you'll probably like this album just fine. Nothing wrong with that. But if you like Eric Clapton the bluesman, and have gotten your hopes up by the inclusion of songs like "Hoochie Coochie Man" and "Goin' Down Slow" (in an unrecognizable pop rendition), you'll be sorely disappointed. Everything is done in a bland, unbearably mannered fashion, with not so much as a spark to ignite a little bit of passion in the listener, let alone the smouldering fire of Clapton's sixties and early seventies recordings. And for a closing number, he does "Over The Rainbow". 'Nuff said.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you're dumb enough to think this album was poorly selected and repetitious, don't call yourself a Clapton fan (in reference to some reviews below). Clapton was superb, his magic fingers doing their work, and a supremely perfect perfomance by the back up band. Any REAL Clapton fan should purchase and enjoy this album.
gutiermr More than 1 year ago
Not only was this one of the best concerts that I have attended, but Clapton's originals were performed excellently and this is the best version of Somewhere Over the Rainbow that I have ever heard.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago