One More River to Cross

One More River to Cross

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by Will Henry
     
 

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Ned Huddleston was a Confederate Army slave, poor, hungry, but burning with a rage to be free. When the war ended, precious freedom was finally his. But when Ned stands up to a gang of small-town toughs, he trades that freedom for the harsh life of an outlaw. A wanted man, he heads west, where he discovers the song of the six-gun and the ever-present shadow of the

Overview

Ned Huddleston was a Confederate Army slave, poor, hungry, but burning with a rage to be free. When the war ended, precious freedom was finally his. But when Ned stands up to a gang of small-town toughs, he trades that freedom for the harsh life of an outlaw. A wanted man, he heads west, where he discovers the song of the six-gun and the ever-present shadow of the noose.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780843944501
Publisher:
Dorchester Publishing Company, Inc.
Publication date:
11/01/1998
Pages:
256
Product dimensions:
4.18(w) x 6.78(h) x 0.71(d)

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One More River to Cross 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'One More River to Cross' was a thought-provoking read. Sometimes, though, I had trouble keeping interest in the book because of its episodic nature. The individual scenes don't always hang together, and the result is a linear, static plot with little increase in dramatic tension to keep the reader turning pages.

'One More River to Cross' contains a lot of little stories that mostly have a tinge of 'tall tale' thrown in for flavor. They all ring true to the charactor of Ned Huddleston / Isom Dart until the last scene when the author too intrusively explains Isom's final actions.

Still, this book was first published in 1967, and I think Will Henry was ahead of his time in treating racial themes in western novels.